New Construction Plumbing Layout

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by eyeglow, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. eyeglow

    eyeglow New Member

    Messages:
    14
    I'm on the final phase of my home plans but the plumbing layout has me stumped. I'm including an attachment in the hopes a plumbing person can tell me if I'm going in the right direction. I have no idea how to layout this pipe work...Only guessing at this. House is on a raised foundation and I'm in Southern Calif if that helps. Thank you

    Attached Files:

  2. kordts

    kordts In the Trades

    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    exurban Chicago
    Last edited by a moderator: May 24, 2010
  3. a little sloppy

    of course you are going to get a whole bunch of opinions here
    just like when you ask directions from a crowd of people...

    so get ready for a big debate..

    The only thing that I would certanly change..is the kitchen line

    come off the 4 inch well before you get to the bathroom
    to run to to the laundry.....run 2 inch over into that area.....

    Shoot directly for the laundry makeing it the MAIN run.. then come off with a wye along the way for the kit ....vent both together above the floor going out the roof or whatever is code...for vents.

    you dont want all that laundry water to come crashing into a joint at
    the kitchen and then makeing a turn...you want it to flatten out
    in the pipe before it passes the kitchen......if that makes sense ...
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    The bathroom is probably ok because you are running a 4 inch
    drain.... but you will get many opinions here...


    but I would probably kill that double wye under the floor.
    (personal preference) Though it probably would work ok
    being so large a pipe and a vent going to the lavaroty
    in the same joint.......that is up for debate......


    come off the line going to the lavatory with a wye for the drain to the shower which gives the shower a wet vent off the lavatory do all this in 2 inch.... ( again personal preference)

    either way will probably pass ok

    of course the lavatory vent going out the roof is the vent for the whole bathroom group , I dont know what size vent is legal in california, but here I can get away with a 1 1/2 vent

    have fun fun fun
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2006
  4. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Messages:
    941
    If it's a raised foundation, then is there any reason to run through the center of the floorplan? Why not run the laundry/kitchen line 'west' to the nw corner of the house, then south along the foundation. Similarly, the bathroom gp would run 'south' and then at the southern wall of the foundation, turn west to the septic.

    Supporting the drains against the foundation instead of the floor joists can reduce the noise transmission thru the floor.

    Also this way yr vents can run up the external wall instead of trying to finagle them through interiors.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,491
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    plumbing

    The picture looks good as a general idea, but so has every other plan view of a plumbing system. The real test is when you do the actual installation because that is when all the vagaries come in that cannot show in a drawing such as yours. It is also the reason building departments want isometric drawings because they also show the vertical pipes and how connections are being made.
  6. mn_nobody

    mn_nobody New Member

    Messages:
    18
    definately move your wye for the kitchen and the wash box further back behind the bathroom group. you don't want the washer dumping water into the main drain ahead of the bathroom group.
  7. eyeglow

    eyeglow New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Revamped Plan - Am I getting close?

    I want to thank everyone for there response to my questions. I hope I'm heading in the right direction on this. I like the idea of running the pipe along the outside, it just looks cleaner. However, I'm no plumber so please let me know if this is not acceptable. I have other questions..

    1: Kitchen vent, can I vent both the washer and kitchen sink through the outside wall (note where circle and arrow are placed)? I made that whole line 2" and vent 2", is that correct?

    2: Bathroom - will I need three separate pipes that go up into the attic for venting, then put all of them together so only one vent comes out of the roof?

    3: I understand the bath sink needs an S trap and a bathtub also needs an S trap. However, I just have a shower so I need to find out if the shower is the same as a bath.... needing an S trap or can I just us an elbow?

    Here's the new sketch:

    Thanks again,

    Attached Files:

  8. it is not that good

    it actually looked better the first way you had it

    all those bends around the corners of the house are

    only going to clog up someday...

    and a longer run to have to clean out someday


    though I dont know if this is a basement or a crawl space

    if it is a crawl I would go the path of least resistaqnce


    It will all work out.....

    if you got a fax number..........leave it here






  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,491
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    plumbing

    You are regressing and making the system worse. I install the plumbing the most direct and shortest way possible. With that in mind, I would put the vertical stack behind the lavatory. The toilet would connect with a fitting we call a "Wisconsin", Chicago calls a "cottage tee", and MA calls an Easterbrook, which would be angled towards the toilet's location. The 2" side branch would go to the tub. If the distance were too long then I would install a secondary vent on it.
  10. draw Wye's not T's where you intend to put Wye's.

    Don't call p traps 'S traps'. Showers need P-traps. Everything needs a P trap. Except toilets, as they already have one inside at the bottom of the bowl.

    Put a Wye near the toilet, to connect the sink. Put another Wye downstream, but still close, to connect the shower. This will give better venting that will ensure the toilet flushes as it was designed to. Otherwise it may swirl water for a second or two, and then whoosh fast and even open up its P trap letting sewer gases come out before the fill mechanism fills the bowl and tank again.

    A single vent for your bathroom group is sufficient. 2". If the vent can go to your sink, then your shower will have venting upstream of its Wye. This is good.


    I am not a plumber. Not do I play one for friends and family.

    david
  11. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Messages:
    941
    I don't believe it's ok to vent plumbing vents THROUGH the outside wall ( exhaust fan/hood vent/dryer vents are ok). Plumbing vents release sewer gasses which can be harmful to people, so there are clearance requirements from windows and doors. The safest thing is to vent through the roof.

    I'm not a pro, so I defer to their opinion that plumbing lines shld be as straight and short as poss. How big is the space under the floor? If it's a basement, then going down the center of the ceiling cuts the head space. I think that's why the bldr did it that way in my home (although I do have a spec house from a nat'l builder, and there perhaps there were cost-cutting reasons they did it...)
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2006
  12. eyeglow

    eyeglow New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Lets try again..

    Ok, I went back to the old print and hopefully I was able to understand what I was suppose to do. I had no idea it was this hard to put this together. I changed some things. I also forgot to put in the main water line and where to connect it to. I can do most things but plumbing is NOT one of them as you can well see. It just isn't sinking in.

    Attached Files:

  13. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    O.K. instead of going from the 4" line to the kitchen go directly to the washing machine, straight line, and use 2" pipe. Then go from the kitchen to the 2" line.

    Your drawing has it the other way around.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2010
  14. all Wyes, see below.

    not hard, no worry,:) eyeglow. Your last drawing is good. :D

    In addition to the two Wyes marked as Wyes you have two other ones. However, it is obvious that they are Wyes since the geometry of the lines shows their shape. If you write that two are Wyes, and not the other two, you raise doubts and questions. OK, I know I'm picking nits.;)

    I drew a line drawing. I'm not there, I don't have a view, I can't see what challenges you really have -- so do not rely on my ideas, or on this drawing, for anything other than the fact that it shows some concepts.

    You read earlier that master plumber Mark said to make the washing machine line a straight line. Cass just said it again a few minutes ago. That is what I drew here.

    I drew a little circle near the bathroom sink, on the drain line. This is where I might put a vent going up inside the wall. I repeat, that I am not on site, nor do I want to be. You will do things differently, because you have to. There is a limit as to how much you can get done over the phone when the expert is not on premises. Worse, I am not an expert, and I have not seen your place even once. Reality will dictate other solutions. Let this be understood.

    I might use a 3" diameter pipe for the toilet. Either all the way to the outside, or up till the last connection, or up till the shower connection. That could be worth a discussion here. Reason: solids flush better in a 3" pipe -- proven in a CMHC study, which I might be able to locate and point to later.

    david
    p.s. You can right-click on the image and "save as" or copy onto your computer. Size is 4k.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 20, 2006
  15. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,491
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    pipe size

    Because of velocity issues, a larger pipe than necessary is not always a desirable thing.
  16. eyeglow

    eyeglow New Member

    Messages:
    14
    New Drawing

    Thanks everyone for the info... Hopefully this new drawing is getting me closer. On the new drawing I didn't draw in where the vents will be but I'm assuming that the bathroom one can be vented right above the first Wye after the toilet. Is that correct? The next vent is in the interior wall in the washer line. By the way, thanks for the info on the drain line. I assumed that bigger was better... Now I understand it's not.

    Attached Files:

  17. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Messages:
    941
    I know the pros counselled you to do everything straight and that those angles are fine. But in the bathroom is there really a need to run at 45's?

    The problem(?) with yr bathroom layout is that you can only have 1 vent for the whole bathroom since the drain doesn't pass under a wall cavity until after the wye. If you ran each fixture first into its respective wall, you can vent up individually through it and loop the vents together. In fact, if u don't vent until after the wyes, then wouldn't you be creating an s-trap condition on that sink? (Unless yr planning to run the drain 18" above ground to the junction). You'd need a vent at the point it goes into into the floor else you risk a siphon there.

    I've seen it written time and time again here that fixtures SHOULD be indiv vented.

    Where's your kitchen sink vent gonna be? Are you planning to run horiz under the window along the xterior wall and tie into the laundry vent?
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2006
  18. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

    Messages:
    2,714
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Hard to tell from the drawing if those are really 45s or not. You might be able to use a couple of 1/16 bends in the drains and lay things out so you could vent the sink and shower drains as they pass under the wall.
  19. eyeglow

    eyeglow New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Vent Pipe

    I don't think it will be a 45, it will end up more like 1 16 bend. The house is up 30" off the ground. The 3" drain pipe will start out at the toilet then it must be buried in the ground before it hits the front porch (located next to the septic tank). So there's only 12' to make the drop. My guess is that anything in that pipe will slide fast...or so I think.:D

    I'm having a real problem understanding the venting system. In the kitchen, I can't vent the sink right there because of the windows. Another poster thought I couldn't use outside walls to vent so I switched to the inner wall. I thought I could use the one vent in that inner wall to vent the kitchen sink and washer.
    I hope this helps better understand the drawing.
  20. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    The kitchen sink can be vented. You can run your vent down beside the window and hit the T there. You can use outside walls. You can use inner wals also. Use what ever is easy.
Similar Threads: Construction Plumbing
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Plumbing waste and vent layout for new construction Jul 18, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Need advice on drain plumbing for new construction Feb 25, 2012
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Plumbing Testing - New Construction May 4, 2009
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & plumbing order- new construction Nov 27, 2007
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & New Construction Drain Question Feb 6, 2014

Share This Page