Help identifying toilet hard supply line

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JRusconi12

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First off, this is my first post, I’m In the middle of a bathroom renovation and have found several topics to help me along the way!

Looking for some help identifying and choosing what plumbing I need.

I had to move the toilet 4” to the left to fit a bigger vanity and meet 30” code.

Now my problem is my supply out of the wall is dead center to the back of the toilet. It is definitely threaded pipe, possibly 1/2”?(5/8”OD) It will unthread from fitting behind the wall but I do not want to fully unthread until I have parts in hand and shut off the water.

Attached are a few pics of the pipe. Thinking I could just get a shorter nipple to thread in there?
 

JRusconi12

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Reach4

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3/8 nominal pipe/nipple is 0.675 OD.

Is your plan to put a 90 just outside the wall?
 

jadnashua

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Is that plated brass? If it's galvanized steel, the piping in the wall may be, too, and that may make this a whole lot riskier (check with a magnet). You'll need a similar nipple, some pipe dope or PTFE tape and a new shutoff and escutcheon along with probably a right-angle valve. Depending on the toilet you choose, you may have to break down and relocate the supply line as you do want to be able to reach the handle to shut the water off on occasion.

When you unscrew the nipple, the pipe fitting IN the wall may move, making screwing in a new nipple harder, and you must ensure you get a proper wrap of PTFE tape or pipe dope on it. Right now, it looks like the hole is too small to verify that joint is made well, and could leak if it isn't. IOW, while it may go back together easy, you won't know, and you might just want to open the wall and move the pipe to make the connection neater and ultimately easier. You won't know the length of the new nipple required until you take the old one out since you don't know how much is hidden IN the wall right now. You can probably tell if you shut the water off, remove the valve and probe the hole to see where the fitting is. An inspection camera may be useful, but not necessarily required.
 

JRusconi12

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3/8 nominal pipe/nipple is 0.675 OD.

Is your plan to put a 90 just outside the wall?
I was thinking either a 90 right off the wall, or a 2” close nipple.
Is that plated brass? If it's galvanized steel, the piping in the wall may be, too, and that may make this a whole lot riskier (check with a magnet). You'll need a similar nipple, some pipe dope or PTFE tape and a new shutoff and escutcheon along with probably a right-angle valve. Depending on the toilet you choose, you may have to break down and relocate the supply line as you do want to be able to reach the handle to shut the water off on occasion.

When you unscrew the nipple, the pipe fitting IN the wall may move, making screwing in a new nipple harder, and you must ensure you get a proper wrap of PTFE tape or pipe dope on it. Right now, it looks like the hole is too small to verify that joint is made well, and could leak if it isn't. IOW, while it may go back together easy, you won't know, and you might just want to open the wall and move the pipe to make the connection neater and ultimately easier. You won't know the length of the new nipple required until you take the old one out since you don't know how much is hidden IN the wall right now. You can probably tell if you shut the water off, remove the valve and probe the hole to see where the fitting is. An inspection camera may be useful, but not necessarily required.
I’m not sure of the material. It’s a first floor bath and I can see the pipe going up thru the rafters. It appears to come off the main cold supply with a hand bent piece of copper.

It looks as if the fitting is right behind the Sheetrock. I can see the start of the threads on the opposed end.
 

John Gayewski

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Just get a 3/8" ips chrome nipplex whatever length you need or want, a 3/8" ips (npt)X 3/8" comp. stop, and a 3/8" ips escutcheon. Easy peasy. Then you'll just need the right flex connector length. 3/8" comp. X 7/8"
 

jadnashua

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If you have access from below, I'd consider moving the supply over. Patching the wall is pretty easy, but a right-angle might work to get it over. SOme toilets have a fair amount of room behind, so it may not be that big of a deal where it is if you can turn it to the side. When tightening, or loosening, if things are tight, depending on how the pipe in the wall is anchored, you could kink things, so having someone hold the fitting under there while dealing with it might be useful. Getting the nipple and valve tight enough can put some good torque on the pipe, so a wrench on the fitting can make a difference.
 
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