Electrical PVC for potable water?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by ronquick, Mar 28, 2009.

  1. ronquick

    ronquick New Member

    Messages:
    4
    I am running 1/2 "water lines to a bathroom in the barn, I ran an additional 1" schedule 40 pvc for a later use spare. I want to use electical sweeps at each end so it can use it for water or wire depending on the need. Is there any health issues if it is used for drinking water?
  2. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    You can not use electrical PVC for water.You can not use SCH 40 for potable
    water.
  3. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I would not say you can not use SCH 40 for potable water, there are many states that allow it for cold water supply only. Illinois is one of them. Now electrical PVC pipe and fittings are not rated for plumbing use.
  4. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,360
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    You can use PVC underground for potable water, it is only permitted above ground in some states. There is really nothing to be gained by using long sweeps in a water supply, only in drains where crud is passing through and could clog on a tight turn.
  5. Waterwelldude

    Waterwelldude Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer

    Messages:
    303
    Location:
    Texas

    Can you say "why " it is not for plumbing use.
    I just left a job where the guy had ran some electrical pipe sch 40, for some of his water line.

    If there is a reason it should not be there, I would like to let him know why he should remove it.

    Thanks.

    Travis



    PS, No, it has nothing to do with cleaner or primer. lol
  6. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    The grey ELECTRICAL conduit is for wiring,ASTM rates materials for specific
    applications.
  7. chris8796

    chris8796 New Member

    Messages:
    100
    Location:
    Illinois
    For elec conduit, the pressure rating is a problem and flexible PVC has plasticizers that give it flexibility. These leach out and can give water a plastic taste, supposedily non-toxic. Doesn't seem worth it to save a few bucks.
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2009
  8. ronquick

    ronquick New Member

    Messages:
    4
    This is being used for a bathroom and shower in the barn, Any idea why it is not to be used for hot water? I already have it burried so I I will be using for both. It will be connected in my basement so I would prefer the connection dont come apart.
    Thanks for all your input!
  9. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    PVC is not rated for hot water , CPVC is rated for use with hot water. Standard PVC becomes pliable and will lose its shape when hot water is used in it.
  10. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,154
    Location:
    New England
    First, PVC is not rated for hot water supply, as far as I know, ever. Then, 1/2" on a long supply will have LOTS of friction, and your flow and pressure will suffer. CPVC is allowed for hot. Both can get brittle as they age. You'd be much better served on a long run to run a bigger pipe, and, chose one with no underground connections.. The pipes designed for this are much more resilient, and if you lay it sort of from side to side of the trench, you won't risk damaging the pipe from expansion and contraction issues...your idea just isn't very good, and won't pass inspection, either.
  11. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    To be approved to be used for water service use it must meet these standards for the PVC pipe ASTM D 1785-1996b, ASTM D 2241-1996b, ASTM D 2672-1996a, CSA B137.3-1999 in B137

    and the joints must meet these standards to be approved for water service use needs to meet these standards. ASTM D 2855-1996, CSA B137.2-1999 in B137


    Now to meet the standards for water distribution pipe ASTM D 1785-1996b,
    ASTM D 2241-1996b, ASTM D 2672-1996a, CSA B137.3-1999 in B137

    water distribution joints ASTM D 2855-1996, CSA B137.2-1999 in B137, CSA B137.3-1999 in B137
    and there is a note for using PVC for water distribution 3 Use for cold or tempered water only.





    .
  12. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Everything used/comes in contact with the water, in a potable water system must be approved to meet NSF Standard 61, or it is not permitted/allowed or used. That is federal law and followed by a states.

    Sch 40 PVC is NSF standard 61 and is allowed in most areas under and above ground but codes disallow it inside a house. It is not approved for hot water use because its pressure rating is done at 73*f. For every x degree increase in temp you lose X psi.

    Ronquick, you were correct in questioning your choice, so replace the 1/2" PVC which is probably too small due to friction loss for the distance, or use regular 1/2" sch 40 PVC elbows on it. Half inch sch 40 pvc is about equivalent to 3/4" CPVC or 3/4" copper because it is IPS (iron pipe size which maintains the ID, copper etc. is CTS (copper tubing size) and that maintains the OD, so the ID is smaller than IPS pipe.

    Tell your buddy not to pressurize his. The best choice is a roll of 1" PE (polyethylene) pipe with one fitting on each end. I'd use 160 psi rated.
  13. ronquick

    ronquick New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Thanks to everone for the info, I have decided to use the 1" schedule 40 with schedule 40 elbows for the cold water feed line and install a small hot water heater in the barn. I have ran 1/2 copper for the bathroom fixtures.
  14. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    IIRC the only plastic you can run to a water heater is CPVC and PEX.
  15. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
  16. 99k

    99k Radon Contractor and Water Treatment

    Messages:
    460
    Location:
    Fairfield Co.,Connecticut
    PVC has materials added to it to facilitate the manufacturing process. Grey electrical PVC has toxic heavy metals added to it, I believe I was told it was Lead , by a major manufacturer of pipe. DO NOT RUN POTABLE WATER THROUGH THIS PIPE.
Similar Threads: Electrical potable
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Looking for a bi-directional electrically actuated valve Nov 15, 2011
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice two zone circulator electrical connections taco to becket afg Nov 9, 2010
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Bit of an electrical Gremlin on an older boiler system. Aug 3, 2010
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice electrical? on a water heater Jul 26, 2010
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Is there a plumbing equivalent to Richter's "Practical Electrical Wiring" book? May 5, 2010

Share This Page