Does this roofing material look okay?

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by leejosepho, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    My son-in-law and I are about ready for roofing on our two-story addition, and we are planning to use these flexible, corrugated, asphalt-impregnated composite panels. We have a 3-12 pitch, blocks at all sheathing seams and we plan to use 30# felt paper. We chose this stuff over regular shingles because the most it should ever need is re-painted rather than replaced.

    Does anybody have any opinion or actual experience with this product?

    http://www.ondura.com/waves.htm

    Attached Files:

  2. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    opinions on roofing.com were split. I'll ask my cousins today, they have been roofing for C.P. Morgan for 20 years, it's the family business. I haven't heard of it but looks interesting and easy. I just put a new roof on ours before we started the remodel and after reading some prices on roofing.com I feel for folks out east paying a ton to have a roof put on. It only averages $25 a square + materials around here for new/prepped roofs. East coast guys were charging $150 and up a square!!
  3. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    Holy crap! $25/square. Are you talking about guys working out of the back of a truck?

    Some folks around here charge up to $200/square for tear off and laying.

    Tom
  4. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Nope, no hacks here. Like I said my family has been contracted with several of the largest builders around for decades, about 20 guys knocking out 1-3 houses a day. It's about $25 a square per layer whether it's coming off or going down, nasty cutup customs are obviously more but not outrageous and that's straight labor rate no materials at all. The housing market is down 60% in Indiana and falling. Our neighbors sold off their farm last year. 110 acres, beautiful 5 bedroom house, 2 ponds, 2 large outbuildings for only $500,000. Housing and land in rural Indiana is very affordable along with skilled labor. The gov't. has finally realized it might be time to do something about illegals and taxes but it's a little late for that, that's a whole other topic as well. :)
  5. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    Just got off the phone with my cousin. He said it doesn't get used around here due to pricing compared to regular shingles. He did say he's heard good things otherwise and that from the guys he's talked to that use it say it lasts a long time, just needs painting every 4 or 5 years but it is heavily reliant on a good install to prevent leaks. Also he said the going labor rate per square in Indy is closer to $20 now :eek: He did say insurance is alot higher on the coasts than it is here which adds a significant cost increase for legit roofers who actually carry insurance.
  6. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    I don't know how roofers are making a profit. Wow. Pretty unreal.

    For that labor rate I might have considered flying the crew out to Michigan for 2-3 days.

    Tom
  7. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    With the closure strips, special nails, ridge vents and caps, the materials are costing us just over $100.00 per square.

    The cover coating (including labor) is pro-rate-warrantied for 10 years, and I am sure we can do a fine installation!
  8. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
  9. Woodbutcher

    Woodbutcher General Contractor for 18 yrs

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Why would you want to buy a roofing material that needs to be painted every 3-5 yrs, and take the chance of an accident every 3-5 yrs. Also take the noise consideration as a factor, will this be a loud product when it rains? Architectural shingles are great looking, get up to 50 yrs of warranty and no painting. If I was to install a ribbed roofing material, it would be of metal.

    You do not no longer install the screws on the ribs but in the valleys between the ribs. This is a proven method for less chances of leakage. Yes metal is also loud and more expensive, but once again no painting is required, so in the long run it would be cheaper.
  10. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    I do not know that to be the actual case. The manufacturer warranties the finish for ten years, and we expect to have to paint it sometime after that. In any case, painting it every ten years or so will cost far less and can be done in a day as opposed to replacing shingles ... and since we are not getting younger as the days roll on, those are some of the reasons we decided as we did.

    Large hail could be a factor there, but with all things considered, that is a chance we are willing to take.

    We will find out, but I do not think so. We are using 30# paper underneath, and we will have 15" of blown insulation just below a 3-1/2" air/venting gap.

    We considered that, but ...

    ... and either roof would need to be replaced following damaging hail.
  11. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    I didn't even think to ask where you live. I did read where snow loads could be a concern with this roofing material. I looked at M enards this morning after I got off work and they didn't have any that I could find. I think if your in a warmer climate this would be a nice alternative to shingles but here in Indy between the tornados and winter weather I'd stick with shingles. Yes the dimensionals are really nice and last for decades but they are heavy and will add extra load on a roof which isn't bad if it's new and no other layers but putting them over an existing roof adds substantial weight. Also as far as noise goes, these are asphalt coated so noise should be the same as fiberglass shingles and I haven't seen a metal corrugated roof that looks better unpainted. We have two large hay barns with metal corrugated roofs and we have to paint them every 4-5 years if we want them to keep from rusting and looking good.
  12. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    We are a little north of you in lake-effect snow country, but I have read this stuff is good for a snow load of 500 lbs. per sf. Again, we have a sheathed surface rather than perlins.

    Apart from shingles versus metal or whatever, my concern at the moment is whether 7/16" OSB is enough for the subsurface. We might just add a thin layer of plywood over that before going any farther.
  13. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    That's a good question on your decking. I don't have to worry about it with ours. Since it was built in the 60's we have 1"x6" boards for our decking, stuff is still as solid as the day they built it I'm sure. We actually had to crank up our nailing guns when we put the new roof on this summer to get the nails to go in all the way. If it's screwed down I wouldn't worry too much, but I might be worried about just nailing it to 7/16. Good question for someone who installs it on a regular basis, but 7/16 is the common decking these days so they'll probably tell you it's fine. Is this going on a truss or stick-frame roof?

    Also just checked out the ondura site, I think you have one too many zeros in the snow load rating. The site says 55 psf which is what I had heard.
    http://www.ondura.com/agricultural.htm


    Brian
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2007
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,019
    Location:
    New England
    Most of the better metal roofing is covered with Kynar or similar coatings...very durable, very color stable, and the metal is often aluminum, which doesn't rust, either. The metal roofing, if designed with an air gap, is an excellent radiant barrier as well and fireproof. They can be a truly lifetime roof. If I were going to build a new home, this is what I'd use.
  15. GregO

    GregO New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Virginia
    ondura

    I've used this material before (when it was called onduline) and wouldn't recommend it for anything other than a shed or barn roof. The material itself can last, but won't wear as well as standard fiberglass/asphalt shingles, especially if you or someone will be "walking" on it routinely to clean gutters, for example.

    What bugs me most is that the nails or screws used to anchor it are mostly exposed with only a rubber o-ring to seal. Traditional roofing materials leave only two to four nails "exposed" to the elements - the last ridge cap.
  16. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    The trusses are already up and the OSB is tacked down.

    That rating is in the agricultural section where the material is assumed to be placed on perlins (probably at 12" o.c.) rather than on a flat deck. Nevertheless, yes, maybe I did mis-read something else somewhere else.

    We will have no need to routinely walk on it later, so that will not be an issue.

    Yes, standard shingles will last longer until they must be replaced, but it is possible this stuff will never need to be replaced.

    There are actually nearly-dime-size neoprene(?) washers under the nail heads, but I had not thought about all those heads still being exposed.

    Does butyl caulk come in colors? We will be putting a little under each washer, and it would only take another moment to smear a drop on the head of each nail as we go along.
  17. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    If we could afford lifetime metal, surely we also would put a new house directly under it! ;)
  18. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    What I was getting at on the truss or stick frame question was that trusses are usually 24" oc opposed to stick frame at 16" oc. Truss systems are cheaper and faster than stick frame but when used with thin decking will allow the roof to sag in between them over time, so I'd maybe throw another layer of decking on before the ondura since you have a truss system if it's doable for you.
  19. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Yes, that is what I am thinking. When I first joined a framing crew 35 years ago, we were sheathing roofs with 5/8" plywood ... then 1/2" ... and eventually even 3/8" with clips. The rest of our old house here has 1x6 decking, and it is time to head back in that kind of direction!
  20. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio

    This may void a warrenty and also by doing that you are changing the MFG.s install procedure...unless it is in the install instructions.
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