Exploding Water Heaters -- Traps Going Up - IPC IAMPO

Discussion in 'Plumbing Code Questions' started by TheOverThinker, Aug 28, 2020.

  1. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    IL
    Seems to address the concern that water or sediment would be sitting long term on the valve. The coil is interesting. Required, or just what this plumber used? Periodic testing of the T&P valve would need to include making sure that water was making it thru the coil.

    I assume there is a threaded joint/ union, hidden by the insulation in the photo, that makes changing the T&P practical.
     
  2. TheOverThinker

    TheOverThinker Member

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    Berkeley, CA
    [QUOTE="Reach4, post: 649769, member: 61511"The coil is interesting. Required, or just what this plumber used? Periodic testing of the T&P valve would need to include making sure that water was making it thru the coil.[/QUOTE]

    The coil is part of the requirement.
    For drainage, so the pipe is dry.
    For heat exchanging, to lower the temperature of any discharge steam.

    The code requirement has the pigtail tube crimped slightly at the bottom, but frankly that seems stupid as it will more likely clog.

    There's a union.
    Someone else pointed out there's also a brass extension tube. That's not part of the design and I will look into why that was placed. The T part of the TPR needs to be in the tank. A short extension tube is unlikely to be fatal, but seems wrong regardless.
     
  3. wwhitney

    wwhitney Well-Known Member

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    Berkeley, CA
    Can you read the model number? Maybe it's the extra long probe version. : - )

    Cheers, Wayne
     
  4. wwhitney

    wwhitney Well-Known Member

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    Berkeley, CA
    Can you cite a written code that describes your installaiton?

    Cheers, Wayne
     
  5. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

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    Occupation:
    plumbing - fire suppression - boiler inspector
    Location:
    New York
    "The code requirement has the pigtail tube crimped slightly at the bottom, but frankly that seems stupid as it will more likely clog."


    This is why at least 80% of safety and relief and T&P valves discharge is wrong

    504.6 Requirements for Discharge Piping

    The discharge piping serving a pressure relief valve, temperature relief valve or combination thereof shall:
    1. Not be directly connected to the drainage system.
    2. Discharge through an air gap located in the same room as the water heater.
    3. Not be smaller than the diameter of the outlet of the valve served and shall discharge full size to the air gap.
    4. Serve a single relief device and shall not connect to piping serving any other relief device or equipment.
    5. Discharge to the floor, to the pan serving the water heater or storage tank, to a waste receptor or to the outdoors.
    6. Discharge in a manner that does not cause personal injury or structural damage.
    7. Discharge to a termination point that is readily observable by the building occupants.
    8. Not be trapped.
    9. Be installed so as to flow by gravity.
    10. Not terminate more than 6 inches (152 mm) above the floor or waste receptor.
    11. Not have a threaded connection at the end of such piping.
    12. Not have valves or tee fittings.
    13. Be constructed of those materials listed in Section 605.4 or materials tested, rated and approved for such use in accordance with ASME A112.4.1.
    NOTE: Number 11 When I install a water heater the discharge pipe copper/ black pipe or other I cut the end at an angle more like a 45 DEG reason being there is no possibility of someone placing any restrictions on the end even on small boilers safety or relief valves
     
  6. TheOverThinker

    TheOverThinker Member

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    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    WATER HEATER INSTALLATION IN A BASEMENT - REQUIREMENTS

    Follow these specifications outlined and illustrated below when installing a water heater in a basement:

    1. 3/4” tee with 1/8” reducer
    2. 1/8” tubing, drip coil with slightly crimped end
    3. 3” minimum slab or base
    4. 3/4” union within 12”
    5. Hot water line (insulated first 5’)
    6. Cold water line with shutoff valve (insulated first 5’)
    7. Terminate not less than 6” and not more than 24” at exterior
    8. Gas supply line with sediment trap, downstream of shutoff valve
    9. 3/4” CPVC or copper tubing, 1/4 per foot slope toward termination
    10. Seismic straps, listed for size or use 24g straps (50gal: 2 straps, 75gal: 3 straps, 100gal: 4 straps)
    11. Vent connector: Single appliance vent with maximum horizontal length 75% of vertical for single wall, 100% for b-vent
    12. Expansion tank if required per CPC 608.3

    https://www.sanjoseca.gov/home/showdocument?id=26033

    Water Heater TPR Going Up Code Legal California.PNG

    I know that document from Berkeley California and San Jose California, but not where it originated. Any idea who cooked that up?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2020
  7. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Occupation:
    plumbing - fire suppression - boiler inspector
    Location:
    New York
  8. wwhitney

    wwhitney Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    From a performance point of view, what is your criticism of the solution?

    Your experience and expertise would be more appreciated without the pot shots at California.

    Cheers, Wayne
     
    Tuttles Revenge likes this.
  9. TheOverThinker

    TheOverThinker Member

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    Aug 20, 2019
    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
    Pretty sure this is plumbing not politics.
    Pretty sure the water still spins down the drain the same way on the left coast.
     
    Sylvan likes this.
  10. Tuttles Revenge

    Tuttles Revenge In the Trades

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2014
    Water Heater TPR Going Up Code Legal California.PNG

    13. Provide a Pressure Relief valve operating at 125 PSI that drains to the exterior or to appropriate building drain

    One thing I don't understand is why there isn't a requirement to have a separate pressure relief valve operating at lower pressure in the building somewhere that can drain to gravity. That is how we do them in that situation. Seems like that would be completely obvious.

    *somehow i managed to leave politics out of my reply*
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
    Sylvan likes this.
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