Lots of Sediment After Pump Short Cycling Fixed

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Chrisdeli

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Hi Everyone,

Any advice you may be able to give me would be greatly appreciated! I just had the water tank and check valve replaced on my 400 foot well. The water pressure gauge had been short cycling very rapidly between 40 and 60 psi meaning the pump was cutting off and on very quickly which is why I had the check valve and water tank replaced. I am sure it was short cycling for at least a few hours until I noticed it because there was no hot water due to the sediment filter in my tankless water heater being full not allowing water to flow to it. Anyway the service people came out and replaced the 20 gallon water tank and also put a new above ground check valve to replace the failed foot valve that was not replaced. After this was done I replaced the spin down filter with a new 250 mesh. The problem now is that my spin down filter is quickly becoming clogged with sediment and I have to flush it every few hours. I know the pump short cycling probably stirred up some dirt down the well water. Do you think that once the 400 foot water line from the well to the house is cleared of sediment by me flushing the spin down filter twice a day everything should be OK and if so how long will it take for the water line to flush out--- or is there something worse going on here? I don't know what size mesh the old filter was but maybe now that I replaced with a 250 mesh it is just catching more sediment than before?


Thank you in advance.

Chris
 

Valveman

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A check valve at the tank cannot make up for a failed check valve at the pump. Adding a check valve at the tank can make it worse. The water can still be dropping in the well pipe and stirring up the sediment. However, any well should be pumped out for quite a while after pulling the pump and disturbing the well. Wells should be pumped out at high volume before connecting the filters.
 

Reach4

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Usually there would be a hose spigot before filtering. That would be a good place to draw water for getting the stirred-up sediment to get washed out. If you have no such outdoor spigot, you could use the drain valve at the pressure tank, and run a hose out of the window.
 

Chrisdeli

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A check valve at the tank cannot make up for a failed check valve at the pump. Adding a check valve at the tank can make it worse. The water can still be dropping in the well pipe and stirring up the sediment. However, any well should be pumped out for quite a while after pulling the pump and disturbing the well. Wells should be pumped out at high volume before connecting the filters.
Thank you for the quick response. I should have been more clear- they put the check valve in the pipes that are right underneath the well wall cover- when you open the well wall cover the check valve is the first thing you see. It probably doesn't make a difference but thought I would clarify.
 

Chrisdeli

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Usually there would be a hose spigot before filtering. That would be a good place to draw water for getting the stirred-up sediment to get washed out. If you have no such outdoor spigot, you could use the drain valve at the pressure tank, and run a hose out of the window.
Thank you. Would this hose spigot located somewhere along the well wall casing outside from the well to the house or would any outdoor hose bib do? I have some outdoor hose bibs but if it is not these then I will try to find it. Unfortunately a spigot drain valve at the pressure tank was never installed- I bought the house with this configuration already done.
 

Reach4

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How about posting a photo that shows the pipe coming from the well, the input of the pressure tank, the pressure switch, and the pressure gauge. 800pixels and 200KB max if you upload directly.

That yard hydrant near the well is almost certainly before any filter.

Do you have a pitless adapter (water line connects where you cannot see it but casing extends out of the ground) or do you have a well seal? I am wondering how you were able to view into the well.
 

Valveman

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Thank you for the quick response. I should have been more clear- they put the check valve in the pipes that are right underneath the well wall cover- when you open the well wall cover the check valve is the first thing you see. It probably doesn't make a difference but thought I would clarify.
Yeah doesn't make any difference. It shouldn't be there.
 

Chrisdeli

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How about posting a photo that shows the pipe coming from the well, the input of the pressure tank, the pressure switch, and the pressure gauge. 800pixels and 200KB max if you upload directly.

That yard hydrant near the well is almost certainly before any filter.

Do you have a pitless adapter (water line connects where you cannot see it but casing extends out of the ground) or do you have a well seal? I am wondering how you were able to view into the well.
 
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