Need assistance of tub/shower location (and type)

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by mediaman, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    I don't quite like to have the grill at a highly visible place (close to the vanity, deck front, etc). I'd rather have it :
    1. below [a], kickplate location
    2. in the closet behind the wall (but may waste closet space since nothing can be put right in front of the grill)
    3. on the ceiling downstairs
    4. at the top of the bulkhead so that it looks like an innocent heat vent (but no way if you want to do something decorative around the bulkhead)

    As for the floor register, you probably can do a toe kick type. If it's on the floor in front of the sink, I'am sure you'll hate it.

    You plan looks very nice. The only thing missing is the place for the towel bar for the shower. There are ones that can go on the shower door. Or you can put it behind the bathroom door. Neither the best location. The most convenient location, IMHO, is either next to the vanity, or on the shower wall. I am not sure if you want to trade a tower or a tall cabinet for a towel bar though. :) If you have a towel warmer somewhere, maybe you can store the folded towels in the tower for shower use. :)

    Another thing to keep in mind is you need at least 24" clearance in front of your toilet bowl. I am not quite sure how to measure since your tub deck is at an angle. That's something you need to consult your contractor.
  2. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    Nothing that I know of. If there is a tub deck, I think most people have the the faucet on the deck. The deck, when tiled, is a stronger platform to secure the faucet than the tub can be. You will also have a wider selection of faucets if you do it on the deck, because there are special requirements from each specific tub what the specs of the faucet needs to have if you do tub mount. Just make sure the faucet neck is long enough to reach into the tub when you do deck mount. :p
  3. suceress

    suceress Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    LA
    Hmm. Deck mount faucet could be good. even if you made a little wall upward on the southern part of the deck you could have the faucet coming out of the wall (halfwall-- not a full wall). I hope that makes sense.
    Sort of like this:
    [​IMG]

    But I think you are thinking of something more like this for the faucet:
    [​IMG]

    I wonder if this tub has enough space where it goes in to wrap around that vent in the bulkhead:
    [​IMG]
    I'm guessing that it does not. It's a huge tub though. 72x72 or so. I'm not even sure if it is a drop-in.

    I wonder if it would be possible to find a tub that is designed to have the faucet in that corner so it would allow you to cut that corner out for the bulkhead. I'm guessing the answer is "no".

    The more I think about it, the more I believe it would be best to have a tub deck that is comfortable for sit and swing to get in. Say you are waiting for the water to get to the right temperature and want to sit on the edge and check the water with your hand before getting in. It's easier to do while sitting. Also, with your wife's loss of feeling in her feet, if she is stepping in, she might not be able to feel the bottom of the tub very well and may have more of a chance of slipping/sliding a bit and could end up hurting herself by falling in a sort of splits on the tub deck (I have done this while getting in and out of a tub before- it sucks). With some well-placed grab bars, I think the sitting entry is easier. Plus, you are less likely to bang your shins on the edge of the deck that way-- unless you have a soft sort or rubberized edge to protect your shins.

    I'm curious at the choice in toilet. Is that toilet cheaper than the Drake II?

    There are many options for towel bars. I know they actually make shower rods for curtains that have extra bars just for towels. I don't know if they make them long enough for the custom shower though. I wonder if there is a type of towel bar that could go on the outside shower wall. I would hesitate to mount one on the glass. I wonder if there is a folding towel bar that can extend out from the wall when it is needed and then fold back to the wall when its not. For instance, It can be flush against the wall and out of the way when nobody needs a towel. Then it can be folded outward so it sticks out so when a person gets out of the shower, they can just grab a towel and fold the bar back to the wall, dry off, and hang the towel back up or put it in the laundry bin.

    There is a rack that folds up:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And one that has bars that swivel in both directions:
    [​IMG]

    I like the bench in the shower, will it have a sort of beveled edge so it will be more rounded rather than being a sharp angle at the front? A curved front can make it more comfortable on the backs of the legs.

    I love the feature on the tub surround thing with the fold-down doors. Where did you find that? I want to put it in Pinterest.

    Rapida, I thought the minimum required distance from the front of the toilet was 21" but that 30" was recommended. According to homerenovations.about.com, the National Kitchen and Bath Association lists it as 21". But I could easily be wrong on that.

    My brain is still in slug mode yesterday. Heat exhaustion is not fun.

    I hope that you find all of the products you need to get this as close as possible to the dream bathroom your wife wanted. I do think its great that you are taking the time to plan and research. It's better to plan ahead and have fewer surprises.
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2013
  4. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    GRILL for air tub blower - Ya, agree too visible a location is a bad idea ( ie large square area_. Kickplate may be easiest route, as other opions, while all good, will require some mini HVAC work, ie vent in bulkhead or in ceiling below bathroom, or into closet behind tub.

    FLOOR REGISTER - I asked my contractor about this and the grill ( and few dozen other things:). We'll see what he says.

    TOWEL BAR

    • Next to shower - Yup, had a good spot for it between vanity and shower, but that got consumed by the tower. Agree I can keep a supply of folded/rolled towels in an open or closed area of that tower.. but no room for a rack.
    • on wall behind the open main entrance door - no room for folding rack, but fixed rack with hooks might work out nice. I like that its out of sight when walking into the bathroom.
    • Near tub - I think fixed or folding racks (thanks for pics) on the wall between toilet and corner unit might work, We saw some wall mounted heated units(!) which looked interesting. Costly toy to run though, and would need a wall plug.
    So that might work - two fixed wallmounted towel racks with hooks, on either side of the make-up unit - heated by tub, not heated by entrance.

    TUB FAUCET LOCATION - We have them on the wall in current set-up- Wife hates it as it splashes all over the place, even with long spout. I thought deck mount (with long spout) would be ideal, but she is pleading with me to please put them on the tub rim. Hmmm. So will need to work with that. (already on thin ice moving away from free standing tub, and then from corner tub !). I contacted some tub mfrs to confirm is faucet can fit on/near side lips. Many do. Placing them on back wall middle, while shown in many pics, is a bad option. While the wife says she doesn't mind climbing into tub to get water running , we'd definitely need to an access door in the closet behind the tub just to get it installed. Sounds too complicated. And front middle is just iin the way. So off to the side is still looking hopeful.

    TOILET- Why not Drake II? , Well, we love Toto, but the one-piece model we liked is $899 here. The St Thomas has similar featues and styling for $349 CDN

    DROP-DOWN SKIRT PANELS - Found them on one the supplier web sites that showroom dealer deals with: See : http://www.apdesignalcidepaquet.com/reguliere_ang.html

    BENCH IN SHOWER - Great idea re beveled/rounded edge !

    LIGHITNG - Right now we have a 3 bulb sconce over the vanity, and a light in the shower. It seems bright enough. Quote from contractor included 6 pot lights ( see sketch below... but I wonder if evn three in the middle would be fine, given we will again also have sconce lights for vanity and a light in shower.

    HEATED FLOORS - Back to that one for a moment - just curious - high install cost aside, how does one typically use this. Ie daily?? turn it on just prior to every bath or shower? .. or is it one all time to avoid cold floors for those 3 am wake calls? Doesn't this get very pricey to operate?



    H6-V005.jpg H6-V005-NOTES.jpg
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  5. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    Wow, nice! What a spa it will be!

    My two more cents:

    Re lighting, since your bathroom will be bigger, you'll need more lights. I can't remember exactly, but I think the standard goes like one can light every 4 ft. For the space you have, 6 cans sounds about right. I don't know how your electrician charges, mine charges $100 per can. So 6 cans will get pretty expensive. An alternative, which I went with, was putting just one ceiling light that holds 4 bulbs, and forego the can lights. (I also have two vanity bars each holding 3 bulbs). And because the light goes all directions, unlike can lights only downwards, you can get the same amount of lighting as the 6 cans. Some of the semi-flush lights look better than a flush type. Well, it's personal preference whether to go with ceiling lights or can lights. Each has advantages and disadvantages.

    I thought you'll need lights around your makeup area, too. Are you going to have vanity lights or in mirror type?

    Re faucet location, I don't know why you don't like to have it close to the vanity. It seems to me that if you have it on the vanity side, then when you sit in the tub you'll have the view of the vanity and the shower, and more open space. If you have it on the toilet side, then you'll be looking at the toilet and a corner of the bathroom when using the tub. But then , at least you are not sitting right next to the toilet. I can't say which is better. It's your call. And it's also a question for the plumber whether one way is more expensive than the other.
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
  6. suceress

    suceress Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    LA
    Hmm.. Do you have a Coburn's or something near you? I wonder if you'd be able to find the Drake for cheaper. Oh wait.. You're in Canada. I forgot that for a moment. I've heard sales tax in some areas is pretty high. A friend in Brampton said something about 14% sales tax. It's 10% over where I live and I thought that was really high. I wonder if you'd be able to find a Drake for less if you looked around, but only if you that is something you would want. I have a Drake 1 rather than 2 and it does great for my family. I think it flushes 900grams. The only time we've ever had clogs was because our septic tank was designed for a one bedroom house instead of 3 and our draining guy never drained the tank all the way so stuff kept backing up.

    I don't know how costly PEX is in that area, but it might be an option for getting the the faucet in a spot you like without having to worry about metal pipes that have to bend and such.

    Glad you like the curved bench seat idea. I have a combination of clumsiness and bad luck so I often find ways to injure myself on the most innocuous things. When I was helping the installers with the Infiltrator system for my septic tank, I managed to find a sharp edge on one of the chambers. I've also managed to cut myself on glass shelves (thus my loathing for them) and the metal part of a paintbrush that secures the bristles. My father had to dull/round all of the corners on the counters and cabinets so I wouldn't hurt myself when I was younger. I had to get a foam cover for my trailer hitch because I kept bruising my shins on it. It's actually pretty funny when I think about it, although not funny at the time I hurt myself. I always laugh later.

    A slightly rounded/beveled edge for the tub might be nice to for when people sit on the edge to get in.

    I like the vanity pictures. The look of the one with towers coming all the way down is nicer, but in practical terms, that reduces the counter space and will have to be caulked around and caulk is not always the easiest to clean. So the one with the cabinets mounted on the wall will be easier to clean around. I also like the lights on the mirrors.

    Have you figured out what the lights will look like? I always like the sconces that have the glass thingamajig going downward-- otherwise they catch dust and bugs.

    I think the number of lights depends on how bright they are.

    Do any of the showrooms have functioning examples of the faucets so you could find out if there is any splash when using them? Maybe if you could find some that don't splash all over that are either deck or wall-mounted, your wife might be happy. Perhaps the shape of the faucet itself might have an impact. I don't really know. I know that the distance to the tub bottom and the shape of the tub will affect the flow of the water.

    Rapida, I think the faucet placement near the vanity was nixxed because of access issues. I know that for the shutoff, I would want it right at the front somewhere that was easy to reach.

    I just had a thought on the shower towel bar. I know I said I was dubious about mounting things on the glass, but I realized that there will be a handle to open the door. Would a handle that doubles as a towel bar get in the way? Perhaps you could find one that is short enough that it wouldn't hit the wall?
    [​IMG]

    Or if you have metal trim at the top of the glass, maybe you could hang a towel rack?
    [​IMG]

    You might have to ask in another thread about how the floor heating thing works. I've heard that it can help some people save $$ on their heating bill for the entire house, but don't really know. When my headache goes away I might look around and see if there are any threads about it already.

    Btw, I'm glad you started this thread because it has been very informative and interesting for me. :)
  7. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    I thought the faucet being in the front on the vanity side would be easier to reach (no need to go pass the toilet). But which way to face when taking a bath is a matter of personal preference.
  8. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    FAUCET LOCATION - Some of the tubs have some sort of headrest (I think I prefer the after-market pillows) on one end only, and weird thicknesses around the lip, all making the facuet placement even more challneging. I am waiting to hear back from the mfr on those models we liked as to confirm what my options are. I do, on refletion, like the faucets back where I had them, by the vanity, thus facing the vanities when using the tub. With the flex tubing, contractor should not care too much wehre we put them as long as there is easy access.

    HEATED FLOOR - I will check other areas of the forum for specifics. Thanks. Spoke to a buddy last night who has heated floors in several bathroomsin home and cottage, and advises the you really dont need the entire floor heated in practice. That is , given one tends to have mats by shower and tub anyway to prevent slips, he finds the only area that needs to be heated is where you stand (or sit) the most, ie small area in front of each sink and toilet. Intersting. He also keep them on 24/7. So I could ask contractor for a revised quote (something less than the excessive $2500), but even if cheaper - still not convinced. Turns out the ensuite is above the laundry room (always warm), and in turn laundry room is above the furnace room. So the ensuite turns out to be in one of the warmest areas of the house. As well, the floor register (at kickplate) is going to end up near my wifes sink, whihc will bring in warm air exactly where its needed. Food for thought.
  9. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Question - Are formal architechtual drawings for a bathroom reno needed (ie should they be insisted upon) or are customer sketches (like the recent ones posted), plus documented scope/details, sufficent, to get a shared understanding on what the contractor intends to build and what a customer expects to be built?
  10. suceress

    suceress Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    LA
    Mediaman, if you have bath mats and the room is usually warm, then it sounds like you might not need in-floor heating. I'm in a single story home and the underside of my house is not closed off so all of my floors are cold-- even the carpet gets cold-- but not as cold as the rest of the floors. And I suppose there are always slippers. Your wife should be wearing them to protect her feet from injury should she accidentally step on something anyway.

    I have no idea on the architectural drawings and such. I have no idea on that. Might need to ask in the Remodeling section of the forum and see if anyone answers.
  11. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    I have a bathroom in the hallway which is now the warmest room in the house (after the master bath was torn out). The tiles on the floor still feel cold (the room underneath is heated). So a warm room itself does not make the tiles warm. Well, the tiles will be warm, to the room temperature. But tiles are good heat conductors, so when warmer feet are on them, they take away the warmth from the feet. My old master bath was an exception, because right underneath its floor there were 3 big heat supply trunks taking off the furnace, and all the supply ducts are over 90 degrees hot (I measured with an IR method) Those supply trunks were the heat source for the floor tiles.

    In your case, mediaman, my guess is that there are not too many heat supply ducts under your bathroom floor, because your furnace is 2 stories down. The floor will be heated but no higher than your thermostat's setting. I don't know whether that's comfortable enough for you. I just know that with all the material at the same temperature, carpet will feel the warmest, followed by vinyl, then wood, and tile will feel the coldest. It's determined by their heat conductivity.

    You probably will be fine with mats. And if you wear socks or slippers you won't feel cold on tiles anyway. As for resale, heated floor is something the buyers would love to have but not willing to pay extra, and it's not something that makes or kills a deal. I wanted it just because I was spoiled by the "free" one (no installation nor operating cost). :)

    If you have all the dimensions marked, you might be able to use your drawing with your contractor. Or you can give them your sketch and description and ask them to make a formal drawing. My contractor actually used my drawing for their permit application, no formal architectural drawings needed. But your current sketch is not sufficient. You need to provide spec for everything - you need a measurement for every single line in your drawing, and 3D specs too (how tall the cabinets are, how tall the mirrors are, how tall the tub deck is, etc). The accuracy of your requirement should be within 1", but don't expect the builder can follow that exactly. Given that the existing corners may not be square, walls may not be parallel, you'd better prepare for 2" margin. Anything that needs to be more accurate you need to have that requirement on paper. Say you want to use a stock sized shower door so the wall next to it should be build accordingly. I'd suggest to ask the shower door manufacturer about the opening requirement, and discuss with your builder.

    One thing I learned after hefty "tuition", is that on your contract all the requirement should be in your own words, or in words/terms you fully understand. Otherwise you nay not be able to use the contract to protect you. I had a window company to measure an existing window and told them to add one of the same size to my new bathroom. They wrote down the measurement of the new window in the contract and I signed it. It turned out their measurement was wrong. I had to buy another window and they would not refund me money for the wrong one, because they ordered what was on the contract. You see, if only I insisted to write down "same size as the existing window" instead of just their measurement on the contract, I would stand a good chance getting my money back.

    There is a saying, "trust, but verify". I think it's perfect for dealing with contractors. Then at least you need to know who is trustworthy and how to verify.
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  12. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    First attempt at a 3d view....

    3d.jpg

    3d-2.JPG

    3d-3.JPG
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2013
  13. suceress

    suceress Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    LA
    Hmm.. Almost looks cramped but I think that is because the tub deck looks deceptively like a wall. Will there be enough space in the bulkhead to get any sort of recessed shelving next to the pipe? Or did you say you planned to add some decorative element to that bulkhead to keep it from looking too plain? Maybe a fake window or a mirror.

    It looks cool though!
  14. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Here are some with color/texture

    Still trying to figure our how to display the tub....

    3d-col-1.jpg

    3d-col-2.jpg
  15. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    Sigh, it does look cramped, especially around the toilet. If everything is drawn to scale, it seems that there is roughly only 1 ft from the toilet bowl to the tub deck at the most narrow point. The toilet is also blocking the front on the tub, making you access the tub from the corner near the vanity, which is kind of awkward.

    mediaman, I know you are happy with most part of this plan. But shouldn't you demand more of a $35-40k bathroom? Maybe it's still better to move the toilet. It may cost $2k more. But $2k is just 5% of $40k. The cost of moving the toilet is in part due to ripping the ceiling downstairs and the repair afterwards. If as you said, it's a laundry room underneath, the damage and repair is localized and limited. If you have an open space down there it will cost more.

    Just the way I'm looking it. All in all, it's still a very nice bathroom, and I am deeply impressed with the way you rendered it in 3D. Which software did you use?

    Now I can think of two ways to improve around the toilet:
    1. choose a smaller tub so that it does not take up that much space.
    2. flip the north and south (or is it east/west?): move the toilet to next to the bulkhead (then you need a square bulkhead) and the makeup area along with it. Move the tub and vanity to the current toilet side. Then you can have a corner tub. Since you are following the floor joist, there won't be too much tear out and you won't have any soffit downstairs. Or you can just flip the toilet and tub, but not the vanity.

    Or you can go with a more drastic change. I still think it's better to have the toilet in a corner instead of in the middle of a bathroom.
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  16. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    STATUS - Excellent timing with the move-the-toilet comment! Contacctor came by yesterday, and even with the toilet in thw current position, there would some 'extra' work to do ( easily $2000) to accomodate the new shower drain location ( as they nned to brreak floors, celings to tied into the new location a few joists over). Options are :

    1) pay the price
    2) redesign and move the shower to a new location (I'd ahve to draw that out)
    3) redesign as pointed out above, take th opportunity to look at some move-the-toilet options ( within the same joist).

    So, I still have some homework to do re more mesauring and creating more 2d and now 3d skteches. I dont know that I can resolve all the issues, but lets see what I come up with. Sure is a pleasure doing it now vs later. the the comments in this thread have been priceless!

    3D SOFTWARE - There are many listed here : http://freshome.com/2010/08/18/10-best-free-online-virtual-room-programs-and-tools/ ; I ended up using SweetHome 3D, based in useability.

    SUPPORTING THE TUB - Hmmmm. more expense??? If I do end up with say a corner tub, the one we like holds up to 90 gallons (One US gallon weighs 8.34 pounds, so an imperial gallon weighs about 20 percent more, or almost exactly 10 pounds). Yikes. Thats 900 pounds full, or 675 lbs 3/4 full. Then add 75 lbs for the tub plus 350 pounds for 2 people @175 ea), so thats about 1100 lbs !!!!!!!!

    What type of reninfocement do I need? New support beams beneath?? Is this normal to do[/B]?? Corner tub would be on inside walls, but over the laundry room, so I do have option re support beams there if needed ( and it happens to be right over an existing support beam in the basement.)

    Currently we have an alcove tub, which I would imagine is half the weight half and hold half the water, so say 40 lbs for the tub 350 lbs for water and 175 for one person, so thats approx 535 lbs right now.
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  17. suceress

    suceress Member

    Messages:
    163
    Location:
    LA
    Which direction to the joists run in your house? I'm guessing north to south?
    How much room do you have if you move the corner tub to the south wall? That angled wall for the bulkhead seems to take up a lot of space.
    I'm glad you found a 3D program on that page. :)
    Any particular reason for a separate shower and tub? Have you considered a corner tub with a shower attachment? Or would that defeat the purpose?

    I'm trying to figure out where the toilet could be moved and not affect the size of the vanity. I almost wonder if a bi-fold door for the bathroom door might give you a little more space, but I don't know if you would want to give up the regular door for that. I would say accordion door, but I honestly don't like the look of those.

    Hmm... tough call on this.

    I honestly don't know about the structural support requirements or how to reinforce the floor. I think that is something an engineer/architect would know.

    I hope you get it figured out.
  18. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    I am assuming the joists run north to south (based on the how the floor register is oriented ( east to west), but I should try to somehow confirm that. Assuming the cost to move the toilet (south to north within the joist) is less that the cost the moving the shower drain, than I have the Plan I option as shown below.

    This one:
    - avoids shower drain movement; moves toilet instead
    - adopts corner tub
    - puts entrance door in a more natural position ( beginning of bathroom)
    - eliminates cramped toilet close to tub
    - reduces size of bulkhead for fireplace vent
    - maximizes storage
    - allows for large shower without moving drain
    - shower accommodates large bench
    - shown as neo angle - complements angle on corner tub - wife not thrilled with that but I think squared off would look worse
    - 6" lip on west and south lips of tub ; 2 "in lip for balance
    - tub faucets in good location
    - bather face bathroom

    Tried to think through some design elements re what to put with walls. Hardest part is the corner tub area.

    Plan I :


    Standard 2D view:

    i7-floor.JPG

    3D View from the south:
    i7a.jpg

    3D View from the north:
    i7b.jpg

    3D View from the west:
    i7-w-e.JPG

    3D View from the east:
    i7-e-w.JPG
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  19. mediaman

    mediaman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Here is a first attempt at a video version : [video]https://www.dropbox.com/s/5miajxrizlkdfa1/I7.mov[/video]
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013
  20. rapida

    rapida New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    mn
    mediaman, the new plan looks better! I like the movie too!

    Here are a few of my thoughts:

    1. With the door on a wider wall, do increase its width! I am still stronly for a wide door. You don't see a multi-million dollar house with a narrow enetrance (ok, I'm not talking about Manhattan), same that you don't enter a $4k bathroom through a 24" door. I'd say the minimum is 30". You should have enough clearance to put one in your new plan. I'll never use a bi-fold as a bathroom door, though. In some cases, a French door is ok, but a French door needs to lead to a wide open space, which is not your case.

    2. After seeing it in 3d, now I understand why your wife didn't like to have the tub and shower side by side. With shower and tub on one side and the vanity on the other side, the bathroom looks like a tunnel. In your case a neo angle shower is a must, otherwise the traffic does not flow. The shower door can be either on the long side or the neo side, depending on personal preference. I'd like to have it on the long side.

    3. Is your shower 36" wide and vanity 21" wide? If so that's fine. If you want a bigger shower, just make sure there is at least 36" between your shower and the vanity. You'll need that space to move around the bathroom smoothly. Whether that 36" is measured from the glass panel or the shower curb, well, I think eithe way is fine. I'd measure from the curb. 36" is more than code requirement, I'm just thinking about comfort here. :)

    4. You may not need re-inforcement to support your corner tub. 1100 lbs is not that bad. A 60x32 cast iorn tub can be 450 lbs itself. Do you have any unfinished ceiling to look at how tall are the floor joists? I think the most common joists are trusses measuring like 2 X 10". Whether that's sufficient for your load depends on the joist span, the space between joists, and the type of wood your joists are made of. To be on the safe side, you need a enginner to look at that, not just any contractor. If the company you are working with has an engineer on the team, that will be great. If nothing's in the way, and they can reach the beam, maybe the contractor can add a few more joists in between the old ones to strengthen the floor. But whether it needs to be done, and how to get it done, will certainly depend on the particular situation of your house.
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2013
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