Help with installing outdoor outlets on new construction

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ShadowAviator

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What is the best way to install outdoor outlets? I have tried to look some up but haven't really found anything that helps.

The interior walls aren't cover yet. The exterior is corrugated metal (this is a shed home).

Do you just run romex to a normal electrical box that sits flush with the exterior siding, and then install an in use cover and caulk around it?

I wasn't sure if something more was required.
 

Reach4

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Do you just run romex to a normal electrical box that sits flush with the exterior siding, and then install an in use cover and caulk around it?
No. Use a weatherproof box. Run wire through threaded conduit from indoors out to the box. You can have another box inside, where you can splice your NM (such as Romex) to the THHN wires going to the outside box. You need a GFCI, which could be in the inside box.
 

ShadowAviator

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When do the wires go through the wall? Does the conduit go through the wall to the outside, then travel to the exterior outlet? Or does the conduit travel in the wall then goes through the exterior siding and directly into the back of the box?
 

Reach4

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I would prefer the path through the back of the box and through the wall, but whatever works. Plug the holes you don't use.
 

wwhitney

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I like the Arlington INBOX. They have many versions for different exterior buildups outside of the weather resistive barrier (tar paper, tyvek, housewrap, etc). The flat flange should be tied into the weather resistive barrier, and of course the air barrier continuity needs to be maintained. But then once you have done that, the interior portion of the box can be simply be fed with NM cable.

For something like an AC disconnect or other 3R enclosure mounted on top of the siding, I like to use a threaded nipple (with thread sealant) out the back, with the exterior of the nipple sealed to the weather resistive barrier. Then just pass NM cable from the framing cavity through the nipple into the 3R enclosure, and use ductseal inside the nipple to restore the air barrier.

P.S. The problem with the video is that siding is not water tight. So he is using the wrong box there.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Stuff

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It's always up to your local rules. A box mounted flush can be considered a dry location. Then a weatherproof in-use cover, WR receptacle, GFCI protected, NM cable. Think about where the main electrical panel is mounted on the outside. NM cables come in the back no problem.

That said, the Arlington boxes are nice.
 

ShadowAviator

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I guess to follow up on this, I went with the Arlington boxes. Simple, easy, and look nice.

I don't have them installed yet, but I think thats the way to go for anyone wanting to something similar.

There are no local rules here, but things are dangerous enough on the farm. I want to come home to a house that's safe at the end of the day.
 
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