Dishwasher - Type of Wire to Use

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C317414

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Hello,

Our dishwasher leaked and damaged the floor. The dishwasher was hard-wired to the house using NM cable (Romex type). The guys from the water remediation company cut the cable, instead of disconnecting it. They cut it too short, so it will need to be replaced. I have a few questions:

1- I understand that NM cable is not allowed for this application, because it will have to flex as the dishwasher is pushed in or pulled out. Is this correct? If so, what is the appropriate type of cable to use?

2- Would it be better to install an outlet behind the dishwasher or under the sink and plug-in the dishwasher instead? The drywall had been removed, so I have access to everything.

3- The dishwasher circuit is not on a GFCI. Does the code require one? Can I use a GFCI circuit breaker, so it's easily accessible?

Thanks
 

John Gayewski

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My opinion is yes having an outlet and making a whip to plug the dishwasher into is best.

Yes it should be a gfci protected outlet either at the outlet or in the panel, or doesn't matter which.
 

Tolbertino

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Hello,

Our dishwasher leaked and damaged the floor. The dishwasher was hard-wired to the house using NM cable (Romex type). The guys from the water remediation company cut the cable, instead of disconnecting it. They cut it too short, so it will need to be replaced. I have a few questions:

1- I understand that NM cable is not allowed for this application, because it will have to flex as the dishwasher is pushed in or pulled out. Is this correct? If so, what is the appropriate type of cable to use?

2- Would it be better to install an outlet behind the dishwasher or under the sink and plug-in the dishwasher instead? The drywall had been removed, so I have access to everything.

3- The dishwasher circuit is not on a GFCI. Does the code require one? Can I use a GFCI circuit breaker, so it's easily accessible?

Thanks
I can't understand why Kitchen Aid dishwashers come with a standard 3 prong plug? When you install the plug directly behind the dishwasher the plug is straight and sticks out close to three inches. I purchased a low profile flat plug cord and a recessed outlet box to replace what came with it. Now I can get the dishwasher far enough back to seal properly. The 12/2 W/G low profile cord was a whopping $30.00 on Amazon but it worked.
 

Jeff H Young

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New homes here have always had the outlet under sink for D/W and 99 percent or more use a plug not hardwired. it does add to the mess under a k/s though and the straight plugs even under a sink arent that Tidy but thats what I see in my world in 99 out of a 100 houses at least
 

wwhitney

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I can't understand why Kitchen Aid dishwashers come with a standard 3 prong plug? When you install the plug directly behind the dishwasher the plug is straight and sticks out close to three inches.
Because installing the receptacle directly behind the dishwasher is prohibited by NEC 422.16(B)(2)(6). The receptacle should be in a cabinet next to the dishwasher, with the cord routed through a hole in the cabinet.


Cheers, Wayne
 
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