Plumbing for new coffee/wine bar sink and espresso machine.

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Midway

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We are adding a coffee/wine bar and I need to at least rough-in the plumbing for the sink. I also want to connect a cold-water line and drain for an espresso machine. I’ve attached pictures of where the coffee bar will be installed and the crawl space area below. There is a small bathroom behind the same wall but the plumbing is on a different wall. The hot water heater and main water line is very close.

I haven’t decided if I want to complete the installation or hire a plumber but since the coffee bar is being installed December 7th I want to get the hot and cold water lines put in which will require cutting out some wallboard and drilling the required holes to feed the drain and supply lines down into the crawl space. I’d leave as much extra as necessary and cut and add fittings later. Assuming I hire a plumber, what and how should I proceed to allow bar installation and to make the final connections for a plumber strait forward?
Drain_Pipes_1000p.jpg
Wall for coffee bar install 1000p.jpg
Coffee_Bar_Plan_1000p.jpg


Thank you.
 
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Breplum

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Do not install the bar until the rough-in work from electrical and plumbing is completely done. Period.
Most UPC jurisdictions do not allow AAVs. You may need a plumbing vent to the roof if not in the wall.
 

Midway

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Do not install the bar until the rough-in work from electrical and plumbing is completely done. Period.
Most UPC jurisdictions do not allow AAVs. You may need a plumbing vent to the roof if not in the wall.

That is the plan. I am trying to get a plumber, I could do it but my DIY projects tend to take forever. I put myself through college doing journeyman pipefitter work at Todd Shipyards so copper work is a breeze but I don't know much about required venting. I'll remove the phone lines and jack and reuse the hole for one water supply line. I will rough in the electrical and move the vac over myself. Not convenient but at least I can still access the vac outlet from under the sink.

Thanks.

Drain_Pipes_1000p.jpg
Wall for coffee bar 1000p.jpg
 

Jeff H Young

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pretty straight foward run 2 inch through floor in wall or not your choice but get pipe in the wall then 2 x1 1/ 2 x 1 1/2 santee to proper height 1 1/2 vent out roof or probebly tie it to another in the attic. Im not clear if AAVs ever meet code but know that some inspectors let them be installed, Technicaly I dont know that means it meets code or just that an inspector didnt catch it. there might be a clause in code , Ive never been granted one . on certain things like an island bbq sink and other hardships I think a variance should be allowed
 

Tuttles Revenge

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The OP is in KingCo.. not sure if unincorporated or some other local jurisdiction. But Sea/KingCo allows for AAV's to be installed.

I did a LOT of plumbing work at Todd Shipyard and all over Harbor Island for the Port of Seattle. One of the earliest Wirsbo projects we did was installing showers in the shipyard for the Navy when they were having ships worked on. Right below where we were working, Todd was milling a propeller shaft for an icebreaker they said could handle a million pounds of torque.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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And if you're planning on moving the in wall vac.. those aren't normal sized pipe or fittings. I learned that the hard way.

My parents installed a vac outlet in the toe kick of their kitchen island. I believe it has a hose port and also a door so you can just sweep the floor over to the door, open the door and all the dust gets sucked in.
 

Midway

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The OP is in KingCo.. not sure if unincorporated or some other local jurisdiction. But Sea/KingCo allows for AAV's to be installed.

I did a LOT of plumbing work at Todd Shipyard and all over Harbor Island for the Port of Seattle. One of the earliest Wirsbo projects we did was installing showers in the shipyard for the Navy when they were having ships worked on. Right below where we were working, Todd was milling a propeller shaft for an icebreaker they said could handle a million pounds of torque.

Unincorporated King County. My Todd Shipyards history goes back 40 years during the FFG projects. I put in the JP5 fuel lines using Copper Nickle and sil-brazing to the heavy duty couplings that had internal grooves to place the silver alloy rings if I remember correctly. Every braze needed to be x-rayed and I got pretty good at reading blueprints and bending pipe in addition to brazing..
 

Midway

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And if you're planning on moving the in wall vac.. those aren't normal sized pipe or fittings. I learned that the hard way.

My parents installed a vac outlet in the toe kick of their kitchen island. I believe it has a hose port and also a door so you can just sweep the floor over to the door, open the door and all the dust gets sucked in.
I installed the central vacuum system myself when I built the house and still have a box with enough pipe and some couplings but I may need another short 90 and a new stud mount inlet and bracket. Thanks.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Looks good. I would install a cleanout between the tee and the upper elbow.. having it guarantees never needing to use it.

We worked with a contractor that had a contract with the Port of Seattle to spend 1million dollars on projects that didn't need to go out to competitive bid. Lots of weird or odd jobs. Removing and replacing 24" gate valves that belonged to Shell Oil was one of my most memorable there. The valves were inside of underground and therefore under water concrete vaults. The vaults would flood with water as the tide rose, but at different times as the water seeped in. So our work had to be timed with the tides based on the rate of infill and of course we couldn't spill any oil into the water and couldn't get any sea water into the oil pipelines. After the work was done, the port asked us to pressure test the lines. But that wasn't in our contract we told them it would be $500 to run a test. They said that was too much money. So we packed up and left the site. They called up the next day or so and wanted us to run the test.. But now that we were offsite and would have to set up again, the price was double, 1k.. Again, too much money. There was a bunch of arguing in their office and one guy in the background said if they didn't take the 1k offer he would have to put it out to bid... We won the bid for $24k. There were no other bidders.

I've since kayaked next to the shipping side of the island where the oil pipeline was under the deck... some of it has rotted away and the pipe was dangling into the water!
 
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