Wiring Bathroom Fan

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by jsarin1, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. jsarin1

    jsarin1 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Can someone explain how to wire a bathroom fan using the wiring from a standard outlet? Attached is a photo of the outlet's wiring.

    IMG_5444.JPG

    I believe the clump of white wires together is neutral and the black is hot. There are also a blue, red, and another white that connect in the box that I believe are for rooms above this 1/2 bath.

    I plan on running the wiring behind a chair rail molding around the room to its own switch.
    I thought of wiring it straight to an overhead light in this room, but I rather have it work with its own switch and not turn on with the light...

    The fan is a simple duct-less Broan that has a black and a white wire. No light, warmer, etc.

    Any advice is appreciated.
  2. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    You're in way over your head.

    You CANNOT run the wiring inside the chair rail, where have you ever seen that done before?

    What good is a fan that has no duct to exhaust the warm moist air outside?
  3. jsarin1

    jsarin1 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Looks like according to code, I need to use metal conduit to run the wiring. I can install the conduit behind a crown molding as long as it has 1 1/2 in. from surface of the molding. I'll be doing this instead.

    Can you help with the wiring part of this?
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,129
    Location:
    New England
    Are you tearing out that box and making it a double to include a new switch? Or what?

    Basically, run a 12/2 wire up there (12g, if this is on a 20A circuit is required), connect black to black, white to white, and ground to ground at the fan. Then, in the box, add the white to the bundle. Use a short pigtail from the black feeding the receptacle to one side of the new switch, and the black from the new wire you ran to the other terminal of the switch, and tie all of the ground together...essentially, you switch the hot lead, and run the neutral directly there.
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    20/2??????? That is not even a lamp wire, not for a fan circuit, and definitely NOT for a 20amp circuit!!!!!!!!
  6. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    Jim meant 12/2, not 20/2.
  7. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    That existing box the GFCI receptacle is in is too small. Do not add wires to it until you replace it with the correct size box. You have no bare or green wire for ground. Hopefully the metal electric pipes are your ground, but I don't trust them. So, it would be much safer to take power from the load side of the GFCI. Metal conduit is not required by the National Code, is it a local code?
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  8. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    You're an electrician that doesn't trust bonding of metal components? Really?
  9. jsarin1

    jsarin1 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Location:
    Naperville, IL
    Jim,

    Thanks for the reply. That setup works perfectly, just what I needed.
    Also it looks like I'm scrapping the crown molding idea and boring my studs instead.

    Thanks again all.
  10. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    I don't trust old houses with obvious code violations (box fill) and who knows how much hack work upstream. I might trust my multitester, if I were there to test the ground.:rolleyes:
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  11. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    Ok, I count 13 existing #12 wires. With two devices, an additional 12-2 w/g and one internal romex clamp, that needs 45 cubic inches of volume. Please, buy your new double gang box with at least 45 cubic inches stamped on it. And the GFCI tweak would be ... The short black wire from the switch goes to the hot screw, load side of the receptacle. Not pigtailed to the black feeding the receptacle. The white from the new 12-2w/g goes to the white/neutral screw of the load side of the receptacle. Not the bundle. The bare wire in the 12-2w/g goes under a green screw in the new metal box. Good luck.:)
  12. ActionDave

    ActionDave Electrician

    Messages:
    351
    Location:
    Colorado
    The work is done using conduit. There is not any romex or romex clamps to be found in the photo.

    I can't tell how many wires are in that box. It doesn't look like thirteen to me.
  13. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    In post #9, jsarin1 decided how to do the future work. My post is about that new work. Not the picture. Jsarin1 can count the wires, and let me know if I'm way off.
  14. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

    Messages:
    2,540
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Clamp or no clamp the box is overfilled as it now stands and no other conductor should be added.
Similar Threads: Wiring Bathroom
Forum Title Date
Electrical Forum discussion & Blog wiring my bathroom Oct 2, 2014
Electrical Forum discussion & Blog Need Help Wiring Relay for Bathroom Timers Aug 13, 2013
Electrical Forum discussion & Blog new bathroom wiring project Mar 15, 2013
Electrical Forum discussion & Blog Bathroom Remodel Wiring Question May 28, 2012
Electrical Forum discussion & Blog Bathroom GFI Receptacle and Light Wiring May 1, 2012

Share This Page