wiring a hot tub

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by ShockHazard, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. ShockHazard

    ShockHazard New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    North East Pennsylvania
    60 amp GFCI breaker, 4 wire
    Disconnect outside on the house wall.

    1) Can I legitamatly put a 120 outlet near this disconnect, powered by one of the two leads coming from the GFCI?
    2) Does this outlet need to be, itself a GFCI?
    3) Should the disconnect be a breaker?
    4) If so, what amperage?

    Thanks in advance.
  2. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    Not without a 15 or 20 amp breaker to protect the outlet. And not if the spa instructions say "dedicated circuit."
    It needs to be GFCI protected. If the 60A GFCI feeds a panel. That panel can have a normal breaker that feeds a normal receptacle. But that's a bad design.
    It's not necessary if the 60A GFCI was used earlier in the circuit.

    A better design is to use a four or more space panel where the disconnect would go. Do a load calculation and feed that panel with the correct wires. Put a normal breaker in the main panel to protect those wires. Then use the 60A GFCI in the subpanel. It's also the disconnect. In the subpanel use a normal breaker to feed a GFCI receptacle.

    This way when 120V loads nuisance trip the GFCI there will be less walking and the spa wont shut off.
  3. ShockHazard

    ShockHazard New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    North East Pennsylvania
    Ok, so pulling a 110 out of this 220 setup is okay if it has it's own breaker?

    Second response: Lets say I have this 110 outlet on it own 15 amp breaker, and the whole shabang is gfci protected at the panel. Is is gfci protected, even thought the gfci breaker is predicting a 220 volt load? I'd never try it, I'm simply curious from a design perspective.

    Third response: Makes sense, but is there an issue with a non-gfci circuit running outside, then underground as it travels to this disconnect?

    I never run anything outdoors without a gfci breaker, just as a matter of habit.
  4. ShockHazard

    ShockHazard New Member

    Messages:
    50
    Location:
    North East Pennsylvania
    Lets say I did decide to have a 60 amp breaker in the (primary) box, and another breaker as a disconnect.
    What amperage should it be, or should it simply never be?

    Is there ever an example of a sub panel having only one breaker?
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2013
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,292
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The big question is what is connected to the 60 amp breaker, and can it be converted to a sub panel? You can have as many, or few, breakers in a sub panel as you need. ANY breaker can be the size required for its load, as long as the load's wire capacity is not exceeded.
  6. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    yes
    yes. Happens all the time. Most spas have 120 and 240 volt equipment. For many it's a 240V pump and 120V blower.
    nope, as long as all other issues are to code.
  7. Glennsparky

    Glennsparky New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Oviedo, FL near Orlando
    Any amperage. Below 60A as long as it can still serve the load. Above 60A and it's short circuit interrupt function is superfluous.

    Every portable spa I've ever installed. Two space panel, one double pole GFCI breaker.
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