Practical knowledge regarding braided stainless supply lines.

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Pat N

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So I'm planning on installing a recirc pump on my hot h2o tank. See pix. The current hot line is 3/4 " copper.
I plan on attaching the pump directly to the hot water tank, and was also planning to use a braided supply line to give me some 'wiggle room' for where I attach to the copper on the other end. The last thing I need is to cut my copper too short and I thought the braided line would allow me to curve it somewhat to make up for the shorter distance between pipe and pump.

However, the braided line seems like it might be too stiff to have it hit squarely on the male threading in order to make the second connection, which defeats the purpose of using it in the first place. The pump's female connector slides maybe 1/8" where it would then engage the threading on the heater, but the braided line has no give and I would have to try to 'S' curve it if I cut the copper a hair long to ensure engagement of the threads.

And then in order for it to be water tight, it would shorten the in between even more as I tighten.

Does anyone have any suggestions for the most successful way to splice into a pipe where there's no 'give' to either

end?

IMG_20211008_161453856.jpg
IMG_20211008_161437639.jpg
 

John Gayewski

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Don't hook it up like that or use a hose.

Set the recirculating so that it's pumping into the bottom of your water heater, pumping the cooler water from your fixtures back into the water heater. Using hard pipe supports the pump. You could actually just set it on something near the water heater pipe it pretty easy. Put a check valve the proper direction between your fixtures and the pump. This is the standard way to set up a recirculation line and pump. If you had a large pump meant to provide pressure you'd want some flex connectors, but a recirc pump usually not. Plus it'll look silly.
 

Pat N

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Don't hook it up like that or use a hose.

Set the recirculating so that it's pumping into the bottom of your water heater, pumping the cooler water from your fixtures back into the water heater. Using hard pipe supports the pump. You could actually just set it on something near the water heater pipe it pretty easy. Put a check valve the proper direction between your fixtures and the pump. This is the standard way to set up a recirculation line and pump. If you had a large pump meant to provide pressure you'd want some flex connectors, but a recirc pump usually not. Plus it'll look silly.
This pump will be used with adapters at my most distant usage and will be using the hot water pipes for the recirculating. I do not have an independent recirc system and this is the recommended installation method.

I think I'm good with installing where I have it, but am looking for info about the ease or any problem with installing within the limits of what is available considering the difficulty of installing where there is limited room for mistakes.
 

John Gayewski

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This pump will be used with adapters at my most distant usage and will be using the hot water pipes for the recirculating. I do not have an independent recirc system and this is the recommended installation method.

I think I'm good with installing where I have it, but am looking for info about the ease or any problem with installing within the limits of what is available considering the difficulty of installing where there is limited room for mistakes.
Ok yeah I thought that pump looked familiar. I'm aware of that system. Not something we install.

I think if you just put a union in the piping it'd be pretty hard to mess up.
 

John Gayewski

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Cut about 2 foot above the water heater and put a union half on the piping. Then hook up your pump. You should have a pretty straight forward measurement after that.

That picture shows a long run of straight pipe. I think you're just intimidated. I still wouldn't use flex connectors for that.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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I agree with John. Install it as intended, then install the male adapter into the pump on the top and mark where the pipe needs to be cut.. Note however that you are tite against the joists and will have to bow the pipe to get it in.. But the pump connection to the water heater is your union. Next solder your MIP onto the cut off section hanging down, apply thread sealant/dope and thread the pump onto the MIP.. now slightly bow the pipe and use the pump as your union to connect it up. Even if you made it ever so slightly too short. You probably have enough play at the joists to loosen/lower and shim the bracket up there to lower it.
 
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