Want a warm cellar

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by capecod12, Oct 13, 2014.

  1. capecod12

    capecod12 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2014
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Cape Cod
  2. Dana

    Dana In the trades

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Location:
    01609
    The high-fire BTU numbers are almost 2x my home's 99th percentile heat load. Do you know what the low-fire BTU numbers are for that unit? (The Carrier website isn't very informative,- either that or they have it well hidden.)

    Have you done an actual load calculation on your place?
     
  3. capecod12

    capecod12 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2014
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    No, we didn't do the actual measuring and trying to remember the insulation factors. House has been added to and we now have a sunroom and a larger upstairs. The people who gave us estimates are familiar with this kind of house and climate, so we pretty much have to rely on them.

    When we first moved in here coming up on 49 years ago, the trees were very small, and the wind off the ocean was a lot higher than we get here now. You can't even see the ocean from our roof any more.

    If the furnace is a bit large for what its plan is now, thats OK, as we plan eventually to retire the oil one and move this one over to its place and hook it up to the existing ductwork. Our son in law said he could do it easily.
     
  4. Dana

    Dana In the trades

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Location:
    01609
    To do a heat load calculation correctly involves a bit of sleuthing on the details, but it's not an all-day affair. There's no such thing as "this kind of house" that would make it possible to size it properly on a WAG.

    Then again, it looks like yours is the smallest in the series, even if it does turn out to be oversized. The 37K-BTU/hr low-fire output of the thing would still have me covered at +5F, but not by a large margin.

    You may be pleasantly shocked at how much cheaper it is to heat with condensing gas than with oil.
     
  5. DonL

    DonL Jack of all trades Master of one

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Occupation:
    Rocket Scientist
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    You can calculate all day long.

    The real world experience is a bit different.


    There are to many variables in the formula, unless you are in a vacuum.
     
  6. capecod12

    capecod12 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2014
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    Yes, its too difficult to do calculations like this, our cellar also has a leaky garage door. Im not sure of all your terms?
    So rather than go into tons of math and measurements, we decided to go with what was recommended, and we pushed it up a notch or 2.
    And I know that it will be cheaper than oil, and coal on cape cod is very expensive. We just sold our second coal stove yesterday to somebody on the mainland.

    The 'smallest in the series' link won't open? http://www.americancoolingandheating.com
    Perhaps the url is wrong.
    Anyway, hope we have made the correct choice, or at least close. And all your information has been extremely helpful! More later,,,,,,
     
  7. Dana

    Dana In the trades

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    Location:
    01609

    Hmmm... the link in my post works for me (using FireFox). Maybe a copy & paste will work better (the hyphen may screw it up in some web browsers?) :

    http://www.americancoolingandheatin...r-product-data-specifications/59TN6A-02PD.pdf

    (edit: The forum tool automatically made it into a hyperlink- if that link doesn't work, maybe editing out the "http" through the "www" will let you cut & paste:

    .americancoolingandheating.com/wp-content/uploads/carrier-product-data-specifications/59TN6A-02PD.pd

    You don't have to push it "up a notch or 2" unless your house is unusually large or unusually leaky. The smallest in the 59TN6Axxxxxxx line is the 060V17-14, which at high fire could keep a code-min 2500'-3000' house warm down at -50F or so. Even with an older house that isn't up to current code for R values/U-factors you have PLENTY of margin.

    What you get with the 2- stage is that it won't short cycle or overshoot, even if it's a bit oversized at the high-fire end, and it'll pull you through a Polar Vortex event without any trouble at all.
     
  8. capecod12

    capecod12 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2014
    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    Odd that with all browsers and changing the url won't bring it in for me, but some servers are down this morning, our local newspaper also of all odd things.

    Probably tomorrow those 2 sites will work. I remember when my site was down, and my web host was all upset and bombarded us with apology emails. But mine is just fun, so no worries for me, but a newspaper one must be hurting.

    Our garage door does leak a bit and points north, so that could effect things a bit. But I am hoping we did make the right choice. Lovely warm weather now, but last winter was rather cold, 3 winters ago it was one of our warmest on record here.
     
Similar Threads: warm cellar
Forum Title Date
HVAC Heating & Cooling Radiant heat isn't able to keep master bedroom over garage warm. Dec 21, 2019
HVAC Heating & Cooling Regulating Radiant Heat in Warm Condo Nov 22, 2016
HVAC Heating & Cooling Warm board and radient heating Dec 11, 2012
HVAC Heating & Cooling Hydronic Towel Warmer Nov 9, 2008
HVAC Heating & Cooling Towel warmer Nov 3, 2008

Share This Page