Redoing solder joint

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DirtyJerz

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Just practicing for now. Could not get the solder to melt with water soluble flux. Tried the petroleum based one and decided to screw it and keep heating until the solder melted. Lo and behold, turned out great.

Now I want to try again with the water soluble stuff so I can comply with code. Took the joint apart. What do people think about leaving some of the solder behind? No bueno?

212B4122-604A-410A-8450-71A220D6E6DA.jpeg
 

Reach4

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If the new fitting goes over the pipe, no problem.
 

Fitter30

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Don't want to burst your bubble but a good joint doesn't have copper showing. Did you touch the cleaned copper with a bare finger? Always wear cloth gloves. Have no experience with water base flux. RectorSeal Nokorode regular flux with a acid brush to put it on is my go to but do very little potable water. Using lp or mapp gas torch? Mapp is hotter and will heat the fitting faster. Solder flows to heat. To much heat is just as bad of not enough.
 
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Weekend Handyman

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Solder up a ‘P’ with a boiler drain on the bottom. Hook it up to your garden hose and pressurize it to see if your joints are good.
 

DirtyJerz

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That picture was taken after a good amount of sanding with 150. Was just trying to figure out whether I needed to keep going. When I initially took the fitting off, both fitting and pipe were completely silver.

Reach4 had the right idea though. Fitting won’t go on at the moment so I guess I’ll keep sanding.
 

DirtyJerz

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Yep I’m using the tinning flux for both water and oil based.

The water one burns up real fast. No idea what Oatey says about it being good up to 700 degrees, pretty sure all of it burns up shortly after you reach the melting point of the solder.
 

DirtyJerz

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Probably just too much flux. I’m just doing a thin layer on the pipe and fitting, but after putting them together, I guess I should wipe off the excess? In terms of width of flux on the pipe, I should be doing less than the width of the fitting?
 

Reach4

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I wonder if you can reheat, and wipe the solder off with a cloth. Cotton, or some other non-synthetic I am thinking. Normally I would want to do that before any sanding.
 

Fitter30

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I wonder if you can reheat, and wipe the solder off with a cloth. Cotton, or some other non-synthetic I am thinking. Normally I would want to do that before any sanding.
Cotton rag works the best , synthetic is made from plastic and will melt. Capping the joint will fill and gaps at the edge of the fitting. Takes practice to get the heat just right.
 
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