Frost Proof Hydrant Directly to Well Concerns

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maineoffthegrid

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Hey all!

We have a well in Maine that is 520' static level 15' and a low refill rate of about a 1/4gpm.

We recently installed a a Grundfos 5SQ-320 at 300ft on 200psi PE pipe. We currently don't have a pressure tank or pressure switch. I connected a frost proof hydrant directly from the pitless adapter with 1in PE pipe. The pump is wired to plug in directly to a 240v plug on the generator.

We are only running the pump when the hydrant is open but I have concerns.

If the hydrant or pipe got clogged with some sediment, but still allowed some water to flow, would that burn the pump out?

We ran the pump for around 40mins the other day and the water pressure seemed to start to drop towards the end. Does it have anything to do with the water level/refill rate of the well? Based on my math, the pump is a little over 6gpm, I don't believe running it for 40mins would have run the well out of water. We should have access to around 420 gallons (6in hole).

If I had to do a pressure tank, could I connect it after the hydrant or should it connect directly from the pitless? The only issue is the tank and switch would have to be above ground for now until we could build an insulated well house.

I just don't want to cause any damage to the pump as they are not cheap! Any advice is appreciated!
 

Reach4

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Either way works fine. If you connected the pressure tank and switch after the yard hydrant, the water would be fed to the pressure switch and the yard hydrant via a tee. So at that point, if the yard hydrant were blocked or off, the path is thru the tee.

You have a 5sq07-320.

If the well drops, pressure up top will drop. Flow will drop. Have you looked at the model 5 SQ performance curves?

If you ever pull the pump for some reason, I would add a flow inducer.
 

Fitter30

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Pump has a thermal overload for motor protection. This is on page 5
If there is a risk that the motor will be covered with
sediment, it is recommended the pump be placed in a
flow sleeve. The motor should always be installed
above the well screen
 
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Valveman

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If the pump is running but not moving water for some reason, the pump will not last long. It is good to have a pressure relief valve in the line so if the hydrant got closed the prv would pop off, keeping the pump cool. Like you said, the well should make a 420 gallon cistern, which would let you use water at any rate needed in the house. With a 10 GPM, 1HP you would still have 6-7 GPM at 50 PSI as the water level pulls down to 300'. But with that 5 GPM pump, if the water level pulls down close to 300' the pump can only produce 1-2 GPM at 40 PSI. I don't think you will be happy with that as it is not enough to run a shower. Since you are making an insulated well house you should make it large enough for a cistern and booster pump so you can have all the water and pressure you need in the house.

Well feeding cistern with sub booster.jpg

Well feeding house and cistern with sub booster.jpg


Jet pump from cistern new.jpg
 

Reach4

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" But with that 5 GPM pump, if the water level pulls down close to 300' the pump can only produce 1-2 GPM at 40 PSI. I don't think you will be happy with that as it is not enough to run a shower."

If my well water fell to near the intake, I would like the flow and pressure to drop to a low level. For one thing, that would alert me to stop using water.

Installing the pressure relief sure makes sense. If the pressure relief, is above ground, it could freeze. But I think this pump operation is not done in freezing weather.
 

maineoffthegrid

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Hey all, great thanks for the input. I thought of another question. I am running the pump off of a 5500w champion generator. It's a standard generator, not an inverter generator. Is there a potential that the generator could damage the pump because it makes 'dirty' energy? I was reading that it could potentially damage sensitive electronics. Would the well pump be considered sensitive?
 

Valveman

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There are no sensitive electronics in a standard submersible pump/motor, a pressure switch, or even a Cycle Stop Valve. Switches, mechanical valves, and squirrel cage induction motors are fairly robust. Add some controls with sensitive electronics and that is a different story.
 
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