wall/ceiling bathroom vent

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by Blank, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. Blank

    Blank New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    I would like to add a bathroom vent to my small, roughly 5x8 upstairs bathroom. Does anyone have an opinion for a configuration? Most of the bathroom vents that I see at Lowe's, Home Depot, etc are ceiling mounted with vent pipe going up (into the attic) and then out the wall. Would it be better to go directly through the wall? I also need a light, but I am not sure if the lights that come with the lighted vents will be bright enough, or if I should use a separate light and vent. I suppose I could go with a wall mounted vent and a wall mounted light...... What examples I have seen seem to work, so I suppose that nearly any configuration would suffice, but I was wondering if anyone knew if one way (through the ceiling) or the other (through the wall) was better for venting. Thanks.
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    The shorter path is more efficent from an exhaust viewpoint, but the quality of the damper can let more heat out in the winter. Since the heat rises, the ceiling has benefits even with the longer ducts. So, it sort of depends on the situation and available access.

    Most of the overhead ceiling mount fan/light combos are not location properly to light up the vanity area, and are better for general lighting, not task specific lighting needed to do things like shaving or putting on makeup. There, dedicated light(s) for that are useful. If you go with ceiling, don't vent into the attic...run it to the outside, either through the roof, gable end, or (last choice) sofit area.
  3. what climate? Is noise a big concern for you? Is a specific thing making you put a vent in (toilet smell or shower vapor), or is it because you want a general improvement?

    climate is important. Is it mostly hot outside or cold? Humid or dry? Four distinct seasons?

    david
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots Sprinkler Guy

    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    Metro NYC
    One thing to argue against the shortest vent path is cold outside air - better then to run the vent line downward a ways, so that the tendency for warm air to rise will help keep outdoor air from getting indoors.
  5. nursedoe

    nursedoe New Member

    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    California High Desert
    I am going to put a vent in my tiny bathroom as well. I had thought of the ceiling light/fan combo b/c of space limitations. I have pretty lights over the mirror, so the brightness wouldn't matter too much.

    I am curious too about the climate questions. Lowe's and Home Depot's displays don't mention anything about climate. I happen to live in area of extremes. The high desert has scorching summers and freezing winters.

    My plan was to run the duct out the side of the house. I never thought about cold air coming back in. Drat!
  6. Furd

    Furd Engineer

    Messages:
    446
    Location:
    Wet side of Washington State
    Use a wall (or roof) jack with a damper along with the exhaust fan also having a damper. Use insulated ductwork in the attic.
  7. Blank

    Blank New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Thanks everyone for your help! At least now I have an understanding of what I have to deal with. I live in the Philadelphia region, so our weather is not that extreme, but now I know why the ceiling mounted fans are so popular. I won't be doing the work myself, but now I can justify my decisions. Thanks!
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