Proprietary Faucet Supplies - Can I Solder in Copper Tubes?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by mattbeme, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    I have noticed that many companies are using proprietary flexible supply lines on faucets.

    1. Would it be possible to solder in good ol fashioned soft copper tubing stubs into the holes that the flex lines plug into?

    2. I was thinking that if needed the holes could be drilled out a minimal depth with a bit with a diameter just big enough to push a copper tube into and then solder it in.

    Sound do-able?

    Matt B
  2. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    Bad, bad idea. Especially if you have to drill out a fitting to accomplish this. Just stick to tried and true compression fittings.
  3. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    I should have been more specific.

    I am talking about the main faucet/valve body into which the proprietary flexible lines plug into. The other end of these lines then screw onto the water supply shut-off valves.

    The holes that these lines plug into are the ones I was wondering about soldering copper tubing into. Just like the way faucets used to be.


    Matt B

    --Notice the 2 braided lines with the long, narrow fittings at one end. These fittings go into the bottom of the 'valve body' of the faucet. Notice there are no copper tubing stubs with threaded adapters sticking out from under the faucet valve body - like faucets used to be made.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2009
  4. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Can you tell us a model and brand of a faucet you are talking about. I never seen what you are speaking of.
  5. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    The only thing needed might be some plumbers grease on the o-rings. They should engage when pushed firmly in.
  6. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    O Rings disintegrate quite rapidly with highly chlorinated water I believe.

    The old system of having soldered-in tubing stubs was very strong and very reliable.

    I need a new kitchen faucet with pull-out spray and I am not thrilled with seeing this new supply hose system on so many faucets.

    Matt B
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,416
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Just use the parts they send you.
    Many faucet companies have been using o-rings for years.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 26, 2009
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,247
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    connections

    If "O" rings deteriorated rapidly from contact with water, MILLIONS of pipe connections are in trouble. They wear out from movement and those connections do not move once they are installed. You could create many more problems by drilling them out and soldering copper into them, than you would ever prevent by using the supplied fittings.
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 26, 2009
  9. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    O Rings: some are in contact with water more than others and in different manners.

    The rubber lined supply hoses on my water tank are rapidly disintegrating due to the highly chlorinated water (esp. a problem with chlorproamine)

    Why is it that many rubber seals, o rings etc. seem to turn to an almost mushy goo within several years?

    Matt B.
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,247
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    O rings

    I could not tell you because I have not seen it happen.
  11. Reader Review

    Reader Review Comments by readers

    Matt,
    You may as well just solder that puppy up.

    We would love to see how that goes.
    Please post pictures when you are done.

    You still haven't convinced any plumbers that work with these every day though. Maybe it's just that we are so busy installing these things, and the fact that we have never been called back for a repair on them, that we just don't know enough about them.
    So let's start with your faucet, and start experimenting with it.
    Maybe there is a better way then what the German engineers have come up with.
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,247
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    supplies

    ALL we have to know about them is that if we use them the way they were supplied, they go together easily, and if we do not have future problems with them, there is no reason to go to the trouble of drilling them out and then soldering them together. IF we had to do that, we would IMMEDIATELY stop using that brand of faucet.
  13. kingsotall

    kingsotall Plunger/TurdPuncher

    Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice... yada yada yada
  14. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    thanks guys. You've convinced me that I can trust these supply line systems.

    I understand the frustration with what I was proposing but I have to say that more and more all the time my work in electronics and furniture and auto repair involves machining, adding braces, fixing cracks, re-welding, etc. etc. Why? because companies are altering the construction of so many products in an effort to increase their profit. Of course they like to call it the "new, improved design which will make the product better, safer and will help the environment". I don't accept any changes in design without great suspicion. You wouldn't believe how many expensive products I've had to fix because some minor part was cheapened yet $10 worth of hardware was all it often took to make them as strong and durable as things USED TO BE.
    Failures are often not even noticed if they're hidden from view. Slow leaks from plumbing in out of sight places like dark, untidy cabinets can go unnoticed a long time.

    Matt
  15. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    Soldering the lines would void the Warranty...
  16. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,247
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    ?

    quote; You wouldn't believe how many expensive products I've had to fix because some minor part was cheapened yet $10 worth of hardware was all it often took to make them as strong and durable as things USED TO BE.

    $10.00? That would be a fortune if the item has a large production run. Manufacturers modify the product if they can do it for ten cents less per item.
  17. mattbeme

    mattbeme New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Canada
    $10 worth of hardware ..... that's $10 for the customer or myself! .... probably 25 cents for the manufacturer if they were to put the proper part on.


    Matt
Similar Threads: Proprietary Faucet
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Proprietary Faucet Supply Lines - Are They Good? Mar 17, 2009
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice hole size for typical single hole faucet? Today at 12:56 AM
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Problem with faucet install Yesterday at 9:42 AM
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Cucina faucet leaking Monday at 7:24 AM
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Faucet extenders Saturday at 11:25 AM

Share This Page