installing vanity in out-of-square corner

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by LiamM, Oct 27, 2007.

  1. LiamM

    LiamM New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Hi

    I'm having a plumber install a new bathroom sink, toilet, fixtures, etc, but before he comes, I tried to test-fit the new vanity sink and countertop that I had bought from HD. The vanity is going in a corner, and it's a really tight fit.

    Anyhow, the sink fit (barely), but the corner is a bit out-of-square. It's a little more than 90 degrees, so when I fit the sink, it's either flush with the back wall, but with a gap on the side that increases from back to front (it opens to maybe 3/4"), or vice versa.

    The walls are already primed, and (since I did the drywalling), I'm guessing that I left too much mud in the corner when taping.

    Could anyone suggest any ways I could try to conceal it? It seems like an awful big gap to try and caulk.

    Thanks
  2. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,052
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    I am facing the same thing in remodeling our powder room. Some vanity tops are supplied an inch wider than the finished dimension, so that you can scribe a line and use a jigsaw or belt sander to trim off the excess along the wall, thus giving a good fit.
  3. LiamM

    LiamM New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Hi Steve -

    Thanks for the quick reply.

    The vanity/countertop I have has a marble countertop...is it possible to scribe it, or will it just ruin the whole thing?
  4. little buddy

    little buddy New Member

    Messages:
    37
    Steve's idea will work. When having a large gap, such as this I have also cut a little of the sheetrock from the top of the backsplash downward. Using both methods will prevent it looking like your back splash has been drastically altered.
  5. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    I cut my door trim when I put mine in. Was much easier than cutting the stone.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,835
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    top

    I doubt that any HD sink has a "marble" countertop. More likely cultured marble, (plastic), that cuts or sands as if it were wood. And if I were the plumber doing the work, you might as well install the cabinet and fasten the countertop, because I am not going to do it.
  7. LiamM

    LiamM New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Hi folks, thanks for the replies. And hj, yes, it is a cultured marble top.

    I have another question...the underside of the countertop - at the bottom of the bowl where the drain pipe will be attached - has crumbled away a bit. I'd like to build it back up a bit so the gasket, piping, etc has a good solid surface to go against. Is there a certain epoxy or filler I would use on this type of material? I tried contacting the manufacturer, but they make it almost impossible if you don't have the SKU handy.

    Thanks again
  8. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    It will probably look best if you make it uniformly snug against the back wall and install a separate piece of material as a "side splash" where it goes against the wall.
  9. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    You might want to consider recessing part of the countertop into the drywall, or use a piece of quarter round (or side splash as Bob just mentioned) to fill in the gap.

    RE the underside of the sink: The plumber should use a lot of plumber's putty there, so that should fill in any deformities.
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2007
  10. LiamM

    LiamM New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Hi folks, thanks for all the feedback

    As suggested, I'll make the sink flush with the back wall, and plan on using some moulding to try and cover the side gap.

    In regards to the underside of the sink, I didn't know plumber's putty would work....thanks for the info
  11. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    If the sink is really that damaged, why don't you take it back?
  12. LiamM

    LiamM New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Hi Eric -

    I may be giving the wrong impression of the problem...the crumbling at the bottom isn't extensive, and I don't think it will require much extra plumber's putty. I was just curious as to whether there was a relatively simple fix to the problem.
Similar Threads: installing vanity
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Need help installing vanity over shutoff valves Sep 26, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Installing new vanity Dec 23, 2010
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Problem after installing vanity sink Dec 31, 2006
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Installing Utility Sink in older house Oct 16, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice installing water hammer arrestors May 26, 2014

Share This Page