Kitchen SS Stainless Steel Sink to Granite

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by eddie57, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. eddie57

    eddie57 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Texas
    Hi,

    My undermounted Stainless Steel sink fell off the granite countertop. It was attached with epoxy I believe with no other reinforcement. Can someone with experience in this type of work provide some instructions on reattaching the sink to the granite. Thanks in advance.

    Eddie
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,889
    Location:
    New England
    Epoxy, if allowed to cure properly, should have held it.

    The granite shop I've worked with mills T-slots in the stone, and supplies T-bolts and clamps to hold the sink in place (in addition to a good silicon - the clamps hold the thing in place while the silicon cures). Drilling granite without the right tools is asking for cracks.

    You can build a cage around the sink that goes to the floor or maybe you could get away with the cabinet sidewalls to hold it in place after putting some silicon on the edges. This may be the least chance of damaging the granite when it wasn't prepared well for the sink. Getting it around where the faucet and the front may be problematic, since there often isn't much room, but you can probably work something out.

    Sometimes, people will drill holes, epoxy in threaded adapters or studs, then use a clamp on them, but doing it to an existing slab from underneath with a hand drill is risky if you haven't done it much...get things cocked just a little, the bit binds, and you'll crack things. Plus, the bits need to be kept wet to work, and that's both though and messy upside-down.
  3. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    I don't see any type of glue-on being satisfactory for a kitchen sink. I have seen way to many lav sinks fall off, and a kitchen sink is too heavy a load, and epoxy probably doesn't stick all that well to SS. There are excellent undermount support strut systems for kitchen sinks. See a good kitchen and bath shop. Most of the sink mfg, eg. kohler, amstd, etc have these kits.
  4. eddie57

    eddie57 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Texas
    followup

    You say epoxy won't work. Would you recommended silicon instead?

    Thanks for the replies.

    Eddie
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,889
    Location:
    New England
    You need something in addition to the sealant/glue to help hold it in place. You can either make a frame, or buy one. This will support the sink, and let the silicon or epoxy seal it, rather than being the only support. I'd go with silicon and a frame, whether you build it, or buy it.
  6. eddie57

    eddie57 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Texas
    Thank you for taking the time to reply. I appreciate it.

    Eddie
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,485
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    My first thought was that it must not have been a very experienced granite installer, because ALL the good ones anchor the sink to the granite and just use the silicone to seal the joint. There is no good "do it yourself" way to mount the sink to the granite so a support frame and caulking is the best you can do.
  8. Rob Parisi

    Rob Parisi New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    New Hampshire
  9. rick52768

    rick52768 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Horse Capital of the World
    Related question, how long does the sealant/caulk/silicone take to dry? The reason I ask as my new ss sink and granite countertop was finished Thursday at 11:30 am, it is Saturday night at 7:47 and it is not completely clear (goes on white, dries clear). Wife just used the sink to wash a few dishes and splashed some water on the sealant and it is now bright white. Installers told me the it would safe in 24 hours. They put a butt load on sealant on the sink edge and I think that may be the reason it is still not dry. Anything I can do about the bright white areas? BTW, they used sealant and wood strips to hold up the sink as it dry and nothing else. Thanks
  10. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,889
    Location:
    New England
    Depends on a couple of things - if the stuff was expired, it may never cure properly, but some stuff is rated as taking a week to cure. Without knowing what they used, it's hard to say. Silicon can create a pretty substantial bond, but the fabricator I've used mills T-slots in the granite and supplies T-bolts and clamps to help in holding things in place. This is a (in my mind) more secure way, since it contains both a glue and the mechanical bond.
  11. big2bird

    big2bird IBEW Electrician

    Messages:
    141
    Location:
    Anaheim, Ca.
    That does not sound good. T-slots, epoxy anchors, cage = good. Sealant is NOT a mechanical fastening means.
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,485
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The Kohler K-5807 undersink mounting system WOULD work but you would have to insert the sink and support rails at the same time.
  13. TJanak

    TJanak New Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    South TX
    This is what my granite installer did on all four sides of my sink. Holding so far.
    20121216_103009.jpg
  14. rick52768

    rick52768 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Horse Capital of the World
    They opened the tube in my kitchen, but I guess that has nothing to its age. I looks like is still curing (getting clearer) and the couple of spots that got wet, after 48 hours of drying, seems to drying clear just not 100% yet. I plan to "trim" the sealant on the divider between the bowls with a very sharp razor as I do not like the look. Just making sure not to scratching the sink. It is a non-reveal sink and I can only see the sealant in other area if I put my head in toward the sink. I also have the wood strips, front and back of sink, that are giving at least some mechanical support. Just like most things in life, I like doing the research and doing the work myself taking care of the end result and looks, but installing heavy granite is not an option for me.
  15. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,889
    Location:
    New England
    With the cost of granite and the potential risk of cracking the slab, it's often much safer to have a pro install it. I've dealt with smaller slabs that could be handled by one person like for a vanity, but two (or more) is often better if there's room. That being said, I've installed one kitchen and two vanity sinks on slabs that I picked up from the fabricator myself. I had to make a frame to hold them vertical and steady to get them home, but I had some scraps.
  16. big2bird

    big2bird IBEW Electrician

    Messages:
    141
    Location:
    Anaheim, Ca.
    counterdone 053.jpg
    Yep. This puppy is over 4' wide, and 9' long. Took 6 guys to carry it in, and weighed almost 800 lbs. Not a DIY project at all.
  17. kitchenbathsinks.com

    kitchenbathsinks.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
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