1/2" Depth Split Escutcheon Cover for 1/2" Pex Tubing

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by wwsmith, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. wwsmith

    wwsmith New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    College Station, TX
    I am using pex for my new office plumbing system. A typical pex angle stop valve has about 5/8" length from the tip of the barb fitting to the body of the valve. A typical split plastic chrome escutcheon cover only has a depth of about 1/4". This means that at least 3/8" length of pex tubing with the brass crimp ring is exposed from the escutcheon cover to the angle stop valve.

    Now in most cases being able to see just a little bit of exposed white pex tubing is no big deal, especially under lavatories and kitchen counters where no one ever looks. But let's say you have a bathroom with a urinal or some other situation where the angle stop valve is easily seen.

    In those cases I would like to use a split escutcheon cover with a depth of 1/2" to 5/8". Such a cover would completely hide the pex tubing stub out and fit snugly between the dry wall and the valve body. Trouble is, I can't seem to find such an animal searching locally or online.

    Anyone know of a source on a 1/2" depth chrome split escutcheon cover for use on 1/2" pex tubing?
  2. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

    Messages:
    836
    Location:
    The granite state
    If you use Uponor pex they have a chrome sleeve that slides over the tube. the ring still shows though.
  3. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,450
    Location:
    Connecticut
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    WHY would you extend the PEX through the wall, instead of using PEX/copper stubs? And if you are going to do it, then you might as well use the "slip on" valves that do not need crimp rings.
  5. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,450
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Maybe on a PEX Repipe where the house had a copper corrosion problem?
  6. wwsmith

    wwsmith New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    College Station, TX
    This is a new construction project for my own office. I am using a few of the pex/copper stubs, particularly for the outside hose bibs, but I really like the idea of just crimping a pex inlet angle stop valve directly to a pex tubing stub out. I believe that will be a very fast and reliable method of placing angle stop valves through out the building. And yes, "shark bite" style slip on angle stop valves would slide on the pex tubing stub out and butt nicely against the drywall with no exposed tubing or crimp ring, but over the years on my own ranch and house use, I have seen those type fittings fail more than all other types. I think the early forms of those fittings (3 and 4 years back) are not as good as what they sell today. Still, I won't use them for a permanent long term application. I have never had a pex crimp connection go bad and that is over a 10 year period.

    I think most people who are doing what I am talking about (crimping an angle stop valve directly to a pex tubing stub out) do not worry about the 5/8" inch length of pex tubing and brass crimp ring that will be seen behind the stop valve. In most locations its no big deal for me either, just wondering if there is a clean way to hide that situation when desired without resorting to using shark bite valves. A two piece escutcheon with a thickness of 1/2" would work nicely. Nobody has ever seen such a thing?
  7. wwsmith

    wwsmith New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    College Station, TX
    While talking to a local plumbing supply house, I learned of a good solution to my problem. We all know that you could stack two of the same escutcheons together and get the desired 1/2" thickness, but it would look like a mistake, not professional at all. However, escutcheons are definitely made with different outer diameters. If you stack two escutcheons of different outer diameters, you essentially create a single shallow bell type escutcheon. The smaller diameter escutcheon goes on last and fits flush against the first and larger escutcheon. I think this will look fine and hide the pex stub out and crimp ring. Both escutcheons need to be split type so that they can be removed easily should the stop valve ever need to be replaced.

    Many thanks to those who responded on this and I hope that others find this solution useful as well.
  8. fieldlab

    fieldlab New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Fire sprinkler trim..

    ..is available that approximates this. A "retrofit split canopy escutcheon" ("box" style). Someplace probably even offers a conical or bell profile.
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    One question relative to urinals. EVERY urinal flush valve I have ever installed has the stop almost directly against the escutcheon which would leave hardly any room for an adapter AND the crimp ring.
  10. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    I don't understand why you would stub out the pex unless you have a corrosion problem.

    What makes you think dong things out of the norm is clever?
  11. Basement_Lurker

    Basement_Lurker One who lurks

    Messages:
    668
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    This is the way new construction is going these days...at least where I am (although I am sure it's like this everywhere). Plumbing and electrical installations are done so sloppy that it's a complete joke. Sadly there are few real tradesmen anymore and an abundance of construction works created by the building boom of recent years.
  12. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The main reason why polybutylene was used years ago, and PEX is now, is because the installers do not need an IQ much higher than a turnip. Often one "technician" comes in ahead of time and drills the holes and mounts the "fixture stubout" devices. Then the "turnip" just has to run the PEX from point A to point B using the predrilled holes. If it gets too "technical" then they are out of their league, and either call for help, or more likely "wing it".
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