Compression Shutoff + Jagged Pipe

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cbass84

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Hello,
I removed a compression shut off valve for a sink faucet. The pipe was jagged like it was cut with a hacksaw instead of a pipe cutter.
I will need to cut off the jagged portion or does it not matter?
Seems that in this case it's possible it might make a watertight connection, but perhaps not?
I would prefer to keep the shut of valve body if possible as there is copper line soldered to the valve that feeds the faucet.
From searching posts on here it looks like I will need more than just a new olive/ferrule. I will also need a new compression nut and should not reuse the old one? Do I understand that correctly?
Or should I abandon the idea of reusing the valve and get a new one and redo the faucet connection?

Thanks
 

Reach4

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Reusing the old olive/ferrule and nut is fine, as long as the nut is cosmetically acceptable and fits.

If replacing the olive/ferrule and nut, if the new olive fits, end jaggedness is not going to hurt. If the jaggedness was inside, you would want to smooth that to help the flow.
 

cbass84

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Thank you for the response.

I removed it because it was leaking (seeping).
I used a ferrule puller to remove the old olive.
I put on a new olive that I bought at Home Cheapo.
I reused the old nut and valve and there is still a seep.

Now I am considering my options.
I can cut that small section of jagged pipe after pulling the olive and trying with another new olive.
Putting pipe dope or teflon tape on the olive and trying my luck.
Trying a new nut along with a new olive.
Cutting my losses at a repair attempt and just getting a brand-new valve and redoing connection to the faucet.

If the valve is brasscraft, then does the olive also need to be from brasscraft? It looks like the olive design is the same for all brands? I just picked up an everbilt brand olive as that is what the big box store had in stock.
 

Reach4

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I had assumed that you replaced the valve body.

Use one wrench on the nut, and one wrench on the valve body. Use wrenches that are longer if space permits.

First, try tightening the nut by 1/4 turn if you can. If you cannot do 1/4, do what you can. I think that, at least for me, crushing the pipe is not a concern. I am not a plumber.

If that does not stop the leak, I suggest unscrewing the nut, lubricating the threads and the olive, and tightening the nut. If you have a leak, tighten another 1/8 turn. Repeat as needed.
 

cbass84

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I don't think I crushed the pipe as I was under a cabinet with an adjustable wrench with a short 8 inch handle, but I have always been curious what happens if I did crush the pipe or encounter one in the future with a crushed pipe. I assume at that point there is no choice but to cut off the section with the crushed pipe? Are there any other options? Doing a search on here it seems that some have had luck installing a push fit fitting like a shark bite over the crushed pipe instead of using a compression seal. Is that correct?

It sounds like the advice here is to try my luck by tightening more. It sounds like there is hope for a seal by just tightening more.
Lubricate the olive with what? PIpe dope?
 

Reach4

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I was afraid of crushing a pipe with a compression. I cut it out, and looked at it. Nowhere close to being crushed.

Lubrication... I like silicone grease because I have some. But I expect olive oil or liquid dish detergent. would be good. Maybe petroleum jelly. And you can even use pipe dope (sealant). Maybe the sealant properties would help. And now that I think of it, I actually used pipe dope, rather than one of those others.
 

Caliber_Plumbing

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If the pipe end is jagged or uneven, it's a good idea to cut off the jagged portion and create a clean, straight end.
When making a compression connection, it's generally recommended to use new components, including the compression nut and ferrule (olive).
 

cbass84

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If the pipe end is jagged or uneven, it's a good idea to cut off the jagged portion and create a clean, straight end.
When making a compression connection, it's generally recommended to use new components, including the compression nut and ferrule (olive).

Does that mean you recommend I just replace the entire valve and figuring out redoing the faucet connection?
 

Reach4

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That is what he recommends, but what if you are an environmentalist? ;-)

Seat and washer will be easier if your plumbing/hardware store can provide, and if you like the faucet.
 

cbass84

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Thank you for all the input. I have decided to update this for the future. I had two valves that were not sealing. The first was just a slight weep and taking a longer wrench and tightening down on the nut seems to have solve the problem. The other one with the jagged pipe I was more concerned as it was an obvious drip. Tightening only resulted in a faster drip so things were getting worse. I unscrewed the nut from the valve and looked at the new ferrule. There was no crushing on the pipe. I decided to try my luck by wrapping the ferrule/olive about 7 times or so with teflon tape. This eliminated the drip. I will monitor both and see what happens.
 
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