Laying out Multiple Delta Shower/Tub Valves

Users who are viewing this thread

Nate E

New Member
Messages
14
Reaction score
4
Points
3
Location
Denver, CO
Shower:
Currently roughing-in a shower with two delta Multichoice valves (R10000-UNBX). One for a fixed shower head and one for a hand shower. I’ve read here that ideally each valve should have its own supply from the 3/4” trunk. In my case the 3/4 line is decent distance from the shower. Is the reason to run separate branches to prevent low flow when using both showers? I will be using PEX-A.

There would be quite a bit less tubing overall, and I imagine that the secondary head would get hot water faster if tees are installed near the valves. I’m wondering how experienced folks would do it.

Proposed layout with tees at valves:
IMG_0654.jpeg



Tub:
There will be a separate freestanding tub. I’m trying to decide on hardware to fill it. Due to the crazy cost of name brand dedicated tub fillers and the sketchy reliability of the cheap ones, I am leaning toward another Delta Multichoice valve with only a non-diverter type tub spout hooked up. The shower outlet would get plugged. The standard layout always has both showerhead, valve, and bath spout in line as in the screenshot from Delta. Due to a lack of vertical space on the pony wall I’m considering installing the valve and spout side-by-side. Wondering if any experienced folk see an issue with this setup.

Screenshot of tub/shower valve layout from Delta:
IMG_0653.jpeg


Proposed:
IMG_0655.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Breplum

Licensed plumbing contractor
Messages
1,850
Reaction score
741
Points
113
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Be aware of max flow rate for that tub filler application on the hot side vs the capacity of the tub. We often use 3/4" fast fill valves for big tubs. Don't forget that water heaters do not deliver the total capacity bc cold water mixes as heater empties. You only really get ~65% of listed capacity.

as to the two valve shower, not enough info. distances, pressure all come in to play. Hot water recirc system with 3/4" all the way to the bathroom is always ideal.
 

Nate E

New Member
Messages
14
Reaction score
4
Points
3
Location
Denver, CO
For the tub, I tried to look up 3/4 fast fill valves and came up empty. Any recommendations? Budget is always a factor, and may have to be weighed against tub fill time if that’s the main concern. Honestly, the tub may not get used more than a couple times per year. The R10000 Multichoice valves and trims are quite reasonable, and seem reliable.

Talked to the wife about the shower and confirmed that we’d never plan to run both shower heads at the same time. I don’t know the water pressure, but we had no issues with the old shower. I ran some calcs for “equivalent length” comparing the old copper lines and fittings to the new PEX and (much fewer) fittings. PEX wins on paper. We were happy with the old shower pressure and flow, so I’m hoping it will perform the same. Just want to make sure I don’t make things worse or I will never hear the end of it.
 
Last edited:

WorthFlorida

Clinical Trail on a Cancer Drug Started 1/31/24. ☹
Messages
5,691
Solutions
1
Reaction score
976
Points
113
Location
Orlando, Florida
What size water heater, gas or electric? As Breplum suggest, the water heater my run out of hot water when filling it with a fast flow. If you find your self taking too long to fill at a low flow rate so the water heater can keep up, look up "Tank Booster". You set the water heater at 140º which nearly double the water heater delivery. A fifty gallon tank will be an equivalent to a 90-95 gallon tank. The booster has a tempering valve that mixes cold water down to 120 degrees.
 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
4,085
Reaction score
1,381
Points
113
Why not install a MODEL#: R22000 MultiChoice® Universal Integrated Shower Diverter valve? Distance/time from valve to shower outlet in a standard 60" space is entirely negligable IMO.

Shower flow will be fine for 2 shower outlets since the heads will be limited to 2.5gpm or 1.8gpm in colorado.

Average fill for any of the Delta valves and trim cartridges is about 6gmp at 45psi.. you can get up to 8 or 9gpm if you use their thermostatic cartridges/trimsets.
 

Nate E

New Member
Messages
14
Reaction score
4
Points
3
Location
Denver, CO
We have an 82 gallon gas water heater. Tank booster looks like a nice solution to keep o. The back pocket. Basically a master thermostatic valve if I understand correctly. With that size tank and four people in the house, I’m hoping that will not be a frequent issue.

The R22000 valves are really nice. The original plan was to use one, but got sticker shock with the trims. I saw it recommended somewhere on the internet to just install dual standard valves. We were able to pick up two trims with rough-ins for under $300. It’s a little more annoying laying everything out cleanly though.

Sounds like the R22000 valve and associated trim could easily supply enough flow to both shower heads simultaneously. Based on that having the two separate valves should be more than enough.

Would anyone be able to comment on the sketch for the water supplying the valves. All good?

Also can we confirm that installing the bath valve and spout horizontally, or a few feet away without significantly affecting flow rate? Obviously straight down and a short run would be the best, but I’m aiming for good enough. The shower port will be capped.
 

Breplum

Licensed plumbing contractor
Messages
1,850
Reaction score
741
Points
113
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Your tub layout shouldn't have any problems. The water will stagnate in the low loop, but, just don't drink it on first draw :oops: .
 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
4,085
Reaction score
1,381
Points
113
Certainly! When laying out multiple Delta shower/tub valves, it's essential to ensure proper spacing and alignment for a clean and functional installation. Begin by measuring and marking the locations of each valve, keeping in mind the recommended guidelines provided by Delta. Make sure to account for factors such as accessibility, user convenience, and aesthetic considerations.

Delta 9, a keyword you provided, could refer to a specific Delta product or model. Ensure that each Delta shower/tub valve is positioned correctly, with the required clearances and support. It's crucial to follow Delta's installation instructions for each valve to guarantee proper functioning and to meet warranty requirements.

Consider the overall design and aesthetics of the space to create a cohesive look. Properly align the valves both horizontally and vertically to achieve symmetry and a professional finish. Double-check all measurements before making any cuts or installations to avoid errors.

Additionally, when working with multiple Delta valves, coordinate the installation with other components such as showerheads, spouts, and any additional features. This ensures that the entire system works seamlessly together, providing a reliable and satisfying shower or tub experience.

Remember to follow Delta's guidelines for connecting and securing the valves to the water supply lines. Use the recommended tools and materials to ensure a secure and leak-free installation. Once everything is in place, test the system thoroughly to confirm that each Delta 9 valve functions as intended.

In summary, when laying out multiple Delta shower/tub valves, precision, adherence to guidelines, and attention to detail are crucial for a successful and reliable installation.
Thanks for using AI to generate a generic description on how to do plumbing...golf clap

**Associated post and apparently its "author" appear to have been Deleted..**
 
Last edited:

Stifled_1

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
Texas
I was thinking of the two head configuration, no tub. But, I never thought of using to valves. I was thinking of one valve and separate diverter. Not a big fan of combination units.

What would be the best converter to pair with a highly recommended valve?
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks