1. johnson1451

    johnson1451 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    trying to make repair on 1 1/4 x 1 1/4 x x 3/4 tee fitting 1" joint leaking on fitting, drained down system but still have small amount of water in pipes. anyway to resolder this joint without cutting into pipes and installing valve to stop flow of water?
  2. GabeS

    GabeS Remodel Contractor

    Messages:
    294
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    white part of wonderbread should buy you enough time to solder the joint. It would then dissolve in the system when the water is turned back on.

    What's the 1" joint?

    Best to read some of the threads on soldering copper pipe first. You'd be surprised of the do's and don'ts.
  3. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    Jet Swet.....

    Attached Files:

  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,041
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    You will have to cut a pipe, and drain the water.
    Heat and pull off the fitting.
    Clean and flux
    Assemble
    Solder

    There is no short cut here.
  5. GabeS

    GabeS Remodel Contractor

    Messages:
    294
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    Terry,

    I think he said that the valve wasn't closing all the way and he still had some water flowing that was preventing the pipe from heating up enough for the solder to melt. What would you do in this situation?
  6. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,041
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    There is no mention of a valve in his post, only that he can't drain down the water enough to heat the fitting.

    As plumbers, we see this all the time.
    And the first time we see it as young pups, we try to heat it anyway.

    When we find that doesn't work, we spend the rest of our life cutting the pipe and pulling the fitting off so we can clean, flux and solder it.

    If you need to drain a house down quickly, open "all" of the faucets in the home. If you don't, it will take hours longer.

    There is no short cut for the fitting.
    Once it has had water in it, and it has leaked, it needs to be pulled.
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2008
  7. gardner

    gardner DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    217
    Location:
    Ontario
    I have had a little success in helping a branch drain faster by blowing air into it from one of the fittings.
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,680
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    joint

    There is usually some way to stop the flow of water, either by intercepting it before it gets to the joint, or shutting off the entire building. But you will not be able to just "resolder" the joint. Once water has leaked through it is is contaminated and you have to take it apart and redo it as a new joint. Which means you will probably have to cut it apart anyway.
  9. johnson1451

    johnson1451 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    thanks

    1" was typo meant the 3/4 was where leak is at. thanks for posts looks like going tohave to drain down building unfortunately no shut offs anywhere to isolate the T fitting.
    What contaminates joint once it leaks minerals in water?
  10. Basement_Lurker

    Basement_Lurker One who lurks

    Messages:
    668
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    As everyone is telling you, you can't just reheat the fitting and jam more solder into there. You need to cut out that fitting and as much tubing as necessary to get the joint installed and soldered properly.

    As GabeS said, if you are having problems with residual water in the lines leaking out into the joint that you are trying to work on after you have shut off and drained the system, you can use some white bread (not the crusts, and certainly do not use brown bread) to create a blockage in the tubing to hold back the water temporarily. The bread will break up once you pressurize the system...just be sure to leave the aerator off of whatever fixture that line leads to so that you can flush out the bread particles.

    Or, better yet, if you have access to a wet vac, you can cut into your pipe, and put the vac over the line for a few minutes and suck the residual water in it out.
  11. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,680
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    joint

    The water itself does the contamination. Once the flux is washed, or burned, off the solder has to make contact quickly, otherwise the copper starts to oxidize and has to be recleaned and refluxed.
  12. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,041
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    And when you are soldering, you can't isolate it completely.

    There has to be an open end for the expanding air to escape.
    If you don't provide that, then it will find a way on the last joint you solder, blowing out the solder and causing a leak.

    You have to have something open, like a faucet.

    But since you have opened up all the faucets to speed the drain down, just leave them open until you are done soldering the last joint.
Similar Threads: pipe repair
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & No flow to faucet after pipe repair Jun 7, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & repairing leak on older/smaller copper pipe advice wanted Apr 22, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Frozen Pipe Repair Dec 10, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Repairing/replacing leaky copper DWV pipe Sep 9, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Copper Pipe repair for a newbie Jun 14, 2013

Share This Page