Nine Year Old Envirotemp 50 Gallon Water Heater

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Hudson

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I wonder if that pressure tank should have something more to carry the weight. Maybe the PEX is strong enough./

Reach4: I shook the expansion pressure tank and it felt mostly empty if not all empty. The short run of PEX seems to be pretty strong.

I'm still debating whether to precharge to 60 since my gauge shows highs of 60 overnight. I've read the expansion tank manual...several times...I don't understand. I had this conversation with my plumber. He said, "I get 45...set it for 45"; he didn't seem to be concerned about the overnight high.
 

Master Plumber Mark

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Where does the drain pan go??? You need to raise the pressure on the exp tank to 55 0r 65... and you need to support the
expansion tank with some bailing wire or something nailed to the rafters above...
... It should not be just standing on the pex without something to hold the
weight....it will wobble and list from the weight eventually.....


Please inform me .....I want to know what kind of automatic shut off device you installed on this thing...
never heard of a good one that uses batteries....
 

Hudson

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Mark, Thanks for the coaching!

Drain Pan: The installer ran a pipe from the drain pan through the wall to the outdoors.

Pressure: I plan to raise it...thanks

Expansion Tank Support: That makes sense...I'll come up with a plan.

Shut off: It's a Floodstop FS3/4NPT ...the batteries are backup...the device is plugged into a nearby receptacle. Here's about the same model...don't think mine is a "V4" whatever that means....

Your comments are appreciated!
 

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Hudson

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Hey, it's a good experiment.
Just make sure it's not in an area where leaking can damage the home. With something that old, a leak can happen anytime.

I kept thinking about your comment..."make sure it's not in an area where leaking...." I called a plumber to get a quote... he looked at my now previous tank, he pointed out evidence of old seeps...I remembered a couple of quarts of water on the floor a few months back. I decided to replace the unit and add the drain pan, auto cut off, and expansion tank. Thanks!

also Gary Swart's comment was influential: "A 15 year old water heater could fail at anytime. I doubt that you would get much satisfaction with that "lifetime warranty" but I don't know for sure."
 
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Hudson

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you need to support the
expansion tank with some bailing wire or something nailed to the rafters above...
... It should not be just standing on the pex without something to hold the
weight....it will wobble and list from the weight eventually.....
.

I made a wooden support out of scrap lumber and attached it to a shelf. Nothing wobbles...it's solid. Thanks again for the help...now I've got to get the pressure up to 55. EDIT...done...pressure is 55. I first turned off the cold water valve going into the tank...turned on the hot water at the sink...then measured.

expansion tank support.jpg
 
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Hudson

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the wood support looks fine... and will do the well ///
you should never have to remove it anytime soon



how much did that electric shut off valve cost you????

$240 installed.
$423.50 IF I decide to install a pressure reducing valve...that's the next question...I'm trying to see what the water system people say about the pressure.
pic of pressure gauge

water heater quote pressure reducing valve.JPG
water heater quote.JPG
IMG_1315.JPG
 
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JerryR

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With a normal pressure of 35 PSI AND peak water pressure of 65 PSI I don't think anyone here would recommend that you install a PRV. If you get over 80-85 then a PRV setting pressure at 60 PSI makes sense.
 

Hudson

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With a normal pressure of 35 PSI AND peak water pressure of 65 PSI I don't think anyone here would recommend that you install a PRV. If you get over 80-85 then a PRV setting pressure at 60 PSI makes sense.

JerryR: Thanks...that is useful info! I asked the water utility people about pressure in my neighborhood; instead of giving me a general answer they came out and checked the pressure and responded as follows:

"Water Pressure Test taken today 4/28/15 @ 11:25am. Water Pressure at meter was 52 PSI and Pressure at your house was 40 PSI. Per Our Water Tech you have sufficient pressure. Please let us know if you have any questions and Thank you again for using EGov."

I responded to their email asking if the water pressure ever goes up to 80-85.
 

Hudson

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Jerry R: I asked the following questions to the person in charge of my municipal water system....

"I'm trying to find out if I should install a pressure reducing valve.

How many people in the my section of the water system have pressure reducing valves?

It looks like there would be no value in having such a device?

Would the pressure ever get up to 80 or 85?"

I received this answer:

"The supervisor over the water dept said that you currently have the most pressure. He agrees with your statement below the device (a pressure reducing valve) would not be of value for you and he also stated he does not know anyone in that area that has a pressure reducing value. The end that you are on , you probably have better pressure than others in your neighborhood's section. "

Therefore, it looks like my project is complete...thanks to all!
 

Kayleigh Bohannan

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As of, I think, April 1, the codes require additional insulation and efficiency on larger WH.

Most of the companies that do offer a longer warranty, it is the same tank. On some of them, they do install a second anode rod and may use a better quality drain valve. Some replace the valve that comes on the WH with a full port ball valve - this way, there's less restriction on the outlet and if you want, you have a straight shot into the tank to maybe dislodge some crud.

If you gravity drain the tank, yes, the outlet needs to be lower. But, just like the water goes everywhere in your home, if you attach a hose to the drain valve and open it...you have the same water pressure as on the normal outlet, and you can run it anywhere. Now, trying to also move any crud, I'd not want to run it too high, but with decent volume, you should be able to drain it. Note, not all hoses are created equal...you'd want one that won't be damaged by the hot water and fairly large diameter. IT can take a lot of hours for the water to cool off if you shut it down. But, maybe the best way is to shut it off before your morning showers. It would be cooling off as new water comes in without the burner enabled but you should be able to get at least a few reasonable showers before it got too cool to be comfortable.

There are some WH dams that can be installed on a solid floor like a slab that don't fit underneath...they essentially get glued to the floor. Easier to use a pan if you're replacing.

If you are not ready to replace, but you know your tank water heater is on its last leg, you can install the Heatworks MODEL 1, this new tankless water heater that accepts pre heated water. This way you can use it in conjunction with your unit either as a "booster" to your tank (meaning as you shower, if your tank starts to run out of hot water the MODEL 1 kicks on to maintain the temperature till you are done) or you can use it as a backup for your tank, so WHEN it goes, you aren't out of luck. Full disclosure, I work for Heatworks, but I am posting here to help with any issues anyone on the forum might be having with their current system or give advice. Here to help! The MODEL 1 digital tankless water heater doesn't use a heating element. Instead we use graphite electrodes. Short story, that means that there is no scaling, no super heated part that will fail or cost you $ in maintenance, and you get truly instant, safe and infinite hot water. Feel free to ask me any questions. I hope this helps!
 
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