Preparing durock for spray- on texture

Discussion in 'Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog' started by SH140, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. SH140

    SH140 New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Vallejo, Ca.
    The durock has been installed (rough side out) in shower to the ceiling with the original intention of tiling up to the ceiling. As an afterthought, I may not go up that far.

    My question is how to prepare the durock ABOVE the tile line before I spray texture throughout the walls & ceiling. Should I skim coat it with sheetrock mud or use thinset? Also, I assume that it's not a good idea to apply thinset & tile over sheetrock mud, is that correct?

    Oh, I almost forgot...what's best to use, to remove glue residue after removing label from durock?

    Thanks...
    __________________
    Steve
    SH140 is online now Report Post Edit/Delete Message
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,896
    Location:
    New England
    A common type of mud comes in a bucket, and that stuff will soften if it gets wet, so no, it's not a great idea to use it in an area that may get damp or wet (thinset IS mixed with water, and that could affect the bond). You can get SETTING drywall mud, and once cured, it does not soften. I don't think you really need to do anything to the Durock prior to applying texture. I'd carefully read the manufacturer's instructions first, though, to verify.
  3. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple I love these ACO Shower Drains - Best in Class

    Messages:
    3,944
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    I'd most likely flat trowel it with thin-set - something like Laticrete 254, Ardex S14, Kerabond Keralastic and let that set up overnight. Then use stucco mesh and joint compound drywall mud. The modified thinset will bite better to the backerboard and the joint compound should bit over the flat trowelled backer board.

    Rub the glue residue with the back side of a brick. It will come right off.

    JW
  4. SH140

    SH140 New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Vallejo, Ca.
    Thanks Jim, even though it will be up near the ceiling, that's kinda what I was thinking about the mud too. I will use the Hydroban all the way to ceiling, and will see if that smooths out the roughness of the durock any. If not, maybe I can skim coat with thinset to knock off the rough finish before texturing. Do you think that is possible with thinset and still get it fairly smooth? I don't want to apply the texturing real thick, only enough to get the effect. Maybe the Hydroban should go on after the skim coat, but before the texture??
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,896
    Location:
    New England
    You have to consider the color and how much texturing you're going to put on plus if it's going to get a coat of paint or not. But, texture should adhere. Now, trying to get things flat to start out is possible, but harder. A plasterer makes it look easy, but it's not! Thinset isn't designed as a finish coat and can be moderately grainy texture, depending on which one you use. A setting drywall compound might work, but not one from a bucket. WOrking time is short and sanding, if it comes to that, is much harder, but possible. Personally, I've not had good luck with texturing - your results may differ. The people that do it every day can get a nice even (or random, if that's what you want) look...me, it looks patched.
  6. SH140

    SH140 New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Vallejo, Ca.
    The method of texturing (if I'm using the correct term) is with what looks similar to a compressor driven paint gun with a hopper on top that holds the mud and spits it onto the wall, ceiling, etc. After that a coat or two of enamel paint.
    As far as if this would be a "dry" area? It would be 6 1/2 to 7 feet from the floor, so I guess it would be relatively dry, just a little splashing maybe.

    I'll be using Hydroban on the walls, I assume that I'd want to apply that directly to durock before anything else?

    My plan is to apply Hydroban (from tub to ceiling) and tile the walls and then deal with whatever area is left between tiles and the ceiling. Does that sound like a good approach?
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,896
    Location:
    New England
    sounds good to me. Normally, while maybe not always true, areas above the showerhead is considered 'dry'. It certainly can get some spray, but it's indirect, and not generally a lot.
  8. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple I love these ACO Shower Drains - Best in Class

    Messages:
    3,944
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    I'd do it the way I mention above and if your spraying with a hopper I'd first sand and prime the area to be sprayed.

    I would also practice your spray technique.

    You need to adjust four things to get the pattern right.

    One the pressure of the tank
    Two the nossel position
    three the feed rate.
    And the mix consistancy
  9. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple I love these ACO Shower Drains - Best in Class

    Messages:
    3,944
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Drywall Repair

    [​IMG]

    We damaged the back side of this shower niche doing demolition. We hit the breaks and then started the repair process.

    [​IMG]

    We left the old lath in place and then flat trowelled it with Joint Compound.

    [​IMG]

    Over the damaged waterproofing we installed two coats of Ardex 8+9. Just after the second coat and while wet I pressed in some stucco mesh.

    Over this we infilled the entire area with Concrete Fill from Synko (no concrete!) and then covered the entire area again with joint compound and some of the mesh tape from Fiba Fuse.
  10. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple I love these ACO Shower Drains - Best in Class

    Messages:
    3,944
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    [​IMG]

    Lapping layers of Fiba Fuse. Setting them with Joint Compound.

    [​IMG]

    At this point we treated the area as back to square one and proceed to float out the drywall mud over the entire wall in our quest for a level five drywall finish.

    We do a lot of drywall work here in Vancouver - I'd rethink your game plan and study up more on the spray texture process.
  11. SH140

    SH140 New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Vallejo, Ca.
    Thanks for all the feedback....As far as the texturing, I'll be OK with that. I've already done 1/2 the rooms in the house. They've all got that "popcorn" texture on the ceilings that was so popular in the 70's. As we re-do a room, that crap gets removed and replaced.
  12. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple I love these ACO Shower Drains - Best in Class

    Messages:
    3,944
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    You are going to need to address your seams and corners like they where regualr drywall. Make sure you use a paper tape or mesh tape on these.

    I'd go like I mentioned above with a thin-set flat trowel and then swith to drywall products.

    USe a flat brick as a sanding pad for the thin-set before using drywall compounds.


    Don't get sand and rock dust in your drywall products. Once you have skimmed out the backer board junk that mud so the bulk stays good. If you check out my profile online (Houzz) you will see I'm not stranger to drywall over cement board. This is one of our secret measures for our fireplace builds where we have been doing this approach coming on ten years now.

    JW
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
Similar Threads: Preparing durock
Forum Title Date
Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog CGC Durock Shower System - Review Oct 17, 2013
Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog Which is better for shower surround? Durock or Hardibacker? Jul 23, 2010
Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog Durock over shpwer pan flange Mar 23, 2009
Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog Split Durock Seams in a Shower wall? Nov 4, 2007
Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog Durock or Hardi backer? Mar 30, 2007

Share This Page