Treated lumber used for framing and framing nails, dry wall screwsl and cement board?

Discussion in 'Toilet Forum discussions' started by rogerlarry, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. rogerlarry

    rogerlarry New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Chicago
    I thought I was being smart and decided to use ACQ (treated) lumber for the new bathroom I built in my basement, which includes a steam shower. My thoughts were that I wanted to have as much mold and moisture resistance as possible. I framed the entire bathroom and shower stall using treated lumber. I used regular framing nails, dry wall screws and cement board screws. How much trouble can I expect? And by trouble I'm thinking will my fasteners corrode and will the treated lumber warp and shrink and mess everything up. I'm not too concerned about the health effects from having ACQ wood in the house.

    The basement is dry.

    Now that I've read up on treated lumber, I can't seem to thinking about anythiing else. I'm envisioning my shower walls falling apart and the drywall screws rusting and streaking down the walls.
  2. SacCity

    SacCity In the Trades

    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Don't worry about it at this point its too late to do anything about it.
    Lots and lots of houses are built with a treated sole plate, and green sinkers to attach the framing. It will take an awful lot of corrosion before things start to fall apart.
    Michael
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2011
  3. rogerlarry

    rogerlarry New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Chicago
    Thank you, its what I needed to hear. I'll sleep better now.
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,019
    Location:
    New England
    Unless you used AKAT (kiln dried after treatment) wood, YES, you will have problems. The really wet stuff tends to warp and really make a mess of things as it dries out. The fasteners, may survive okay, but the warping may destroy the tile. Drywall screws are quite brittle and have no corrosion resistance. CBU screws would have had a much better chance of surviving.

    A steam shower is an extreme test case for a shower - the steam pressure requires that you waterproof it really well. There are various approved methods to do this. It doesn't sound like you are using one of them. The bible on this is the TCNA (Tile Council North America) handbook, that is the basis of most code agencies on building anything with tile.

    Check out www.johnbridge.com for help on tiling your steam shower.
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  5. kreemoweet

    kreemoweet New Member

    Messages:
    371
    Location:
    Seattle. WA
    In the soggy Northwest, it takes a couple of years for drywall screws used to fasten wood members, fully exposed to the weather, to
    corrode to the point of failure. Framing nails I am sure will last longer. Even if you used the wet PT lumber, it will dry out in a few
    months and presumably stay that way, at which point corrosion should be nil. If you havn't tiled yet, you should wait until the lumber
    dries out, as there may well be warpage issues.
  6. rogerlarry

    rogerlarry New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Chicago
    Thanks for the help

    I'm going to leave it as-is and hope that I don't have issues while I'm alive.
Similar Threads: Treated lumber
Forum Title Date
Toilet Forum discussions Rant - Licensed plumber doesn't mean squat Jul 13, 2014
Toilet Forum discussions Plumber installed double sanitary tee in back to back install of eco drakes Apr 12, 2014
Toilet Forum discussions Plumber used Non Standard Water Supply Location & Toto Toilets Jan 6, 2014
Toilet Forum discussions Bad plumber or what?? Jun 27, 2013
Toilet Forum discussions Toilets with bidet features, Ed the Plumber, Ed Del Grande Apr 2, 2013

Share This Page