Connecting PEX faucet riser to kitchen/bath faucet

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Marzec

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Believe it or not I couldn't find any good info on this online. It's probably such basic knowledge to most plumbers, but as a DIY'er who hasn't worked with this type of supply line before, I want to be 100% sure I'm using the correct parts. Anyway, I am rehabbing 4 of my apartments over the next couple of months. In the past I have generally used the flexible SS braided supply lines for the kitchen and bathroom sink faucets. As a more cost effective solution, I would like to use the inexpensive gray PEX flexible supply lines (pictured below) going forward. These seem to be very reliable supply lines and a much more cost effective approach.

My question is what are the best nuts to use to connect this supply line to the faucet? I know how to properly connect the supply line to the valve using the plastic ferrule and 3/8" compression nut, but I couldn't find good info on how to properly connect it to the faucet. Can the nuts that sometimes come with the faucets be used? I am purchasing certified refurbished Delta kitchen faucets and I don't believe any supply line connection nuts were included. Should I purchase the plastic faucet tailpiece nuts from Home Depot or would a brass nut be better? I have a lot of extra 1/2" brass plumbing nuts laying around...can those be used for this? And finally, is there any more to this magical connection than just using a nut to compress the cone shaped plastic end into the threaded opening on the faucet?
 

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WorthFlorida

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It's all in my opinion. Both work well but I prefer SS hoses.

The one you pictured is for a toilet. For faucets is shown below. A 12 inch riser , SS braided is $6.45 at HD. After you buy the raiser, nuts and compression fittings, I'll cost the same or more. Older faucets used to come with the compression nut on the faucet side. I haven't seen them in a while. Higher grade faucets have the PEX permanently built into the faucet body. Others use the 1/2 threaded connection at the faucet. The valve end on pex is a compression fitting that takes some skill when using on pex. The SS hoses are two easy connections.



1694374656284.png
 

Marzec

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It's all in my opinion. Both work well but I prefer SS hoses.

The one you pictured is for a toilet. For faucets is shown below. A 12 inch riser , SS braided is $6.45 at HD. After you buy the raiser, nuts and compression fittings, I'll cost the same or more. Older faucets used to come with the compression nut on the faucet side. I haven't seen them in a while. Higher grade faucets have the PEX permanently built into the faucet body. Others use the 1/2 threaded connection at the faucet. The valve end on pex is a compression fitting that takes some skill when using on pex. The SS hoses are two easy connections.



View attachment 93927
Thanks for your advice. I definitely see your point. However, in my situation I need at least some 20" and 24" supply lines which cost almost $9 at HD. And since I have so many to do if I purchase the PEX lines in bulk (25) they are only $1.12 a piece. But yes, I will have to purchase some nuts. I posted the same picture you did, but without expanding it, it looks cut off almost like a toilet supply line. I have experience with copper compression fittings. I'm mainly just trying to understand the connection at the faucet using the PEX supply lines and wondering if there's anything special about the nuts that need to be used, or if just standard 1/2" brass plumbing nuts or plastic faucet nuts can be used.
 

WorthFlorida

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Standard stuff is ok. When installing the PEX raisers and make the compression fittings, give a good tug on the raisers to be sure the compression fittings are tight. I one time did use the Pex for a toilet. Later that night the raiser slipped out of the compression fittings. Fortunately, my teenage son was home and shut the water off. I've used nothing but braided hose since.
 

Jeff H Young

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1/2 inch nuts supplied with faucets are pretty standard. whatever you use for an angle stop make sure its compression or not slip joint cone washers
 

WorthFlorida

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Google search:
Others want to know:

Can compression fittings be used on PEX?

Compression fittings can be used with smaller-size PEX and other non-rigid polyethylene tubing (i.e. LLDPE), provided that: 1. Only plastic sleeves/rings (such as Delrin/POM) are used.

Notice the brass sleeves below. I'm' not sure if they are needed for PEX lines But doesn't hurt. Perhaps others can answer it. Definitely when the water line to a refrigerator were plastic, like nylon. The ring must be tapered.


1694390855252.png
 

John Gayewski

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Get the ss flex hoses. To actually "properly" attach those pex connectors they need to be attached to an anchor by the time you properly anchor then properly connect them your at a wash. If they aren't properly anchored they blow apart. Our company actually flooded a hotel and had to file an insurance claim to rent the unusable part of the hotel and pay for all of the repairs, all because one of these blew apart.

The only ones of these that should be used are the ones that come already attached to a kitchen faucet as they have the ferrule molded into it.

Your talkong about saving dollars and risking bouillon. Our company policy is not to use these. We now happily spend the extra couple of dollars and sleep tight knowing that the hundreds we install in a year won't cause a flood.
 

Marzec

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Google search:
Others want to know:

Can compression fittings be used on PEX?


Compression fittings can be used with smaller-size PEX and other non-rigid polyethylene tubing (i.e. LLDPE), provided that: 1. Only plastic sleeves/rings (such as Delrin/POM) are used.

Notice the brass sleeves below. I'm' not sure if they are needed for PEX lines But doesn't hurt. Perhaps others can answer it. Definitely when the water line to a refrigerator were plastic, like nylon. The ring must be tapered.


View attachment 93934
The PEX lines come with the plastic ferrule already slipped onto the line. The barcode tag is attached to the line so the ferrule doesn't slip off until the customer removes the tag prior to installation.
 

Marzec

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Get the ss flex hoses. To actually "properly" attach those pex connectors they need to be attached to an anchor by the time you properly anchor then properly connect them your at a wash. If they aren't properly anchored they blow apart. Our company actually flooded a hotel and had to file an insurance claim to rent the unusable part of the hotel and pay for all of the repairs, all because one of these blew apart.

The only ones of these that should be used are the ones that come already attached to a kitchen faucet as they have the ferrule molded into it.

Your talkong about saving dollars and risking bouillon. Our company policy is not to use these. We now happily spend the extra couple of dollars and sleep tight knowing that the hundreds we install in a year won't cause a flood.
I haven't seen anything about anchoring these PEX lines to anything during the course of my research. I have removed them in the past when doing a rehab and don't recall them being "anchored". Can you explain what you mean by being anchored?

I get your point though. I just don't know the statistics of what type of supply line fails more often than the others. Everyone has had a bad experience with something and the problem with that is it's all anecdotal. I've also read about SS hose failures, but again, it's anecdotal. I would imagine that all of these lines when installed properly are meant to last at least as long as the valve and faucet. And when those fail, usually by an unfixable drip, the supply lines are also changed out.
 

Jeff H Young

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I dont know statistics Ive heard of every kind of supply line leaking Id trust any of them more than Pex suppys because Ive used them less not that Ive heard more horror storys I only see them on old trailers or Mobile homes or manufactured homes whichever name you call them. no one I know uses them , They could be the best thing out there but I just dont use them I have my own on my truck So why use those?
 

WorthFlorida

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A long time ago I changed, when it comes to electric and plumbing, do not go the cheapest route.

Two years ago when I changed my homeowner's insurance company, an inspector came to the home and took pictures, mostly under the sinks. Other than fire damage, water leaks is probably the second highest for cost. Water does incredible damage throughout the home. I know two families that had a major leak. It's 3-6 months before they could move back into the home.

Google search, This the % of claims, not cost.
Wind damage, usually roofs or trees falling on homes.

What are the most common home insurance claims?
  1. Wind & hail (45.5% of claims) ...
  2. Fire and lightning damage (23.8% of claims) ...
  3. Water Damage & Freezing (19.9% of Claims) ...
  4. All other property damage (7.9% of claims) ...
  5. Bodily injury or property damage to others (2% of claims) ...
  6. Theft (0.6% of claims)
 
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Jeff H Young

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I cant tell you what we went through selling my Moms home in Palm Coast My Mom had passed almost a year ago so house wasent owner occupied hours and days to get insured in the middle of Storm season we couldnt afford to let it lapse plus there was a mortgage . Wound paying thousands for a few weeks coverage because we had a 50 percent non refundable clause
 
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