Basement rough-in diagram

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by The_Project, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Hello All,
    I have been reading these post quite extensively, as I am getting ready to start my basement bathroom remodel. Previously, there was a raised floor layout, complete with a 'grinder' toilet. The shower and sink ran into a sump pump which pumped into the sewage lines. The bathroom is gone now, except for the water lines.

    I will be breaking the concrete to run the plumbing. I wanted to show you my diagrams and make sure that I am on track. My buddy is a plumber and I verbally ran my plans past him, and will also show him the hard copies as well, but I would like more opinions. He said he would help me where needed, but I am pretty handy.

    The main line will be 3" and run into a sealed ejector pump which will then pump to my main waste line. AAV are now accepted as code here. Here are the diagrams, and I would appreciate any feedback. The shower will be a walk-in type, hence the odd shape. I understand plumbing basics, and have many references to help me along.

    I tried to explain my fittings/layout the best I could. Due to the layout, it was kind of hard to do anything 3D. I could try a different view if this is too confusing.

    Thanks,
    Jason

    Attached Files:

  2. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Looks acceptable. As a heads up, generally most plumbers like to head straight for the water closet.
  3. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    I did consider that, and wasn't sure about what to do there. The problem is that the toilet will sit 24" off the outside concrete wall (18" off the finished wall) whereas the port for the sewage pump crock is only 18" off the ouside concrete wall. Therefore there is a 6" difference. I guess another option would be this diagram. Would this be better? Are there better options?

    Thanks, this forum is great!
    Jason

    Attached Files:

  4. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Straight Lines Best, Need Not be Parallel With Walls

    I know it is easier to draw lines parallel to walls, but you could eliminate those two 45s if you did the following:

    1. Run from your WC directly to the ejector pump basin.
    2. Use that line as the axis for drawing your other fixture connections.

    There is an equally good routing to get to the same locations of your AAV and your shower drain by using the straight line from the WC to the ejector basin as the baseline for your wyes and bends to the vent and shower, and you will have less concrete to break and fewer joints to make.

    Just lay the main line out on the concrete with chalk line and then work at right angles and 45s off that to get to your AAV and shower drain.
  5. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Understandable... that makes sense. Bear with me guys. How does this look? Granted all the angles might not be perfect in this diagram, but it should give you an idea.

    Thanks,
    Jason

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 1, 2006
  6. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Now rotate your wye/45 fitting to vertical so it comes up in your wall and run your 1 1/2 for the sink through the wall and down into it. Less concrete to break. I'm not a master plumber but I think you can use a sanitary tee when you are going vertical/down into the main.

    Run the 1 1/2 from the main to the sink location when you build the stud wall. That is one advantage of doing it yourself.
  7. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    I updated the picture above to reflect your recomendations. Looks like I have made some progress since the original. Does everything look pretty good now?

    Thanks!
    Jason
  8. sulconst2

    sulconst2 New Member

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    205
    Location:
    old bridge nj
    im thinking you need a couple more vents. the volume of drain from the shower could suck air from the toilet. and same could happen to shower when running the sink. the old rule of thumb. every fixture needs a vent. im sure there are cases of approved wet venting. but since this is your home plus you are already breaking a lot of concrete, i would keep going, vent all, then attach vents above the sink. imo
  9. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    So run one more T off of the 3" drain for the toilet? It wouldn't really matter if it was between the toilet and Wye-fitting for the 2" shower drain or beyond that fitting would it? As long as it is withing 6' of the toilet right?

    Thanks,
    Jason
  10. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    You don't need to run another vent. The last version you posted looks good. Perfectly capable and legal since pre '94 days down here.
  11. sulconst2

    sulconst2 New Member

    Messages:
    205
    Location:
    old bridge nj
    3 x 3 x 2 wye between the toilet and shower drain. plus a 2 x 2 x 2 wye after the shower trap. you might be able to wet vent something here but that is beyond me.
  12. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    So what does everyone think? Put a third vent in there? Or would I be fine with the two vents?

    Thanks,
    Jason
  13. The_Project

    The_Project New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Sewage ejector pump

    So it looks like the plumbing is pretty much laid out (at least on paper). Now for another question. Is there anything I need to worry about with the installation of a sewage ejector pump? The current sump pump is in a pit that appears to be no bigger than 18" X 18". The basin for the ejector pump appears to be 18" X 30". What are the chances that I run into problems digging down the additional 12" or so? The pit is directly below the main sewer line leaving the house, so that part is easy. Is it likely that I will run into water while digging? Anything else I need to consider before I start digging?

    Thanks for all the help, it is greatly appreciated,
    - Jason
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