Test question for you pro's.....

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by Randyj, Jun 4, 2007.

  1. Randyj

    Randyj Master Plumber

    Messages:
    1,047
    Location:
    Alabama
    I'm doing mental gymnastics thinking about this well pump, pressure, feet of head, etc.

    If 10 gpm yields 600 gph then how many square feet of lawn will be covered with 1" of water in one hour?
  2. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    7.48 gallons per cubic foot, divide by 12 equals .623 gallons per square foot, 1 inch deep, divided into 600 is 962.5 square feet or about a 31' by 31' lawn.

    Rancher
  3. Randyj

    Randyj Master Plumber

    Messages:
    1,047
    Location:
    Alabama
    Thanks!... easy to remember...the same size as the floor space in the little house I'm building...so 10 gpm would flood my floor with 1" of water in one hour...
  4. rshackleford

    rshackleford New Member

    Messages:
    284
    Location:
    Eastern Montana (The Bakken)
    yeah, but how many acre feet would that be?
  5. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    0.00184132996632996632996632996633 acre-feet

    Rancher
  6. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

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    Riverview, Fl.
    Did you do that longhand Rancher???
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    acre feet

    A cubic foot of water is 7.48 gallon, An acre foot is 43560 square feet. Do the math.
  8. Rancher

    Rancher Guest

    I hate math, I guessed. And I figured nobody would call me on it.

    And an acre foot is 43560 square feet, one foot deep, i.e. 43560 cubic feet.

    Rancher
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 5, 2007
  9. rshackleford

    rshackleford New Member

    Messages:
    284
    Location:
    Eastern Montana (The Bakken)
    how about in miner's inches?
  10. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    A Miner's inch is not a unit of volume; it is a flow rate. It depends on where you are and has been established by law in several states.

    In Arizona, California, Montana, Nevada, and Oregon it is 11.22 GPM, but by general practice (not law) in Southern California it is 9 GPM.

    In Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Utah it is 8.98 GPM.

    In Colorado it is 11.69 GPM.

    Reference: Colt Industries Hydraulic Handbook (1971)

    From Wikipedia:
    miner's inch (′mīn·ərz ′inch)
    (mining engineering) The quantity of water that will escape from an aperture 1 inch (2.54 centimeter) square through a 2-inch-thick (5.08-centimeter) plank, with a steady flow of water standing 6 inches (15.24 centimeters) above the top of the escape aperture, the quantity so discharged amounting to 2274 cubic feet (64.39 cubic meters) in 24 hours.
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2007
  11. rshackleford

    rshackleford New Member

    Messages:
    284
    Location:
    Eastern Montana (The Bakken)
    so there are about 40 miner's inches in a cfs?
  12. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Yes; in Arizona, California, Montana, Nevada, and Oregon where a Miner's inch is 11.22 GPM.
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