well water treatment? Please help.

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by Daisy, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. Daisy

    Daisy New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    Southwest Washington state
    When I installed my new pump and pressure tank I noticed that the old pump was totally clogged with bacterial iron. I put some bleach into the well and it cleared up for about 10 days. I also have a septic tank. My question is-- Is there anything that can treat the water in the well that is safe for a septic tank?
  2. sammyhydro11

    sammyhydro11 Previous member

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    The first step is get a full chemical analysis of the water.Usualy to properly treat iron bacteria you need a chemical feed chlorinator,carbon backwash filter,and a water softener. The size of the unit will be determined by your analysis.

    SAM
  3. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Where and how is the best place or way to do that? A nearby water-softener salesman seems pretty sharp, but is he likely to have the necessary resources?
  4. Raucina

    Raucina Previous member

    Messages:
    515
    Rather than deal with filters, I periodically super chlorinate my iron infested well and make sure all portions of the piping sit filled with the solution for several hours. I also make sure water is being pumped back into the well so that areas above water line are also treated. You can usually find an unused hole in the well cap - or make one, or raise it a few inches if plumbing permits.

    You have to go the whole route to get a lasting cure-a gallon down the hole is not going to help.

    Septic tanks take some chlorine without any problems, the bacterial load is so high that its almost impossible to disturb it. Dont waste any money on the
    useless septic "pumper-plumber in a bottle" snake oil either.
  5. sammyhydro11

    sammyhydro11 Previous member

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    I would get it tested by a local certified lab and not by a salesman.You need to take the analysis before any water filters or treatment system. The periodic well chlorination can work to kill the iron bacteria but wont get rid of the iron. Most people don't want to have to pour bleach down there well every so often and want something that is going to work automatically.

    SAM
  6. Daisy

    Daisy New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    Southwest Washington state
    Thanks for all your replies, however------

    Since I have a limited budget, what should all of this cost? including test, and the necessary equipment. My well is 90' deep with one person using it. Right now I have bottled drinking water delivered since the well water makes me sick.
  7. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Mine is 65' deep, and I will let you know what I end up doing and what is cost.
  8. sammyhydro11

    sammyhydro11 Previous member

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Here in New England the water analysis is around 75.00. The equipment that you need will be based on the water analysis.

    SAM
  9. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    The short answer is yes, a chlorine pellet dropper can be installed on the well. The down side in chlorinating a well can cause problems with the pump, cable and drop pipe and cause water quality problems. That applies to shocking a well or constant chlorination.

    Any water treatment dealer, pump guy, well driller, lab, pump or plumbing supply houses or the county folks can test water. There is no need for any of them to lie to you about what and how much of it is in your water, you already know the water has problems.

    What you need to know is all the choices you have in what type of equipment will successfully treat the problem. To treat any type of reducing bacteria, like IRB, you need a disinfectant. They are chlorine, three types of equipment are used for chlorine, or hydrogen peroxide although it doesn't work very well for that type of bacteria problems and requires a solution feeder, or ozone which is generated on site and very expensive.

    All those types of treatment require a proper retention and a turbidity filter. How you introduce the disinfectant varies; solution feeders require a lot of baby sitting, well casing mounted droppers stand on top the well about 3' high, inline erosion pellet chlorinators install in your plumbing past the pressure tank and are my choice because they are compact, take up no floor space, are inexpensive, have no moving parts and don't need electric and you don't have to mix any solutions or have an ozone generator or air dryer and their expense.

    If you shock a well for IRB or other bacteria, that is at best a temporary 'fix' because the bacteria re-enters the well with the recovery water and recontaminates the well and pump etc..

    All systems above can use a special carbon filter to remove the chlorine etc. from the water so you do not have the smell or taste of it in the water and thereby the septic system is not bothered by the disinfectant.
  10. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    So then, and with the matter of cost aside for the moment, ozone would be the only way to keep the water in my well free of bacteria without doing any damage to any of the mechanical components of the well?
  11. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Here is something I just found:

    www.berrysystemsinc.com/products/halovac.html

    Overall, this company claims its system will eliminate/control bacteria within a well as well as to eliminate/reduce slime and scale buildup. If this system does not have any drawbacks similar to those of chlorine injectors, maybe this is the solution here ...
  12. MaxBlack

    MaxBlack Member

    Messages:
    67
    Location:
    TX Hill Country
    Gary I tried an inline chlorinator (not yours) and after only a few months the internal feeder (suction?) line clogged. I took it apart and the gunk in the line was rock-solid; dunno if from the clorine pellet residue or from hard water. Anyway maybe I was using pellets that were too soft? Pro Chlor-Pel. BTW I couldn't find on your website that you sell your pellets separately online?
  13. MaxBlack

    MaxBlack Member

    Messages:
    67
    Location:
    TX Hill Country
    I couldn't find any pricing on their site--I would be particularly interested in their HaloSan product which they say MUST be used with the HaloVac. It might be VERY pricey for an on-going expense.

    I wonder too how their ScreenCleanPlus might differ from the Super IronOut we get at Wal-mart.
  14. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    Uses "Nonyl phenoxy polyoxyethylene ethanol-iodine complex ".

    Wow... I would assume it is simular to a chlorine injector, except using an iodine disolved in an alchol product.

    By the way it's also used as a teat dip... if you care.

    Rancher
  15. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    I suspect they might not sell to a mere end-user consumer. I read something on their website about "must be installed by ...", and maybe they even sell their chemicals only to/though licensed plumbers also. There is a certain drain cleaner I have used that can only come from/through a licensed plumber-dealer, but I did once find the same thing in an identical can with a different label.

    What does "Super IronOut" do? It would be easy to add a solenoid valve and do some treated re-circulating back into the well whenever the pump runs.
  16. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Well, clean teats could be nice, I suppose, but I happen to be allergic to iodine as well as to alcohol.

    I sent the company an e-mail request for some information since I was not able to open their brochures available on their website, but they have yet to respond. Before going too far here, however, I would have to know what kind of treatment my water might need following theirs.
  17. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I said: What you need to know is all the choices you have in what type of equipment will successfully treat the problem. To treat any type of reducing bacteria, like IRB, you need a disinfectant. They are chlorine, three types of equipment are used for chlorine, or hydrogen peroxide although it doesn't work very well for that type of bacteria problems and requires a solution feeder, or ozone which is generated on site and very expensive.

    Ozone is a disinfectant and the last I mentioned.

    Maxblack said.
    You have to clean mine and I suppose the impostrers' but, you should do it before it gets that bad or runs out of pellets. All pellets do it but some might be worse than others.

    I sell anything anyone could need, I just don't have much of it on my web site.
  18. MaxBlack

    MaxBlack Member

    Messages:
    67
    Location:
    TX Hill Country
    Thanks, I'll try to remember that! Oh, wait, you're talking about water treatment stuff... :p

    Re: cleaning the feeder--yeah everybody (including me I suppose) keeps looking for a trouble-and-maintenance-free solution to their lousy water problems, and I'm learning (too slowly, probably) that such magic does not (yet) exist! ;)
  19. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Yes, I heard that, and I am asking about any negative effects from ozone such as with chlorine. My desire and intention is to first apply whatever treatment I need outside the house to protect the mechanical components of my well -- sumbersible pump, screen, etc. -- from whatever might be there to harm it, and to then do anything additional that might be desired/required on the inside of the house in relation to ultimate water quality.

    Do you get involved with well-water testing?
  20. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,143
    Location:
    New England
    Ozone is an unstable form of oxygen. When in contact with things, it oxydizes them and this tears up organic things. One of the biggest natural sources is a thunderstorm. After reacting, it returns to a stable form of oxygen - the stuff you breath.
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