Terrible solution in my basement for washer. Recommendations?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Erick Smith, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    Hi all! Nice forum!.

    I have a basement washer and dryer. The basement only has a 2" wasteline (1965 build) so I had a plumber in to find a workable solution because the previous homeowners simply put the washer drain into the sump well. Obviously not code or good for the environment....

    So the plumber put in a lift station and approximately 7 ft of pvc for length and tied into the 2". Problem is that the lift station is too strong and causes the water to back up into my lower level sink and over flow.

    Here's a picture I took. I did a little bit of diagramming too to describe things.

    [​IMG]

    If you notice in the picture, the lift station goes up, then turns towards the camera, loops down then to the waste line.

    Any ideas what I can do?
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,124
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Here, the inspectors like to see a 4/10 hp pump dumping into a 4" line.
    3" could maybe work, but a 2" is going to have issues. Once you go from pumped to gravity, things start to slow down.

    Is there a way to intercept a larger line outside the foundation? Normnally you would find a 4" at some point. Or at least bring the pumped 2" to that 4" line.
  3. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    No, the main line it on the other side, opposite of the bathroom on the other side of this wall.
  4. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    The pump needs to connect to the building drain, which is 3" or 4". Depending on the plumbing layout and accessibly, sometimes it is easier to make the connection on the outside of the foundation.

    The right way is not likely to be the easy way.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,825
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    You could also have a partially clogged drain line if the backup is that severe. But, since it appears that they used a 2" ejector pump, rather than the more common, and appropriate, 1 1/4" sump pump, that could also be the problem since it has a very powerful discharge capacity.
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  6. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    So it could be as simple as a 1 1/4" lift rather than this beast? As well as ensuring a clean line? I had used some of that drain chemical stuff that sits in there and slowly eats away but Im guessing it only works on big stuff.

    Thanks!
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,124
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Like hj mentions, you're only pumping a washer. Using a smaller pump would help.
  8. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    Those smaller ones easy to find? Im afraid the previous plumber only had access to this monster locally.
  9. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    Im actually wondering if I even need the pump. The reason we did all this was because of the slight washup to the sink. Wondering if it's just clogged and a good cleanout would resolve all of this because a washer pump isnt nearly as strong as this pump.
  10. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    The plumbing code requires a washing machine to be drained into a laundry tray or a standpipe. It would violate the code to install a properly trapped and vented standpipe high enough to drain into that cast iron line.
  11. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,825
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; I had used some of that drain chemical stuff that sits in there and slowly eats away but Im guessing it only works on big stuff.

    In my opinion, it doesn't work for ANY stuff. Believe me, a 1 1/4" pump is a LOT easier to find than that beast, but he made a much bigger profit by using it. The washer COULD pump up to a "P" trap properly installed into the drain line, BUT, it would overflow and flood the basement any time the drain got partially clogged.
  12. Erick Smith

    Erick Smith New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Ohio
    It had worked in my case because my upstairs kitchen drain was backing up to this same lower level sink im having issues with now and when i poured that crap down the kitchen drain, the lower level sink eventually gurgled a few times then it finally drained. But I guess I could have a trustworthy plumber look at this and I take the knowledge I've obtained here to have them give me proper service.

    Wish I found this place a few years ago. GIANT wealth of knowledge here. Thanks
  13. throttle it down and see if that dont work

    that is a pretty expensive sewage pump that the plumber installed
    a simple solution to the problem might be just to clean out the drain

    then install a 2 inch ball valve in out going line above the check valve...
    then basically throttle down the ball valve to about 1/4 of the way open to
    slow down the flow///

    a ball valve is pretty cheap and easy to install and I I am wrong
    you have not spent a fortune on the experiement

    check out my new web site is the girl hot or not??

    http://plumberindianapolis.com/




  14. Rich B

    Rich B DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    283
    Location:
    New Jersey

    How high is to high for a washer standpipe?
    I have 2 in my basements and since the 4" waste line exits the foundation wall at about 3 feet the standpipe tops are about 5 feet off the floor. They are 2" and vented and work fine.....

    I have wanted to add slop sink and could easily dump the washer into the sink with a pump and pump the water up and out.....but then the next issue is connecting that pump to the waste line and removing the standpipes.....
  15. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Here the standpipe must extend from 18"-36" higher than the weir of the trap, and the top cannot be more than 48" above the floor.

    I like the Liberty sink pumps. The 404 is great for a slop sink. I would like to try the the 405 direct-connected to a standpipe in the future.
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
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