Washer and Dryer moving upstairs - oak floors

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by jadnashua, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,003
    Location:
    New England
    I'm considering moving my mother's washer and dryer upstairs where there's oak flooring. A leak would be really bad news so I'm probably going to put in a pan underneath the washer. I'm assuming this also must go to a trap, but since it won't (hopefully) get used much, if at all, what's the best way to keep that trap primed? As an aside, would it be legal to plumb it outside directly? That would be one less trap and vent to deal with and a one-time discharge outside shouldn't be a big issue.

    This is an old house (built in the early 50's) that has inadequate venting per today's standards. I could probably get to the one vent upstairs but it would likely mean tearing out plaster for two stories to get to above the flood plane of the things above. Would an AAV (I'm pretty sure they're approved where she lives) be a viable alternative? The inspector did allow me to use one when I put in a new shower for her a few years ago. If it makes any difference, she's on a septic system.
    Not sure how effective they are on a WM.

    I like the look of the Sioux Chief Ott boxes for washing machine supply/drain with the suppressors integrated. Who makes a decent washer pan? I've not looked around for one.
  2. big2bird

    big2bird IBEW Electrician

    Messages:
    141
    Location:
    Anaheim, Ca.
    I just went thru this. The Sioux Chief box with arrestors is killer deal. Mount them together with the two gang cover. Here is a great pan:http://driptite.com/index.htm I am just going to drill a hole and drop it thru the floor into the crawl space. I would say just diverting it away is no more harmfull than a fire sprinkler test fitting outside. Of course, I am an electrician, and no plumber.;)
  3. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

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    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    It would technically be for emergency use only, I'm not sure how this works out for your local code, but I would run it outside if I thought I could get away with it.

    I would never put my washer on a floor finished in oak anyways though.
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,003
    Location:
    New England
    Well, at 85, and getting frail, doesn't want to move, having the WM on the same floor means not paying someone to do all of her laundry. You work with what you have...
  5. dlarrivee

    dlarrivee New Member

    Messages:
    1,172
    Location:
    Canada
    I used an Ox Box in my basement bath/laundry room, I'm a big fan.
  6. 6t7gto

    6t7gto DIY Junior Member

    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    Bedford, Ohio
  7. big2bird

    big2bird IBEW Electrician

    Messages:
    141
    Location:
    Anaheim, Ca.
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The pan SHOULD drain somewhere other than into the plumbing system, so you would not need a trap. IF you connect it to the drainage, and the pipe clogs, the pan will overflow when the washer drains.
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