Plumbing main drainage and venting questions

Users who are viewing this thread

Brianttttt

New Member
Messages
15
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
New Jersey
20220430_130858.jpg




Hey couple questions on this plumbing


Is the sanitary Tee and Wye being used properly on the combination drain?

Both sinks are on outside walls where I would like to use a an AAV, this is on a septic system by the way ( do not know if that matters )

There is a 4" "Cleanout" outside with a cap on it on the ground should that be used as a vent? Figured not since it was on the ground.

What packing should I be using for where those rags are on the cast iron?


Notes:
That cast iron main appears to be 4 1/2"
I began installing a vent as per code for my laundry piping so it has began but I do not have these other sinks or shower added to this vent.
Everything is draining at this time. Just wondering about all of this because trying to not siphon these traps; and allow for good drainage for the future.


If there is a better way to do this please let me know as I am obviously not a plumber. Thank you.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,278
Reaction score
1,338
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
So, there's a lot of things wrong in that picture. It should look more like the drawing below. Several points:

- Traps need a vent connection within one pipe diameter of fall from the trap outlet. That would be the shower, lavatory, the laundry and the kitchen sink. The WC is an exception, it can be vented lower down. The WC and shower vents can be wet (drains that are dry vented), but the others need to be dry vented. At least one dry vent has to go through the roof; the rest can be AAVs if your code (NSPC in NJ) allows them.

- My diagram doesn't address the vent through the roof. If the only available vent is that one labeled WC vent, and you want to use AAVs for the rest, the diagram would need some reworking. But if you can get the lav, laundry, or kitchen sink through the roof, it would work.

- The lav / shower/ WC isn't so clear in my drawing, what it means to show is this: the dry vented lav drain turns horizontal and connects to the shower drain with a wye fitting, again with less than 2" of fall (one pipe diameter) between the shower trap and that wye. Then the combined drain hits an upright wye on the WC drain.

- Red is 3" (or bigger), Blue is 1-1/2" or 2". 2" for everything is fine, and required for the laundry standpipe and probably shower. Your code might allow 1-1/2" for the lav drain and/or the kitchen sink drain, not sure.

- To connect new PVC to an intact cast iron hub, there are rubber donuts available that fill the space between the hub and the PVC. You need to know the exact inside diameter of the cast iron hub; the PVC pipe has a standard outside diameter, you just need to know the size.

- That little red extension at the end is a cleanout; I drew it facing up at a 45 degree angle, but it could be horizontal (maybe more common).

Cheers, Wayne

20220430_130858.jpg
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
5,109
Reaction score
1,118
Points
113
Location
92346
If NJ code allows 2 inch for kitchen and laundry then I see no reason for 2 pipes running side by side. The shower trap arm appears under 5 foot . Wayne has a reasonable plan. I'd probably wack the 4 inch at the hub and run all new pipe and if not wanting to disturb the toilet just put a band up high and leave the last foot or so of cast iron for later time
 

Brianttttt

New Member
Messages
15
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
New Jersey
So I do have a vent going through the roof for my laundry. But I see how it is hard to incorporate with my others since I need to do it directly at the trap. I did that one per code. The reason for these all being like this is the order I installed my appliances, later learning to vent. So in some areas making it tough which is why I was trying to utilize the AAV's if possible. AAVs are legal in NJ. I sort of understand what you sent. I get the draining part but would you be able to tell me based on this drawing how many are actually being vented.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,278
Reaction score
1,338
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I get the draining part but would you be able to tell me based on this drawing how many are actually being vented.
What drawing? If you mean my drawing, it requires a dry vent above the floor at the lav, kitchen sink, and laundry. Only one of those needs to go through the roof and the other two could be AAVs. Then the lav wet vents the shower and WC.

If you mean your original photo, the shower is not vented. The WC is vented improperly, as a dry vent should not be horizontal unless at least 6" above the fixture flood rim. And we can't tell what is happening at the kitchen sink, laundry, and lav, as those vent connections would need to be above the floor.

Just to reiterate--the vent connection is for protecting the trap against siphoning, and it needs to occur on the trap arm before it has fallen one pipe diameter. That what prevents siphoning, the air provided by the vent will be at an elevation higher than the place where water first spills out of the trap (the trap weir).

Cheers, Wayne
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
5,109
Reaction score
1,118
Points
113
Location
92346
from what I see Brian the Laundry , the kitchen and bathroom sink arent a problem. The shower looks like its not vented but I cant see that clearly you should be able to tell if there is a vent where the trap arm takes off . The Toilet might function fine but is not legal plumbing.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks