Baking carbon filter?

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Beets

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I intentionally ran my H2O2 dry before switching pails. After I switched, I had strong H2S odor even after I got the H2O2 back to the intended concentrations. Darn. Been here before.

I opened my big blue filter, and it was full of pink slime. Some of you may recall me posting pictures of having gallons of slime in my retention tank (after H2O2) and how I tested the slime against various concentrations of H2O2, and how they seemed to thrive in 100 ppm H2O2. You may recall that I inject H2O2 ahead of the big blue, pressure tank, retention tank, and Centaur carbon filter. I believe the slime is a combination of black SRB's and pink Serratia marcescens, but those are just educated guesses.

To get rid of the smell, I added about 1/3 gallon bleach to the big blue filter, and led it run through my system. Waited a day and the smell was worse. The next evening, I then added about a half a liter of H2O2 to the top of my retention tank and back flushed twice. I then added about 1/3 gallon bleach to top of retention tank, and I back flushed twice. After this operation, the smell was gone.

Based on this experience and others, I believe the smell happens when my carbon gets slimed. Running bleach forward through the system doesn't seem to help. It's the back flushing that fixes things. I've had occasions where back flushing with bleach alone doesn't kill them. It seems to be the combination of H2O2 followed by bleach that does the trick. I once read somewhere that bleach breaks down slime, but isn't great at killing, whereas the bleach kills, but isn't great at breaking through slime.

I continue to try to think of ways to "simplify my system because if I ever pass, my poor wife is going to pay a fortune to water guys to figure this out. In the past, when they find slime in the filter, they just replace the Centaur. She will be replacing it once or twice a year.

I was wondering if anyone has ever built a "housing" around their carbon filter, and found a way to "bake" the carbon filter when needed? Maybe there is a carbon filter that incorporates a resistive heating cable through the media? If that isn't patented, it should be :) I'm not sure if the carbon tank is rated for temperature though?

I've also wondered about plumbing in a line that would allow me to back wash the carbon filter from my hot water tank. I don't think all SRB's will die at the temperature of hot water tank, but I think the serratia marcescens may. I have a lot more pink slime as compared to black, so I think that if I get rid of the pink, I may get rid of the black.

Someone invariably asks about shocking the well. I am delinquent on that. Two years since last shock. The last shock plugged the pump, and cost me $2000 to change the pump.
 

ditttohead

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We do heat sanitizing of the carbon tank by running water in the 160-180F range through it but the cost is way outside the residential range. We do this commercially only.
A few suggestions, if you have bacterial issues, switch to chlorine. H2o2 can cause problems since the h2o2 reverts to oxygen... Using H2o2 for bacterial control typically takes very high dosing.
As to sanitizing carbon with bleach, not gonna happen. You will not get bleach through th carbon bed, the carbon reduces and oxidizes the chlorine to chloride almost instantly. You need to keep bacteria from getting there in the first place.
 

Bannerman

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We do heat sanitizing of the carbon tank by running water in the 160-180F range through
For clarification incase anyone proceeds to try it, can this be performed with a regular fiberglass media tank, or does it require a SS tank?

Welcome back!
 

ditttohead

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Thanks, I have been travelling extensively as the business grows. Not too much time for forum work. Plus the new house... I installed a whole house RO, amazing! I can finally keep my pool water under control. Vynilester tanks can handle up to 150F, SS tanks can go higher.
pool.jpg
 

Beets

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Are there temperature limits on the control heads? It isn't too hard to plumb things so I can do a hot water back flush.

I have successfully cleaned my carbon filter on a number of occasions by back-washing with H2O2 and chlorine. Maybe clean is the wrong word. I've eliminated smell from the filter. Centaur Carbon is now 6 years old, and it's probably been fouled like this at least 6 to 12 times. In short, this wasn't a one-off fluke.

NaClO is not a great bactericide in my situation because my water pH is 8.5. It is also not great at removing H2S in high pH waters. I've likely had NaClO system for +10 years, so I gave it an honest try. I started with NaClO, switched to aeration, switched back to NaClO, switched to H2O2, switched to NaClO, switched to H2O2. All worked to get rid of the H2S, but they all have upsets.

I think slime has been the nemesis of all systems. I did some bottle testing of the slime, and I need 24h at 200 ppm of chlorine to kill it (I'm calling a kill when the color changes from ping/black to white). The H2O2 didn't touch it and in fact I think the slime was very happy to have H2O2 in the system. During normal ops, I'm not running with that much chlorine, so I don't know if I can expect it to control the bacteria? One of the other reasons I don't do shocks is my belief I need to let things soak for 24h to get a kill. It's hard to shut off the water for that long!

NaClO never yielded as nice as water as the H2O2. There was always a bit of a smell. I wouldn't call it H2S, but maybe slight sulphur/chemical smell. There was definitely more H2S slippage with NaClO than H2O2 and it feels like there was more upsets (if that is possible).
 

ditttohead

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There are heads designed for high water temperatures. The 2750 would be your best choice. Mix that with a vinyl Esther tank, you might do ok,
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Beets

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Thank you. The next time I find some slime, I'm going to put it in a bottle and fill the bottle with hot water from my hot water tank to see if it results in a kill.

Just did a bit of googling. It looks like I need the "HW" version which I suspect stands for hot water.
 
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