Good news for some folks...:)

Discussion in 'Health and Wellness Forum' started by Cookie, Nov 13, 2010.

  1. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    OTTAWA — Canadians diagnosed with cancer are living longer and the survival rate for sufferers of a number of cancers, including leukemia, has increased dramatically, a Statistics Canada report released Wednesday showed.

    After looking at the five-year relative survival ratio for patients, the federal agency reported the survival rate for Canadians diagnosed with any type of cancer between 2004 and 2006 was 62 per cent, a six per cent increase from data from 1992 to 1994.

    “It’s particularly encouraging to see that there’s been an increase in survival for several types of cancer like leukemia, thyroid, liver and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Those types of cancers have low survival rates traditionally,†said Prithwish De, an epidemiologist with the Canadian Cancer Society.

    He said advancements in cancer treatment and improvements with early detection are “two major factors that really made a difference in fighting cancer in Canada.â€

    The report suggested that compared with people without cancer, “those diagnosed with cancer are predicted to have about three-fifths the probability of surviving the next five years.â€

    The five-year relative survival ratios for those diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 ranged from six per cent for pancreatic cancer; 88 per cent for breast cancer; 89 per cent for skin melanoma; and 98 per cent for thyroid cancer.

    Low increases were recorded in esophagus cancer, which only had a 13 per cent survival rate and lung cancer, which had a 16 per cent chance of survival.

    The 10-year relative survival ratio for all the cancers studied was 58 per cent.

    After compiling data from 1992 to 1994 and 2004 to 2006, the agency said leukemia patients saw an increased survival rate: to 54 per cent from 44 per cent and for those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, survival rose to 63 per cent from 51 per cent.

    For cancers with a poor long-term prognosis, the probability of dying was highest in the time immediately after diagnosis, the report said.

    It also suggested younger patients had a much greater chance of survival. For example, the five-year relative survival rate for brain cancer was 58 per cent for Canadians between 15 and 44 years old compared to only nine per cent for those between 65 and 74.

    But De also conceded the country’s medical experts still have a lot of research to do as the increase in the number of cancer diagnoses continues to climb due to an aging and growing population. Some forms of cancer receive less research in treatment and patient care, such as lung cancer, and despite investigation incidence, rates still climb. The survival rate for lung cancer, although it has increased, has not increased significantly and incidence rates for this cancer have continued to rise for women.

    “This tells us there still needs to be a lot of work done in improving cancer survival rate in men and women. There’s lots of room for improvement,†he said.

    An estimated 173,800 cases of cancer will be detected and 76,200 deaths will occur in Canada in 2010, according to the CCS, which says lung cancer accounts for over a quarter of all cancer deaths in Canada each year.



    Read more: http://www.canada.com/health/Cancer...tatsCan says/3527951/story.html#ixzz15D9VL1Ki
  2. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  3. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    That guy, that is an absolutely amazing article.
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  4. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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    I'll have to read it several times to get all what they are really telling us. It's definitely not light reading.

    I would subscribe to the New Yorker because they have stuff that interests me once in a while, but they do seem full of themselves. Their cartoons are good.

    My memories of NYC are not the most favorable. Nowadays I can stand that place for maybe a half-day. Sometime I'll have to talk about how my wife and I outwitted a mugger.
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  5. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    I love the New Yorker, it has always been one of my favorites.

    Yeah, NY is not the safest place to be, I always loved that movie, with Jack Lemon , oh, I can't think of the name. But, it was funny.

    But, what happened to you and your wife? I can assume it all worked out well? I hope so.
  6. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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    This one?
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066193/

    Yes, I didn't have to use my backup plan, which was a screwdriver with an 8" shaft up the sleeve of my coat. If anyone asked I'd say I was carrying this thing because I was having carburetor trouble and it needed constant adjustment.

    BTW, we were coming back from a martial arts tournament at Madison Square Garden in which I won a 4th place trophy for losing to the 3rd place winner. This, because there weren't too many contestants in my division, which was the "What the he!! am I doing here?" division. :D
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  7. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    Yes, that is the movie, I could watch that movie over and over and still laugh. That is one funny movie. They were perfect together.

    So, you literally had something up your sleeve. lol. Good for you. I hope they ran like hell.

    You must be good at marital arts :)
  8. Thatguy

    Thatguy Homeowner

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    Marital arts? Is that a slip of the tongue? :D
    Will the stuff I learned while being single help?

    As to martial arts, running my hand through a table saw kind of put a kink in my technique. And my teacher
    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...r37DQ&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=17&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0
    dying didn't help much, either.

    My claim to fame is that this guy
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Critzos_II
    taught me to keep my guard up by kicking me in the side of the head just hard enough to teach me a lesson.

    This girl
    http://www.lacancha.com/marcellabyrd.html
    taught me to spar.
    She always landed punches on me and it was 3 weeks before I landed a single punch. Both of us almost fell over from surprise.
    She won in the women's divisions so then she fought in the men's divisions. And she still won.

    I will say that when I first went to the studio
    the black belts were moving awfully fast
    and when I left
    the white belts were moving awfully slowly.
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  9. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    I can't believe I did that. lol. :)

    That girl looks tough, I wouldn't want to tangle with her. I work next door to a Nail Salon run by Orientals and, when they don't turn on their fan the stench comes over my way. I am brave... I walk over, and tell them, " you get to wear masks, I don't, I get to sit and breath this carcinogen, and that I don't need" then, I run like hell because they get very mad. They start shouting in chinese or something, something I don't understand, but it doesn't sound good. They also, own... a Martial arts place. :) Others I work with say, " we are afraid to tell them" I tell them, I am more afraid of you know what, than them...I am very brave. One day, the man asked me my name, I gave him, my bosses. :)
  10. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    Great to see that our northern neighbor with universal healthcare is really starting to combat this terrible disease.

    Perhaps America will catch up one day?

    Who would have thought that having access to treatment, even if a person can't afford it, can save your life?

    Genius, eh? But perhaps too complicated to be taught in American schools. :rolleyes:
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  11. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    What maybe the plumbers here do not realize is that their's is the second most prone occupation to the big C. First one is due to abstetoes which causes Mesothelioma; the second for plumbers is Non-Hodgkins due to chemicals found where they may be working or what they are working with. So, this is a serious problem with plumbers and their families because it is sometimes brought home on shoes & clothing or just on their own person, hair, etc.

    Nothing is ever perfect Ian, no county is perfect. I am not sure if you are aware of this Ian, but your country has the most cases of Mesothelioma, than any other and, that is a fact.
  12. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    I know I said this once, but if you don't remember Ian, alot, I am talking a flood... of people come from Canada for not only a diagnosis, but our treatments for the big C, here in the US.
  13. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    Many countries come to the US for treatments for the big C. Many many people. Why is that Ian?
  14. Peanut9199

    Peanut9199 Customer Service Manager Plumbing Wholesale

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    I know Canada sends a lot of people not only for Cancer treatment but for MRI's, Cat scans, major surgery.
    I can tell you why as well it's because when a nurse or Doctor graduates from a Canadian University they go where the money is and that's the US.
    We pay nothing here for professionals and also we cut back on nurses, beds... and then send everyone to the US and pay for the procedures.
    I had a MRI two months ago at 3:00 am that was the only time available because we are so backed up and we don't have the man power or machines to cover it.

    But the article was more about early detection and that's what people need to know, i'm 42 and never had a physical (i know stupid).
  15. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    An annual is good but like in my case, as in many folks, I had no symptoms, until, I started to lose my hearing. The ENT who usually saw my kids couldn't see me on the scheduled appt and I got another doctor who thought the bump by my ear was just a muscle, and he put me on muscle relaxers. Within that month I totally lost my hearing in that ear and never regained it; it was NHL. So, many times, with that big C as with many, it is not recognized. We have much more advanced procedures, scans, treatments and drugs than most all other countries. We have trials, and more funding than most. The US gets things passed sooner, and honestly, as much as people might not want to hear this, when you are dealing with a potentially fatal problem, time if of the essence, and one thing that you must accept with this, is the fact that all side effects, and results may not be known when first taken, but, one thing we do know is the usual result of untreated, or unstopped major diseases. Nice to hear from you Peanut.
  16. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    OK. Here's the bottom line.

    If I get cancer in the US and I am flat broke with no insurance do I get the same level of care as someone here who earns US$100,000 a year and has private insurance?

    If so, you have a great system.

    If not, it sucks.
  17. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    The bottom line is survival, here in the US, depending on the kind of the big C, you have a greater chance of seeing another tomorrow. There are never any guarantees in anything. But, if I get any kind of illness, with what I have learned, I will pick the US to get it in.
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2010
  18. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    So even the poor survive. Thank God for that.

    Who pays? Medicare?
  19. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    You got a small view point of America. There are many ways for people to get what they need. You don't have to be a genius to do it either. And, no, nothing everything here is done by the govn. I made a promise I would never divulge names here, and I won't; but I have found many plumbers and tradesman here funding for treatments. I have in my travels with my own health problems developed a keen sense of what it is all about. Without wanting to have the knowledge of all of this, I did anyways, and I might as well put it good to use and make something positive out of it all. One plumber's daughter is doing great today, which I LOVE, not always the case though. I am fortunate to have the inns with it all and I want to share it. Those who had contacted me, I directed them to places, to the right providers, the best doctors, provided info on scans, costs, stats, and, when needed, I was and just am here. I don't have all the answers nor do, or ever will pretend to, but, I will stand by what I said in the prior post. This is the country for potentially fatal problems.

    . Funding can come from many places, just not your churches either. I raise money as a hobby for kids heading into college, I set one up years ago in science for my husband. The money I raised also was offered to plumbers for their kids. College is expensive but doable even for those who are poor. I am poor. Both my kids went to college. Ah, Ian, their just isn't enough space here to put it all, and I would bore others plumb silly.
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2010
  20. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    Sigh. The last thing any person should have to worry about when they are sick is where to get the money from for their treatment.

    Lost earnings is bad enough.

    How can Americans sleep at night?
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