am I saving money this way?

Discussion in 'HVAC Heating & Cooling' started by sibi1972, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. sibi1972

    sibi1972 New Member

    Messages:
    32
    10 years ago I replaced my 60 year old, oil fired hot water boiler. It had a input rating of something like 125,000 btu's. I put in a 75,000 btu Peerless because that was bigger by more then 15 percent over the heat loss calc I did, which already had 10 percent added for those COLD days to come. Along with that I broke things up and added 3 more zones to reach 6 in total.

    So far, so good as far as heating the house goes.

    But would I have used less gallons of oil per winter if I had put in a larger boiler, like what I had, 125,000 btu's? Or would that have been a waste of oil?

    I've gotten into long arguments with guys over this. What do 'ya think?

    Sibi
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,296
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    heat

    Unless the boiler was undersized and never shut off when the weather was cold, (in which case you would have saved fuel), the end result should be the same. The larger boiler would have heated faster, so it would shut down sooner. The smaller one would run longer, but since it was using less fuel per minute/hour, it would still be about the same.
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,348
    Location:
    New England
    Short cycles are harder on the equipment and some wasted heat goes up the flue after it completes the cycle, so longer cycles means less waste as well.
  4. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    What he said. Starting & stopping wastes a lot of fuel.

    The most economical boiler is the smallest possible one.
  5. sibi1972

    sibi1972 New Member

    Messages:
    32
    Guys,

    Thanks for the info. I always thought that the min. size boiler that does manage to maintain itself would be less expensive to run. I guess it's a push in a wider range of sizes then I thought.

    Thanks again.

    Sibi
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,348
    Location:
    New England
    The most efficient boilers are those that can adjust to the heat load (a modulating - condensing boiler). Some can adjust down to as low as 20% of their maximum. This allows it to run nearly continuously during the heating season, just meeting the building's needs and maintaining a nice even comfortable temperature.
Similar Threads: saving money
Forum Title Date
HVAC Heating & Cooling Energy Savings and Energy Star rating on Appliances Feb 6, 2011

Share This Page