Help Identify these drains and covers?

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Ed53511

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As previously shared, I bought a home that used to be a fire department built in 1960. I hope you can help me identify these drains/access holes to find the right threads/adapters/covers.


1st is a Brass Drain in a pit in the garage. I am filling in the pit and installing concrete. However the flat roof drains into the pit and then down the brass drain. I thought it was a 2" pipe thread but the 2" Brass Pipe I bought at the local big box store is too small. It measures nearly 2-1/2" to the threads. Can you tell me what pipe adapter I might need to adapt the PVC from the roof straight to the drain inlet before I fill it in/concrete it?

2nd is an access hole to a clean-out. The access hole cover is missing and it creates a trip hazard. I purchased every size plug/cover Menards has to try to ensure I had the correct cover. None of them fit. Can you tell me which plug/cover I need?

3rd is a leaking faucet. When it is in the open status the stem dribbles a pretty good stream and after a while causes a good size puddle. Can anyone identify the faucet and or share a diagram of the parts and how to tighten or replace the seal?

Thanks in advance. You were all so helpful with the bathroom faucets and I appreciate that. I hope you can provide an equal amount of insight to these issues also.

Thanks

Ed
 

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Marlinman

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Ed53511

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The wall hydrant looks to be Woodford model 8

Cleanout cover looks like Wade 8000-12 ductile top. Diameter is 5 1/2" I can't tell the height (Thickness)

I'm not really understanding the 1st photo. If the goal is to cover the hole a floor cleanout cover shound do fine.
51W7E4EoBAL.jpg
The first picture is a drain in the bottom of a trough or pit. The bottom of the drain is threaded. I thought it was brass but after closer inspection, it appears it might be cast iron.

I tried a 2” npt/mip nipple but it was too small. The threaded diameter is about 2-1/2" +/-??? The new pictures show a 2" PVC pipe and you can see clearance.

I am trying to pipe the roof drain straight to the pit drain. And then fill in the pit. So I need a male threaded adapter to thread into the pit drain so I can then add a union to couple the roof drain pvc to direct connect the roof drain to the pit drain instead of running the roof rainwater into the pit. So that I can eliminate the pit. I hope that adds clarity.

I also attached another of that floor hole with the missing cover. The hole is the location for the cleanout access. There used to be a threaded cover plate to the floor access but it is now missing/destroyed. The cleanout access is perfectly fine and all there including its own threaded cover/plug (whatever you call it). I need to find another plug/cover for the floor hole access to avoid a tripping hazard. It is literally in the middle of a walking path in the garage.

You nailed the Wall Hydrant. That is exactly what it is. Now I have to figure out how to stop the dribbling. It feels like the stem is loose because it wobbles a bit.

I have several of those types of "Faucets" on the exterior of the building. This particular faucet/hydrant is on the interior of the building (it used to be exterior when the building was first built. But they added on since then). There is a key required to open and close these valves/faucets. Now because of the literature you shared, maybe I can add a handle to the interior one.

Thank you for all of your help and insight. It is greatly appreciated.
 

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John Gayewski

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The threaded portion of that drain is for height adjustment during construction. It's going to be a size that isn't adaptable to pipe. Are you saying that the roof runoff is 2"? That seems excessively small for a roof drain. Like 2 pipe sizes too small for a roof drain. Also closing off access to the trap may not be a great idea. Is there a reason this pipe can't be routed to a gutter in the street? Does your local municipality allow storm runoff into the sanitary sewer? That's not common.

The cleanout can be any number of things including the chrome cover mentioned above. I think cutting a custom stainless plate might be more ridgid.

The faucet is kind of self explanatory once you get a rebuild kit just reassemble the way you took it apart.
 

Ed53511

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The threaded portion of that drain is for height adjustment during construction. It's going to be a size that isn't adaptable to pipe. Are you saying that the roof runoff is 2"? That seems excessively small for a roof drain. Like 2 pipe sizes too small for a roof drain. Also closing off access to the trap may not be a great idea. Is there a reason this pipe can't be routed to a gutter in the street? Does your local municipality allow storm runoff into the sanitary sewer? That's not common.

The cleanout can be any number of things including the chrome cover mentioned above. I think cutting a custom stainless plate might be more ridgid.

The faucet is kind of self explanatory once you get a rebuild kit just reassemble the way you took it apart.
Thank you for your insight and comments.

The roof drain is 3”. However, the roof drain drains into the trough/pit and then discharges from the trough via that 2-1/2" opening in that drain. The trough does not get backed up even in the most hostile torrential rains found in southern Wisconsin.

I am by no means at any level a qualified plumbing expert. But the fact that water drains out of the trough through the hole in the drain suggests to me that the 2" would be ample enough to handle that water from the roof.

We did reroute the roof drain once to discharge it out of the building. However, the street is too far away from the building. The result was ice damn(s) forming on the driveway and then backing up into the discharge pipe. And then freezing in the discharge pipe causing a backup of water in the room and then leaking into the building.

Our local municipality codes do not allow storm runoff into the sanitary sewer. Fortunately, that is not what is happening so it is not a concern.

I will not be closing off access to the trap. I will be forming an access cavity surrounding the drain.

Is there any chance you provide me with the brand or documentation about the drain? Hopefully, I could familiarize myself with the drain to figure out the best way to accomplish the connection.


The cleanout once had a thread cover/plug. It got destroyed during the removal once in order to access the cleanout. At that time we did not think it was a non-common part and thought it would be easily replaceable. I am hoping someone can tell me what diameter/brand/type/etc... threaded plug or threaded cover is required to replace it so I can remove the tripping hazard.

I ordered the parts for the faucet and I found the installation instructions. As well as a video. So I think that issue will be easily resolvable.
 
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John Gayewski

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There is a trap but it's not a sanitary drain?

Are you sure your roof isn't dumping the extra water around your building instead of flowing down the drain?
 

Ed53511

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There is a trap but it's not a sanitary drain?

Are you sure your roof isn't dumping the extra water around your building instead of flowing down the drain?
Lol… I am sure.

The building has a 3 zone, flat contained roof with with primary drains and overflow drains.

If you want to stop by I would be glad to give you a tour.

In the mean time, do you have any info you could share with me about the brands/models/part numbers/sizes/etc… pertaining to my requests/questions?

As always thank you for your insight.
 

John Gayewski

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Not really. The go to for engineers right now is Jay R. Smith floor drains and cleanouts, but I don't know what was commonly spec'd in the 60's, and these don't quite look the same.

It looks like the threads are broke in the cleanout so I would either replace them both (which considering your project isn't that much work) or find some kind of work around.
 
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