Shower valve shut-offs necessary?

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by dakotakid, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. dakotakid

    dakotakid New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Rochester Hills MI
    I'm remodeling two bathrooms consecutively, and have the common wet wall between them open. The master bath has a shower only, with no access to the back side of the valve and drop-ear when tiled. Likewise, the bathtub/shower in the second bathroom has no easy access to the back of the valve.

    Is there any point to installing inline shut-off valves in addition to the screwdriver shutoffs on these valves? I plan to leave access to behind the lav in both of the bathrooms, and could install small ball valves that could be shut-off in an emergency to allow the rest of the system to stay active. Or is this gilding the lily?

    I'm using Danze valves with integrated screwdriver shut-offs, but from what I've read, most screwdriver shut-offs typically calcify and freeze shut down the road, when you most need them.

    What do y'all think?

    TIA
  2. PlumbPowerHouse

    PlumbPowerHouse Plumber

    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I would go with the ball valves if your going to allow access. It will be easier and you won't have to deal with the stress of having to worry about the screw shutoffs. As a plumber, we usually don't put shut offs on a shower unless requested. I would do it with ball valves, that's your best bet.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,051
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    valves

    YOU are being paranoid. At least 99% of tub and shower valves are installed without ANY secondary shut offs, not even integral stops, and they manage to survive quite well, thank you.
  4. dakotakid

    dakotakid New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Rochester Hills MI
    Thanks guys! I am a bit paranoid, but one of these valves needed to be replaced about 12 years ago (house is almost 50 years old) and it was murder going through the mud wall and tile to get to it. The access will help that some, so maybe the extra valves are extraneous. Chances are any major work would need the main shut off anyway. Is that a fair assumption?
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,051
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    assumption

    Your assumption is correct, and even a minor repair is usually easier to do by turning off the main valve.
    1. Most valves can be repaired without removing the trim plate, so the plumber would either NOT know the integral stops were there, or would not want to bother accessing them (my feelings towards them) even if they did work.
    2. The plumber might not know about your added valves so he would shut off all the water anyway.

    The only time the integral stops would have any real benefit is if you had a major catastrophe and had to shut the shower valve off for an extended period while you locate parts for it. Which could happen with a Danze valve.
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