Need help replacing shower drain base

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by GlobalTerrain, Sep 14, 2007.

  1. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Greetings, this is my first ever post here.

    I am replacing my upstairs master shower (36"x36"). I've removed the walls, cleaned the mold (original issue- green board failed), and replaced the insulation. I removed the shower pan, had to drill and chisel is out. Now I have what's left of the old drain. I have a new PVC shower drain (Schulter Systems) ready to replace.

    How do I properly remove and prep the old drain base to make it ready for this new drain?

    Thanks in advance, I'll try to post a pic.

    GT

    Attached Files:

  2. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,347
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    first you need cut the pan rbber seal from your 2" pvc.Make sure you dont
    damage the pvc.Claen the pvc then try to install your new pan.
  3. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Thank you!!!

    cwhyu2,

    That simple bit of advice you just gave me worked. It must seem so obvious, but my inexperience... I could only find videos on this (very few) and they all showed hacksawing the PVC then refitting a new piece.

    I just pried in the rubber and it came out. I thought the rubber was glued in because it was so tight, but it gave way.

    I think the drain pipe is suitable to just reattach the new Schluter drain. It looks level, clean and just slightly below the substrate.

    Thanks again. A couple pics reward.

    GT

    Attached Files:

  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,128
    Location:
    New England
    I've been impressed with the Schluter shower system using Kerdi. You'll like it. Probably the best place to get help on this, though, is at www.johnbridge.com. If you don't have it, consider downloading John's e-book on doing a shower with it. It's cheap insurance and well worth it...price is cheap and the tips are priceless. There are guys (and gals) that do this daily over there and can help.

    I just got back from the factory school on this...while there are many ways to build a shower, theirs, done properly has numerous advantages; one proprietary one is their unique drain assembly - very easy to use and the lateral adjustment and square grill make it much easier to plan, layout and install than any others I've seen. I last used a 2" mosaic...was able to lay it out and just remove 4 tiles from the sheet for the drain...didn't have to cut one single floor tile for the entire shower - try that with any other system.
  5. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Schluter Systems

    Thanks for the info and encouragement. I'm taking my shower renovation slow (biggest project of my life - not really a DYI'er).

    I read up and decided to go with Schluter from the JohnBridge site, awesome. Had to come here to get an answer to my drain removal question. On the other site I get frowned upon when I post a new thread on my same project, but I was getting very little feedback there. Are you also a moderator there (assumption because you attended the special Schluter course/demo).

    After watching the Schluter videos and reading the manual, I can't imagine much more I could get out of John's Kerdi book (but at only $10, I guess I have to get it).

    I've decided to go with 2x2" tiles like you are recommending. I'm also using the Schluter floor, I'll have to trim it down to fit my space.

    Looking forward to working in the Kerdi, but I hear it's a little tougher to apply to Durock.

    Thanks again.
    GT
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,128
    Location:
    New England
    If you haven't already put it up, just put regular drywall on the walls...you could use 5/8" stuff if you wish for a little more stiffness, but believe me, the 1/2" drywall is plenty stiff after the Kerdi and tile is on it. The cbu works, but it costs more, you'll have more seams, is heavier to move home, and harder to cut. CBU will work fine, though. Make sure to either spritz it or wipe with a sponge or it will absorb too much water and give you grief when installing the Kerdi. If you choose drywall, clean it off with a damp sponge to remove any dust before applying thinset. Don't let the thinset skin over before you attach the Kerdi - same is true when installing tile.

    When mixing the thinset, make sure to use a premium dryset thinset. Also, mix the thinset with the larger amount of water they specify on the bag and mix it for the time they specify. One thing we learned was that the thinset literally appears a totally different product if it is just mixed verses mixing it the time the manufacturer specifies.

    Protocol says, one project, one thread. It is really hard to keep the subtle history straight if you have multiple threads on one project. If you don't get an answer, respond to your own post and it pops back towards the top.

    Don't try to use pieces wrapping around corners until you get the feel for it. If you don't have one, get a drywall taping knife - knock the sharp corners off with a file, grinding stone, or scraping it on a concrete floor; this helps to prevent catching them in the Kerdi. Doesn't need much, just don't want it sharp.

    Make sure you get good coverage, fully embed the stuff, and pull back a section to check for 100% coverage. You can live with less, but there is no reason to not get it. You can't live with less than 100% on a seam. There is no required order of installation, you can overlap the seams any order or direction you want as long as they have at least 2". Strange, but the stuff is hydroscopic...it repels water, and with a tight seal on the thinset at a seam, water will never penetrate more than 1/4" (and then only with standing water over a long time) - so you have an 8x safety factor.
  7. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,347
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    Glad to be of help.
  8. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Kerdi tips

    jad,

    Thanks for all the feedback, I'll try to post my progress tomorrow (I guess I could be posting to my original thread on the johnbridge site?).

    I bleached everyplace I saw any dark wood, there was some mold there originally (this is what started my project). I also read putting some Borax behind the walls will help kill any mold that might possibly try to grow in the future (suggestions?).

    I've already bought the Durock, it's waiting in my hall, I think I can do it with 3 - 3x5' pieces.

    Hoping to dryfit the drain (again), but this time with the Schluter floor, I may have to cut the PVC back a bit. Next is to install the Durock (putting it on the floor and screwing it in every 8 inches (also using liquid nails). Then install the floor and drain. Lastly the Kerdi. From your advice, I'll do the large walls with it first, then tape the seams and curb.

    Thanks again.
    GT
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,128
    Location:
    New England
    Is the cbu on the floor for tile, I assume? You don't want any below the pan. The floor must be plywood to do the pan.

    You also DO NOT want liquid nails anywhere near the cbu...it requires a bed of thinset, then the screws or nails. The thinset doesn't really need to anchor the cbu to the floor (you really don't want it to, either) - the thinset is to fill any voids so the cbu is 100% supported. Make sure that you use the alkalai resistant mesh tape on the seams prior to installing the tile. You can install it as you tile. the tape is to make the cbu sheets a monolithic panel.

    You need to read the manufacturer's instructions...just to ensure something isn't missed.
  10. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Drain too height, how best to cut it?

    jad,

    Glad I came back here again, thought my 'plumbing' issue was resolved, but it isn't completely. My drain pipe sticking up is about 2" too high, how best to cut it back? I thought the Schluter drain had some height adjustment?

    I'm using CBU for the walls only, the floor will remain plywood.

    I decided not to go with building my own mud pan, I'm using the Schluter poly one (I'll just have to cut it down to size). Hopeing to level any minor non-level sides with a little extra thinset below the Schluter floor.

    I thought I read that it was a good idea to also use liquid nails when attaching the CBU (Durock) to the walls? There was liquid adhesive behind the Greenboard that I replaced.

    I have "Wall Span" Drywall Joint Tape for the corner transitions between pieces of CBU. But here I thought I read that with Kerdi, I don't need it?

    I'm going to try to copy and paste this back to my original posting on the JohnBridge site, my username is the same.

    Thanks again.
    GT

    Attached Files:

  11. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,347
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    Inside pvc pipe cutter where you cant tell you where to find one will reasearch..
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2007
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,128
    Location:
    New England
    Okay, you had me worried about the liquid nails under cbu on the floor...probably won't help but shouldn't hurt on the walls, though.

    The Kerdi will act as the tape on the seams, so no separate action needed for those on either cbu or drywall. If the tapered edges of drywall end up behind the Kerdi, some people prefill that tapered area with thinset, screeed it level then let it dry before you add the kerdi. It's easier later when you tile for it to be level, and you don't want to leave that section super thick in the taper with thinset in one step. the same is true with cbu, if it has tapered edges.
  13. GlobalTerrain

    GlobalTerrain New Member

    Messages:
    16
    sounds good, thanks!

    With any luck, if I don't sleep in tomorrow will be the day (durock, floor, drain and Kerdi!). If I sleep in then watch NFL, maybe I'll get to it on Monday (lots of time off....LOL).

    Once I start with the thinset, it looks like I have to install all the Kerdi at once. but then I could wait a day for the tile?

    GT
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,128
    Location:
    New England
    You can stop anywhere you wish while installing the Kerdi as long as you don't leave any accumulations of thinset that would leave lumps or bumps which makes it hard to tile evenly over. You can start tiling once the Kerdi is up. the only caution you need to be aware of is that if you try to lift a tile, you may break the bond of the kerdi to the wall. Also, make sure you wipe the cbu down with a wet sponge first...otherwise, it will suck the moisture out of the thinset and possibly compromise the bond. This also removes most of the dust that can be a problems as well. Don't try to put up a sheet that wraps around the shower the first time...once you get the technique down, you can do bigger sheets. Better to do one wall at a time. Doesn't matter if it is horizontal or vertical, depending on the wall.
Similar Threads: Need help
Forum Title Date
Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog need some help cleaning a grimy shower Sep 23, 2014
Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog Need help identifying shower valve (leaks) Sep 14, 2014
Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog New shower, need help with setup plan? Sep 12, 2014
Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog Help to identify rough in valve/ need trim Sep 8, 2014
Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog i need help identifying shower valve and/or locating a replacement cartridge Aug 7, 2014

Share This Page