Replacing Double Garage Doors With A Single?

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by Livin4Real, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    I'm looking to replace my old beat up double roll up doors with one big single garage door. Our garage has about a 2' gable overhang above the doors, I'd like to know how one goes about supporting the area above while replacing it? I plan on using a glulam and it'll be about a 16' span.

    Thanks,
    Brian
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2008
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,266
    Location:
    New England
    Build a temporary load-bearing wall prior to tearing out that center support. Brace it in place well so you don't knock it down during the installation of the gulam beam.
  3. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    That's what I thought. The house was built in the 60's and I haven't had a chance to check out how they attached the overhang to the current headers which is worrying me. That'll be my weekend goal, lol.
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,045
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    overhang

    Unless the joists run parallel to the garage doors, which would be unusual, the overhang is normally just an extension of the ceiling joists crossing over the doors' headers.
  5. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Any structural revision requires a building permit, and if you don't get one, you'll have to disclose that when you sell the house. The building inspector will require you to hire an engineer. He'll need to know if its supporting the floor, and if so, how long the joists are. Also the slope of the roof, wall height over the door, and type of siding. Expect to pay about $300 for the engineer.

    Consider using LVLs rather than a glulam. Laminated Veneer Lumber is stronger, and comes in 1-3/4" thick plies (2 are the thickness of a 2x4). Since you can put the first ply up, then the second, it's far easier to man-handle in place.
  6. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    The following is not a joke; it is a suggestion.

    1. Make sure your homeowners insurance covers collapse.
    2. Have the engineer inspect the details of the attachments and the erection process.
    3. Carefully measure the elevations before you remove the support and jack the beam into place to take the load.

    If you put the new beam into place without picking up the load, the beam will sag when the temporary support is removed and the load goes onto the beam.
  7. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    This is my problem. I'm sure they had a wonderful reason for running the ceiling joists this way :rolleyes:

    I've put this project on hold and decided to finish the basement....again (I'm in Martinsville, IN , recently wiped off the map due to floods :( )
  8. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

    Messages:
    2,734
    Location:
    Central Florida
    If the joists are parallel to the door (mine are, too), then the doorwall probably isn't much of a load-bearing wall. I'd still get professional help, but your problem is simplified somewhat. Can you post a picture of the front of the garage?
  9. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,045
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    really?

    Laminated Veneer Lumber is stronger, and comes in 1-3/4" thick plies (2 are the thickness of a 2x4).

    either they are 3/4" thick which would make two of them equal to 1 1/2" which is the thickness of a 2x4, or two of them are 3" which is not as wide as a 2x4 but twice as thick as one.
  10. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Here' a link to the catalog: http://www.bc.com/wood/ewp/simpleFraming/versaLam.html

    The Eastern products guide shows them in 1.5, 1.73, 3.5, and 7" widths. I've been specifying them for several years and the local yards only stock 1.75" widths (2 x 1.75 = 3.5"), since the manufacturer allows up to 4 plies to be bolted together.
  11. B2CHR

    B2CHR New Member

    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Central NC
    Maybe Southrenman should have said two of them are them same "width" as a 2x4. 1 3/4 X 2 + 3 1/2.
  12. Livin4Real

    Livin4Real New Member

    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    Indianapolis, IN
    They actually have a hybrid version of glulam and lvl now. I'll try and find a pic. It's a glulam beam with the top and bottom layer being lvl. Supposed to be wicked strong. I used a glulam when I took out the wall between our kitchen and living room but will be looking into the new ones when I do the garage. I'll get a pic posted of the garage. I just noticed today that they only used a 1" x for the garage roof ridge :confused:
  13. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

    Messages:
    2,734
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Very common. Most truss systems have no ridge at all.
  14. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Yes that would have been more correct- thanks.
  15. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I was wondering when they would start to do that. The top and bottom have routinely been a higher grade or even machine rated plies so it makes sense to use LVLs. The veneers in LVLs are free of all defects so can be visually rated to a much higher stress. But unless there is a substantial cost savings I'd go with LVLs since the individual loose plies can be put up one after the other so less weight is being lifted at any one time.

    A lot of times the ridge board is not a structural member but just a convenient place to nail the rafters, so the 1†doesn’t surprise me.
  16. Bill Arden

    Bill Arden Computer Programmer

    Messages:
    584
    Location:
    MN, USA
    on my garage the trusses run parallel with the 18 foot wide door, this means that the laminated beam over the door is only supporting a 4 foot strip of roof.

    The two foot overhang has beams that sit on top of the end piece and tie into the last rafter.

    I know I had to pay more to get it built like this, but I know it wont sag over time and the 2 foot overhangs are nice to have.

    FYI: my only regret is not spending extra to have a taller garage door.
  17. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

    Messages:
    2,734
    Location:
    Central Florida
    My design notes include a taller garage door, and a drive-through garage. This is thwarted in some locales where they require that garages don't face the street, unfortunately, but does allow easy access to the back yard, which in my case would include a boat ramp.
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