Bathroom Remodel DWV Plan

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RifRaf

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Why don't you run 2" pipe from the ejector (I assume it's 2" since that's all it would need to be) into your tee? Not directly into the tee since you need to be 10 pipe diameters away from the base of the stack.
Okay... I understand what you are saying now.
So, is there a limit to how far you can run a horizontal section of 2" ejector pump discharge pipe?

Due to other branch drains that connect to the main drain pipe (see image below), I wouldn't be able to connect the 2" ejector pump pipe as stated above due to the "10 pipe diameter distance" rule... but once I get beyond any drain connections that would interfere with the "10 pipe diameter distance" rule, your suggestion is certainly a possibility. That would reduce the amount of 4" pipe that would be needed.
Note: The rubber no-hub connectors are only temporary until this bathroom remodel is complete and the 3" main drain pipe is replaced with 4" drain pipe.
DSCN5319 021.JPG

Another reason I am changing out some of the existing PVC drain pipe is that I believe the wrong connectors were used to connect the 2 branch drains into the main drain. SanTee's (on their back) were used instead of a wye connector with the appropriate elbows. And the branch drain to the far right is not vented (tub drain will gurgle after a few toilet flushes). All of this work was done back in 2008 by a professional licensed plumber that was working for a well know licensed contractor that we hired to remodel our hallway bathroom. At the time, I did not know any better to question their work... but I am going to fix all of this prior to finishing the basement ceiling with drywall.
 
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RifRaf

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I’ve got the next section of this bathroom’s drain pipe for the Lav mocked up and ready for gluing. I used a 2” long sweep 90 going into a 3x2 combo. I followed all “joist boring rules” with regards to running the Lav drain. The wood supports on the branch drain are only being used to maintain spacing and proper slope. Once everything is glued in place, I will remove the wood and install the proper pipe supports.
Lav Drain.JPG

The Lav drain will also serve as a wet vent for the toilet and shower. While the IPC allows for 1 1/2” Lav drain/vent, I chose to install a 2” Lav drain/vent pipe to ensure adequate venting.

Lav drain running into bathroom. The Lav trap arm will connect to a 2” x 1 ½” SanTee. The red arrows indicate the direction on the 2” vent pipe that will join existing vent pipe in the attic… and then exit thru the roof. The large opening above the Lav vent (within the stud layout) will be for a future medicine cabinet (if desired).
Lav Vent.JPG


Since this a small bathroom, I will be installing a 30” vanity with a door and draws. The typical Lav plumbing rough-in would not work due to the space available/layout within the vanity. Since all of the plumbing is new, I am planning to run the supply and drain lines (as shown below) to provide easy access to the supply line shut-off valves.
Vanity Rough-in+.JPG


If everything looks good, I will get this all glued up and move on to the shower drain.
All feedback is greatly appreciated!
 

Jeff H Young

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I cant figure out why there is a cleanout at the combi for the toilet I figured the lav and tub were coming off the santee but op never mentioned changing the layout of bathroom .
Also why use a santee instead of a wye the pumped line need only be 2 inch as john mentioned so rifraf your not providing clear info the pvc does not look the same as the copper work at all
 

RifRaf

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I cant figure out why there is a cleanout at the combi for the toilet I figured the lav and tub were coming off the santee but op never mentioned changing the layout of bathroom .
Also why use a santee instead of a wye the pumped line need only be 2 inch as john mentioned so rifraf your not providing clear info the pvc does not look the same as the copper work at all
Jeff, I apologize for any confusion that my posts may have caused. As I previously mentioned, I am a DIY’er and the terms/statements that I am using in my posts may not be the same as those used by professional plumbers. That is why I have been including photos of my work.

Let’s try and start over. But first, forget any mention about an ejector pump and ejector pump discharge line… as it has nothing to do with the current bathroom remodel + DWV branch I am currently working on.

The reason I am replacing this section of copper drain pipe (shown below) is because it hangs below the floor joists. I want to move this section of drain pipe up into the space between the floor joists.

I also have included photos of the copper drain pipe (prior to removal) and the PVC drain pipe that is being installed in it’s place. Hopefully, you will be able to see that I am duplicating the layout of the copper drain pipe with the PVC drain pipe (but using the correct fittings with the PVC drain).
Copper Drain Pipe.JPG


PVC Drain Pipe.JPG

The red cast iron hub (with the clean-out port) goes thru the basement wall and runs to my septic tank.

A Copper = Main drain branch.
A PVC = Main drain branch.

B Copper = Sanitary Tee into cast iron hub. Connects the main drain line and the bathroom drain line into cast iron hub.
B PVC = Sanitary Tee into cast iron hub. Connects the main drain line and the bathroom drain line into cast iron hub

C Copper = Sanitary Tee connected to 45 degree toilet hub.
C PVC = Wye connected to 45 degree toilet hub.

D Copper = Continuation of bathroom branch drain (Note: Sanitary Tee with cap is not being used).
D PVC = Continuation of bathroom branch drain.

E Copper = Sanitary Tee that is attached to various pipe connectors and runs to the LAV drain.
E PVC = Combo attached to long sweep 90 that runs to LAV drain.

F Copper = Continuation of drain pipe to shower drain.
F PVC = This is where I am now with the installation of the new drain. The rubber cap is just temporarily in place until I install the new section of PVC drain pipe that will run to the shower drain.


Rifraf, The copper was plumbed much different as you can see it would vent much better
I'm just curious... how were you able to determine that the bathroom's copper drain line would vent much better than the PVC drain line I am currently installing.
 
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