How would you plumb this drain in this setup?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by pghsebring, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. pghsebring

    pghsebring DIY Member

    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Ohio
    I need to run a 2" drain where the blue line is in that picture. It goes up the basement wall, into the kitchen for the kitchen sink. First, you have to realize they put the joists 16" OC, starting from the wall that would be to the right in the picture, and it just so happened that the last joist before the rim joist fell exactly where it was pretty much "touching corners" with the sill plate. Amazing, huh? So there is a space i cannot get to...

    All measurements are exact, 9" means 9". I have some weird lumber... Except the 2x4 stud wall is 1.5" x 3.5" i believe. Everything else is exact.

    The problem i see is that if i put a 2" drain in the 2x4 stud wall, i'd have to cut out part of the rim joist to get it to fit back behind the wall, then make a turn in an area i can't reach...

    So, how would you do it? The sink has to go there...i can't build out the wall to 2x6 either...

    [​IMG]
  2. Bobtom

    Bobtom New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    In the blue state of Indiana.
    Not being a plumber I do not know if this idea is of any value. But if there is a cabinet located where the word "inside" is, why not just run the pipe straight down through the floor between the two joists to the right of the rim joist? Or else come down in the wall cavity to just above the sole plate and 45 out of the cavity into back into the cavity and then 45 straight back down through the subfloor between those two joists to the right of the rim joist. Of course, if there is no cabinet to hide this piping or if you desire a neat interior space in your cabinets, this will not work for you. If you are a wood butcher like myself, you could always cut out whatever is in the way (sole plate, floor, part of the rim joist, part of the other joist) and reinforce whatever is cut out.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,258
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    drain

    You are going to have a "flat" section anyway, so go up through the floor and put the flat section under the cabinet. And what are you going to do for a vent? I hope you are not going to ask, "What's a vent?"
  4. pghsebring

    pghsebring DIY Member

    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Ohio
    That's what i was concerned about - if i put it in the wall, venting is easy. If i come up through the floor (yes, its in a cabinet) then how do you vent it?

    What do you mean "flat section"? I'm not following your path. Could you describe like "45 through joist, 90 in space, 45 just before rim joist, 90 under cabinet, etc" so i can understand the path you think i should take? Thanks again.
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Cabinets have 3.5" of space underneath.
    You can go up through the floor, turn toward the wall and into the wall using the proper fittings, Then continue up through the roof for the vent.

    It's okay to use that open space under the cabinet for the pipes.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,258
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    offset

    Just extend the vertical pipe through the floor and then use the two 90's and offset into the wall. That might not be how I would do it, but is easier for a DIY'er.
  7. pghsebring

    pghsebring DIY Member

    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Ohio
    Thanks, makes sense.

    Well, how would you do it yourself?
  8. pghsebring

    pghsebring DIY Member

    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Ohio
    Alright, well, instead of the easy way with 2 90's (i decided i didn't want them under the cabinet and i also decided there was more of a chance of a clog), i went the hard route.

    Inside the wall, I put, from the top down, 22.5, straight pipe, 22.5, 45 that comes out of the wall, straight pipe, 45 to make it face downward, then 2 more 45's to offset it closer to the wall.

    I'm short a 45, thats why its not completely plumbed. The 45 to offset it to the wall and the long drop are the two pieces missing in the pictures. Everything else is pretty well finished...any obvious errors?

    The one picture under the laundry tub, the place the AAV is going is covered in blue tape. The notch i put in the joist is less than 1/6 tall and 1/3 wide...altough i need to reinforce the joist with a steel plate of some sort due to the previous owners notch...

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    Obviously, the electric, drywalling, painting, and trap for sink need finished...
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,258
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    drain

    I am not positive, because I am not there to see the actual situation, but usually I would either drill through on a 45 degree angle either at the top or bottom of the joist to avoid that horizontal double elbow section. That portion is going to be a "pain" if the drain has to be snaked someday.
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