No Pressure For Yard Hydrant Unless Pump Is On

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by AlanB, Apr 16, 2006.

  1. AlanB

    AlanB New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Over the winter I installed a new holding tank, pressure switch, etc. in the house. Works mint. Now this spring my yard hydrant didn't work. The hydrant is off the same line that comes to the house. I dug up the hydrant, thinking that was the issue. Then I see water comes out of the line only when the pump is activated (yes, I dug it up for nothing). So basically when the hydrant is on I get no water unless the pump is on too. Shouldn't the hydrant work and activate the pump if needed? I'm a little confused because this all worked fine for the last 10 years with my old set up (holding tank, pressure switch, etc.). The reason I replaced all that to begin with is becasue the pump was constantly going on and off, due to a busted bladder. I added air about once a month for the last year or so before I finally got around to replacing it. Long story short, the only time I can use my hydrant is when my pump is going. Any suggestions? :confused:
    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2007
  2. Duane Smith

    Duane Smith New Member

    Messages:
    19
    explain to me what a hydrant is?
  3. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    It sounds like there may be a check valve between the hydrant and the pressure tank.
  4. If the hydrant is on old galvanized pipe, that may be the problem and the line may need to be replaced.
    As you know, obsolete galvanized pipe is notorious for scaling up inside, restricting the flow, until it eventually plugs up completely.
    Good Luck!
    Mike
  5. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    A hydrant is a freezeless faucet that can be installed anywhere in your yard.

    I agree with BobNH, remove the check valve that was obviously not there on the old install.

    bob...
  6. AlanB

    AlanB New Member

    Messages:
    4
    You're right, I did put in a check valve where there wasn't one before. I will take it out and see what happens. I take it I don't need a check valve? Someone told me I should put one in if I am replacing everything anyway.
  7. AlanB

    AlanB New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Maybe it would make sense to move the check valve after the pressure switch, instead of before like it is now? Or do I just take it out all together? Just not sure I understand the purpose of the check valve.
  8. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    There is almost certainly a check valve in your submersible pump. If you put one after the pressure tank so the pressure tank would supply the hydrant, then you would create another problem with expansion in your water heater creating excessive pressure.

    If it is a swing check you might save yourself some plumbing by simply taking the flapper out of the check valve.

    A check valve permits flow in only one direction. You need one somewhere to prevent water flowing back through the pump when the pump is off. The usual location is in the submersible pump, or as part of a "foot valve" if you have a shallow well jet pump.
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2006
  9. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I would remove it completely. It is not needed and is a health hazard believe it or not.

    bob...
  10. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Do I misunderstand something about check valves. If the flapper or poppet of a check valve is removed, how can it be a safety problem? Does it not have the same effect as removing the valve?

    If the flapper or the poppet is removed it is the same as removing the valve and it avoids the need for new fittings and length adjustments.

    The safety issue is because the line between the check valve and the pump can develop a vacuum below/behind the check valve and cause contaminated water to be sucked into a leaky pipe.
  11. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    Sorry Bob, I didn't read that part of your post. First of all I would never use a flapper type check valve in a pressure application. It makes for a real water hammer problem. But if he wanted to remove the valve, or flapper either would be fine.

    bob...
  12. AlanB

    AlanB New Member

    Messages:
    4
    I took you up on the advice and decided to leave the check valve in and removed the guts of the valve (I think I had the poppet stype, I removed the spring O-ring assembly from inside the valve). The hydrant works beautifully. Thank you so much for the help.

    [​IMG]
    They make yard hydrants that are self draining for winter use.
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2009
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