Pressure switch issue

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Vincent McMahon

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Hi folks, came home this evening to water around my water pressure tank. Figured spigot was corroded and leaking. While examining it, I noticed my pressure gauge gone off the scale on the top end and drip drip drip from the pressure release next to it. Watching it, my gauge goes from off the charts in the top end.. Blowing past 100 psi.. To down to 20 on the low end before it kicks off /on. I am sitting here manually shutting off at 80 while kids are showering. What do you think the issue is. I was ready to dismantle the drsin spigot and clean it up but that's not tonight's problem. Any ideas? Thanks
 

RifRaf

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Does your pressure switch set-up look like something similar to the attached image (my home set-up)?
Pressure Switch+Control Valve+Gauge.JPG

If so, The brass tube that feeds your pressure switch... or the pressure switch diaphragm could be clogged with dirt and the clog within the tube (or diaphragm) is keeping the pressure switch from seeing the "true" water pressure (as shown on the gauge). This happened to me many years ago.
Now... I have to clean the dirt out of my brass pressure switch feed tube and diaphragm every few years for my system to operate properly.
When the brass tube gets really bad, I just replace it (I always have a spare tube on hand just in case I need one right away).
Hope this helps.
 

LLigetfa

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and drip drip drip from the pressure release next to it.
Time to replace the pressure relief valve. What is the range set to on the switch? Is it set to turn on at 20? If so, you should not let the pressure rise to 80. Probably it should have done a full release at 75 PSI. Is the discharge directed down a drain to prevent flooding if it does pop off?

You should also check the amps the pump is drawing in case it is causing the switch contacts to fuse.
 

Reach4

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Does your pressure switch set-up look like something similar to the attached image (my home set-up)?
View attachment 82703
Mike: In most setups, it is better to not have an above-ground check valve when using a submersible. Does yours have the poppet removed, and you are just using the housing as a manifold to mount the pressure switch and gauge?
 

RifRaf

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Mike: In most setups, it is better to not have an above-ground check valve when using a submersible. Does yours have the poppet removed, and you are just using the housing as a manifold to mount the pressure switch and gauge?
My pressure switch is attached to a Control Center Check Valve. The pressure switch and gauge a plumbed into the Control Center after the check valve to show the pressure that is in my holding tank. It's been this way since I bought the house over 30 years ago.
I remember when we had our well pump replaced many years ago, the installers also keep the Control Center Check Valve in place... but they did mention that the well pump also had a check valve.

Is this a bad set-up?... and if so, what are the issues it can cause?
 

Valveman

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My pressure switch is attached to a Control Center Check Valve. The pressure switch and gauge a plumbed into the Control Center after the check valve to show the pressure that is in my holding tank. It's been this way since I bought the house over 30 years ago.
I remember when we had our well pump replaced many years ago, the installers also keep the Control Center Check Valve in place... but they did mention that the well pump also had a check valve.

Is this a bad set-up?... and if so, what are the issues it can cause?
That second check valve has been causing water hammer on pump start for years. It is causing damage even if you can't hear it. Control check valves are only needed when used with a Schrader valve and a bladderless tank.
 

LLigetfa

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It's been this way since I bought the house over 30 years ago.
Maybe water hammer destroyed the innards of it 20 years ago so now it is just a place to connect a pressure switch and gauge.

I'm not familiar with code requirements in Maryland, but that check valve is illegal in many states.
 

RifRaf

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I was unaware of this, but will definitely look into it.
The well water here in Maryland is pretty acidic (I recently replaced all of the copper plumbing with CPVC due to leaks)... so there is a good chance that the well water has already eaten up the check valve in the control unit.
 

Valveman

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The guts of a check valve are usually plastic and rubber with a Stainless Steel spring. It is rare for even acidic water to make them fail. However, water hammer from slamming shut and punching open with every single pump cycle causes 99% of check valve failures.
 
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