Can a Watts 50080 be installed in home with existing dedicated return loop?

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Bondospecial

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Hello forum, I own a 1964-built 3,000 sq ft ranch home in Connecticut. I DIY-installed a Watts 50080 today to try to alleviate how long it takes hot water to get to the master bathroom through 3/4" copper through this long house. I got the kit installed, which per the instructions included placing the pump on the hot outlet of the tank and installing a Grundfos valve under the farthest sink. Then it dawned on me - this house has an existing dedicated 3/4" copper return loop to the tank. I am guessing the Grundfos valve is not necessary for me and the way I configured this kit, which was evidently intended for retrofitting to homes that do not have return loops, is not optimal for me.

Since I already own this 50080 kit and can't return it now, can I move the pump to the cold return port at the hot water tank so it is pulling water from the end of the loop, rather than pushing hot water out of the tank, and delete the Grundfos valve? Will I need to add a check valve between the cold (well) water and the domestic hot water tank, or can the Watts recirculator pump just be relocated to the cold return?

I have oil fired domestic hot water.

Thanks

Steve
 
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Bondospecial

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I went ahead and installed the Watts 50080 on my dedicated return loop (pulling from the end of the loop, pushing into the cold return of the tank) and added a swing check valve on the cold water line to prevent backflow, and a 4.5 gallon expansion tank on the water heater side of the check valve to allow for expansion since my understanding is the check valve makes it a closed system.

Question: I plumbed the expansion tank off one leg of a T and used about 10" of 3/4" copper pipe between the T and the tank, to hang it in a convenient location. Is what I did okay? My concern was whether an expansion tank has to be connected perpendicular to flow, or if it doesn't matter if it's on the end of a run. I was worried whether air could be trapped in front of the expansion tank since it won't have flow past it (does this matter?)

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Thanks

Steve
 

Jeff H Young

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no you dont need 2 tanks the one tank would have worked check valve dosent matter as pressure would come around other side and get absorbed by the tank
 

Bondospecial

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no you dont need 2 tanks the one tank would have worked check valve dosent matter as pressure would come around other side and get absorbed by the tank
The other expansion tank in my photo is for my 3 zone oil fired, heating system, it is attached to one of the air scoops on a heating zone.
 

Jeff H Young

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The other expansion tank in my photo is for my 3 zone oil fired, heating system, it is attached to one of the air scoops on a heating zone.
Ok so only one tank but the check valve on the circ line doesnot create a closed system . I thought you said you added a tank due to the check valve
 

breplum

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You have added a "dead leg". Plumbing engineering 101 rules are that any dead leg over 3" is to be avoided on potable water systems due to stagnation.
We typically fully support expansion tanks with site made or mfd strap kit (usually at a wall or ceiling and route piping run to be in the flow zone.
When we do it, we add a shutoff and a hose bibb to allow for easy change out.
Follow exp tank instructions for setting pressure.
 

Bondospecial

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Thanks for the reply, that's what I was worried about (without fully understanding why). Now that I have a name for what I did I did some reading.


It sounds like I almost installed the check valve & expansion tank correctly for the recirculating pump setup I added. The problem being the dead leg length. The 'dead leg' portion of my plumbing was done because it seemed like a nice way to hang the tank and for no other reason. I ordered a tank strap kit and will delete the dead leg and support the tank w/ the bracket per your suggestion.

I just bought 3/4" ball valves w/ drain ports in bulk so when I replumb this I can add one in front of the tank.

Steve
 
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