Basement laundry tub - sump+pump or pump-only?

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by whatever, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. whatever

    whatever New Member

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    3
    My basement laundry area does not have proper drainage. I would like to fix it, but I'm completely clueless.

    The main sewage outflow exits the basement at around the three-foot level, and then into a septic tank and field. I would like to install a laundry tub adjacent to the clothes washer, into which the washer would drain. From there, water would need to be pumped up to basement-ceiling height in order to join with the closest available drain, from the bathroom sink upstairs.

    I've been googling and surfing for the last week or two and have found that there seem to be two main ways to accomplish this -- either with a pump attached (via a trap) to the laundry tub drain, and then out through a check valve, or by draining the laundry tub into a floor-sitting sump+pump assembly such as the Drainosaur, also via trap and check valve, I presume.

    I'm confused however as to why I would need to go with a sump assembly when a simple pump attached to the tub drain seems like it would suffice. What does the sump+pump do that the pump doesn't?

    Is there anyone out there who might be able to shed a little light on my confusion? Recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!
  2. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

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    1,423
    Location:
    Florida
    laundry

    You want to use a laundry pump so you don't need to install a sump pump.

    But you need a separate connection to the sewer to connect to.

    You don't trap it because you will create a trap with the head of water that will be formed.

    Put the check valve as close as you can to the laundry pump.
  3. whatever

    whatever New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Thanks for your quick reply!

    Just out of curiosity, is there any reason someone would choose the sump option in this scenario? Pump lifetime, noise, etc.? I only ask because in all my surfing, I saw a number of plans for the sump option but few for the pump option, making me think there must be a reason most people go with a sump...

    So I should be going directly into the sewer instead tapping into the upstairs drainpipe?

    And I understand I'll need a vent of some sort for the pump -- is it okay to vent this into the room, or is that liable to cause odour? Should I tie into the top of the stack for venting?

    And, my stack is cast iron I believe -- is it possible to tap into this somehow? I don't know how easy it would be to cut it due to the location and proximity of nearby piping; can one somehow drill into it and tap in a new fitting?

    Thanks again for your assistance and patience.
  4. sumppumppimp

    sumppumppimp New Member

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    104
  5. prashster

    prashster New Member

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    If you're installing a bathroom with a toilet, you need the sump (actually not a sump, it's called a sewage basin. A sump is not sealed to the ground - you want water to flow into it. A sewage basin is sealed so the effluent does not pass into the earth).

    Think of the sewage basin as a laundry pump on speed. It's bigger, so it can fill up more before the pump kicks on - which is important if you're taking a shower. It holds a bigger, more powerful motor so it can discharge large volumes of water from the toilet or shower quickly. The motor has a grinder or impeller and a larger discharge pipe (2") so that it can pass solids.

    Also, the basin is submersed below ground because the toilet and shower have their drains below the ground. Theoretically, if you only had a couple of sinks that required pumping, you could sit the garbage-can-sized-basin above ground and drain into it just like the rinky-dinkier laundry pump. But that'd be overkill.

    Some people elevate their showers and toilets so that they don't need to submerge their basin or drain lines.
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2006
  6. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

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    1,423
    Location:
    Florida
    If I had to decide between a sump pump or a laundry pump, I would use a laundry pump.......
  7. whatever

    whatever New Member

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    3
    Thank you, that looks interesting. Would you classify that as a laundry pump, or as a sewage basin? I thought a laundry pump would be a pump mechanism hooked directly to the drain of a laundry tub (hanging right below it, in other words). Was I mistaken?

    prashster, thank you for the lingo lesson -- obviously my cluelessness is showing! :eek:

    plumber1, why is that? I hope you don't mind my stupid questions.
  8. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Messages:
    941
    That's a laundry pump. See how it's mounted above ground? Also, a sewage basin would be about 5x as large.
  9. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

    Messages:
    1,423
    Location:
    Florida
    laundry pump

    "Shellback" is a named laundry pump around Michigan.
    It is mounted directly to the 11/2" drain outlet of the laundry tub. It has a 3/4" outlet. You come out of with a close nipple and a swing check and it's piped up and over to the sewer.

    They're not large pumps either.

    "Triangle" is another name brand.

    A sump pump is a lot messier and requires a 24" crock in the floor as a receptacle for the laundry water and in most areas it's not allowed.
  10. sumppumppimp

    sumppumppimp New Member

    Messages:
    104
    This is not a sewage pump, it is basically one of our home sump pumps in a smaller container :cool:
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