How to align PVC pipe in cast hub with donut

Users who are viewing this thread

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,678
Reaction score
3,912
Points
113
Location
IL
Does that conduit connect to the box in your photo? If not, the conduit may carry wires from the breaker panel via the slab. Then the laundry outlet was a later addition, and is powered via the attic.

If it is not easy to trace, you could cause a GFCI fault with an outlet/receptical tester in the bedroom. See if that trips the GFCI outlet in your photo. This is a cheap outlet tester with GFCI test button: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-Tough-GFCI-Receptacle-Tester-TD35091B/468927687
 

TacoFan

New Member
Messages
21
Reaction score
3
Points
3
Location
California
Does that conduit connect to the box in your photo? If not, the conduit may carry wires from the breaker panel via the slab. Then the laundry outlet was a later addition, and is powered via the attic.

If it is not easy to trace, you could cause a GFCI fault with an outlet/receptical tester in the bedroom. See if that trips the GFCI outlet in your photo. This is a cheap outlet tester with GFCI test button: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-Tough-GFCI-Receptacle-Tester-TD35091B/468927687
Yes the conduit connects to the bottom of the box. The conduit runs from the box, under the slab, and into the nearest bedroom.

The washer outlet is 100% definitely powering the bedroom outlet. It was wire nutted so I believe the 2 prong bedroom outlet isn’t actually gfci protected and wouldn’t trip the gfci either. It’s not to current code but must have been when the house was built.

The washer outlet gets its power directly from a sub panel via a wire run over the roof.

I got permission to put a blank plate over the bedroom outlet, remove the emt, and cut the rigid conduit exiting the slab at a lower height.

I’ll keep the disconnected wires full length (but connected to nothing), just in case they’re needed later.

We’re going to rewire the house in the future, so we’ll have to wire the bedroom in a code compliant way soon anyway.

This will give me enough room to run 2” into the donut and I’ll use 22 angled couplings to get the pipes lined up with the vent.

Thanks for the discussion everyone, I think this will be the best/easiest option
 
Last edited:

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,678
Reaction score
3,912
Points
113
Location
IL
I really think that is EMT AKA thinwall conduit -- not rigid. Rigid conduit has a specific meaning.
I was thinking of you mounting a box near the floor, and having the wires that head into the slab in that box. Then run power to the new box either from where it comes now, or via the attic. That lets you power your bedroom outlet, but route the conduit where it does not interfere with the trap.
 

TacoFan

New Member
Messages
21
Reaction score
3
Points
3
Location
California
I really think that is EMT AKA thinwall conduit -- not rigid. Rigid conduit has a specific meaning.
I was thinking of you mounting a box near the floor, and having the wires that head into the slab in that box. Then run power to the new box either from where it comes now, or via the attic. That lets you power your bedroom outlet, but route the conduit where it does not interfere with the trap.

Yeah in the future, I’ll run new wires to the bedroom outlet.

There are two different types of conduit in the pitcture. Below the fitting I believe is rigid conduit, and above the fitting I believe is emt. I’m planning to remove the emt entirely and then chop the lower (rigid conduit, I believe) conduit off closer to the slab to make room.
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
5,838
Reaction score
1,536
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
There are two different types of conduit in the pitcture. Below the fitting I believe is rigid conduit, and above the fitting I believe is emt. I’m planning to remove the emt entirely and then chop the lower (rigid conduit, I believe) conduit off closer to the slab to make room.
If that's correct, and if you are able to cut the rigid conduit without damaging the wires inside, there are compression rigid connectors that would connect the cutoff rigid directly to a new junction box. Then you could resupply that junction box e.g. with NM cable, ideally from a different circuit than the laundry receptacle.

Cheers, Wayne
 

TacoFan

New Member
Messages
21
Reaction score
3
Points
3
Location
California
So I got the 1.5 inch PVC out of the hub, which has an ID of 2.8 9” at the top. measuring the metal pipe exiting the hub into the ground, it’s a hair over 1.75”, maybe 1 7/8 absolute max. I measured by finding a pry bar that just barely fits in the pipe, and it’s a little over 1.75”. The PVC is pretty much a true 2”. Can I connect the larger pvc to the smaller metal drain pipe/hub, or will that cause blockages since I’m reducing the pipe size?

F776CBEB-4D54-42F3-9CC1-7C634FD1BB58.jpeg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TacoFan

New Member
Messages
21
Reaction score
3
Points
3
Location
California
Here’s where we ended up. Got the 2” all plumbed in, tested to confirm it’s all watertight and drains at full flow from a garden hose. Thanks for the help everyone!

C5A76168-EE5F-4617-9847-85605DB5E836.jpeg
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks