Trimming Copper Pipe, Replacing Shut Off Valve

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by DC Newbie, May 27, 2013.

  1. DC Newbie

    DC Newbie New Member

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    Location:
    DC
    I'm in the process of replacing a bathroom vanity, and in order to get it flush against the wall I need to trim back one of the water supply pipes which sticks out too far (pic attached). Plan to replace the shut off valve in the process. As my handle indicates, I'm a newbie at this stuff, but it seems like this is a relatively easy fix. Can I just trim the pipe by a half inch or so using a pipe cutter of some sort? And do I need to do anything to the pipe in order to seat the new valve properly (remove burrs, clean threads)? If soldering is the way to go, then I'll need to bring a plumber in.

    thanks for your assistance.

    Attached Files:

  2. speede541

    speede541 New Member

    Messages:
    124
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay area
    Something that works great for me is a oscillating tool fitted with a Dremel 482 blade. My particular tool is a cheapie pneumatic Harbor Freight unit, but there are a bunch of electric models available from reputable brands.

    This is a great setup for getting at even 2" copper installed in tight confines where a compression-type pipe cutter simply won't fit, and it doesn't rip the edges to shreds like a recip saw.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,279
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    YOu can use anything you want to cut off the tubing, a cutter, small hacksaw, big hacksaw, SawZall, etc. But I would stay away from a reciprocating tool, because they might be difficult to hole in place without damaging the copper before it is cut off.
  4. DC Newbie

    DC Newbie New Member

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    Location:
    DC
    Thanks for the suggestion on the cutting tool. I should clarify that the vanity is not set yet, so I can pull it away from the pipes in the picture, leaving me with space to operate.

    Edited to add: do I even need to take the old compression valve off, or could I just cut the pipe behind it?
    Last edited: May 27, 2013
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    14,787
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    We would use a sleeve puller first to remove the back nut it there was too little space and then a tubing cutter.
    A bit of Emory cloth to smooth the copper before sliding the new compression stops on and then snugging them on with an expandable spanner.

    Sometimes a hacksaw blade, but nothing with power.
  6. DC Newbie

    DC Newbie New Member

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    Location:
    DC
    thanks Terry. Was in line at Home Depot with a tube cutter in my hand when I read this so glad to hear I'm on the right track. Wish me luck!
  7. DC Newbie

    DC Newbie New Member

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    Location:
    DC
    So thanks to everyone's help and encouragement, I managed to swap out the old compression valve, cut the pipe, and install the new valve without too much difficulty. It got a little off kilter in the tightening process, but so far no drips.

    Now to see if this valve fits with the faucet supply lines...just kidding, already checked. I'm learning to think a few steps down the line as part of this renovation project IMAG0408_BURST002_1.jpg .
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