sewage ejector pump or upflush toilet?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Darlene, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. Darlene

    Darlene New Member

    Messages:
    3
    I have a tri-level home & want to add toilet, sink, & shower in the basement.
    I currenty have a sump pit which the washer/AC dump into-have not had any problems. I am trying to decide which way to go when it comes to adding the toilet. Most plumbers in my area recommend the sewage ejector pump. I have concerns. What might cause this to fail (other than electricity)? If it fails will my basement flood with sewage? If the pump fails, do you have a smelly, dirty pit you have to open to get it out? What if my septic system or drain field fails, will sewage back up into house? Can the sink/shower discharge into the pit or does it have to go into the sump pit?

    My question regarding the upflush toilet system (like Saniflo or Qwik Jon) where does the sink/shower water discharge? Are they loud? Can they flush with one flush.

    Just generally what is the buzz on these systems?

    Thanks for any help. Sorry so many questions just trying to make the best decision.

    D. Green
    eurekapeds@sbcglobal.net
  2. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    You probably want a package system that will take care of showers, toilet, and everything in the basement. You may want to put your washer into it also.

    There is a check valve to prevent backflow, and if you flush a diaper down the drain it will probably plug up. You shouldn't need a grinder pump which is much more expensive.

    Your basement won't flood if it fails if you stop putting water into it. You could easily hook up a loud alarm to go off if it fails.

    Yes, there is a nasty pit to open up if you have to replace the pump, but it is a "lift out" job, not a crawl in the pit job.

    I like to find out what is available so I can negotiate with the plumber from a base of knowledge. You can get some idea by looking at www.grainger.com and doing some product searches (or if you can get a Grainger catalog). When you get to their site, you can do a keyword search on simplex sewage system package and you will get bunch of them to look at. Click on the catalog number by the picture to get the specs.

    There are also some that don't show up in the search above. Do another search on dayton sewage system .

    I would probably pick something like the Stock No 5YU15 or the 3XA92 or the 3XA93. Others may be similar and I haven't looked at all of them.

    One of the critical things is that you get enough flow (GPM) and head (ft) to overcome the rise to the point where it dumps into your gravity system. Assuming you are pumping up one floor level, I would get something that has at least 50 GPM at 15 ft of head. Flow is especially important if you put the washer into it.
  3. tear up the floor

    I am not sure what Bob is talking about or wether
    he means the above ground package or a floor pit


    I like tearing up the floor and installing a pit
    pit because it increases the value of your home
    over those packages that make it feel like you are living
    in a FEMA TRAILER or on a house boat somewhere....


    tearing up the floor is more expensive, but it definetley
    makes it seem like a better job than the package systems
    that you have to "step up " onto

    and you can add a floor drain to that level of the house
    if you so choose ..


    the best pump is the ZOELLER with a separate mercury switch
    attached to the side of the pump on the pipe for easy service
    down the road

    the Zoeller will pump it up on the roof and down your gutters
    if wanted to .....
  4. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    I suggested a system in the floor. I would not put a system above the floor. I don't think the below ground system that hides it all away is all that much more expensive.

    Zoeller is a fine pump. My problem is that a $500 pump and tank unit becomes a $5000 installation if you can't negotiate from knowledge of what is available in the marketplace. It is never a negotiation unless you are prepared to walk away and select an alternative.

    If you are adding a toilet, sink, and shower in the basement, then it involves below-floor plumbing and the sewage ejector system should be another unit, just part of the package and included in the cost, not much more expensive than one of those Japanese toilets.
  5. toolaholic

    toolaholic General Contractor Carpenter

    Messages:
    874
    Location:
    Marin Co. Ca.
    Mark ,thank's, LOL

    I can just picture out the roof,into the gutters. Be careful, some DIY may
    install to these specs. I can see the inspector scratching his head :D
  6. prashster

    prashster New Member

    Messages:
    941
    Darlene-
    I was thinking of doing the same thing. I'm a homeowner, not a plumber, so take my advice with a grain of salt...

    Don't go with an above ground pump unit. They typically make them with 1.5" discharges and lower power motors, which make them less durable and more prone to clogs than their in-ground counterparts. I've read this in a million web posts, and my local plumbing supply co corroborates this.

    Of course, roughing-in the below ground piping required for the inground pits will add about a couple thousand to the cost of your project, unless you're handy with a jackhammer.

    I cannot comment on comparable quality of the different Simplex systems, but I believe it's better to purchase the parts separately; there isn't that much to the whole system anyway (check valve, pump, basin, lid, discharge pipe). In the end, you'll save a little money (~$50-$100) and you'll get better components (especially on the check valve and pump).

    That's my 2Cents
  7. Darlene

    Darlene New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Thanks for the info guys. Looks like the pit pump is the way to go. So now I have some comparing to do. Thanks to Bob for the detailed info to compare pumps. I agree, I don't want the plumber to charge me whatever he wants, I need to be in the know. Thanks again everyone.
    Darlene
  8. sumppumppimp

    sumppumppimp New Member

    Messages:
    104
  9. Darlene

    Darlene New Member

    Messages:
    3
    How do you know what size to get? This is just a guest bathroom. 3br home 2 adults 2 kids
  10. get the big one

    just get the big one

    in case some one
    leaves "the big one " in the pit


    the price between the wimpy light duty one and the
    best is not more than 75 bucks

    and because I am
    the guy that would have to come back out
    and "dislodje some nasty bad boy" out of the pump
    I always put the better one in...

    the best pump is the ZOELLER with a separate mercury switch
    attached to the side of the pump on the pipe for easy service
    down the road


    always
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2006
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